View Full Version : Why do NESes fail?


Birdjaguar
Sep 09, 2006, 01:17 PM
It seems that lots of NESes get off to a great start then crash and burn. Without getting personal, why is that? I've listed some questions that come to mind. Pick and choose or come up with your own.

Is it because mods lose interest?
Is modding is too time consuming or difficult to do well?
Or do players lose interest and move on the the next "new" game?
Is real life too distracting or is it just that "new" games are "always" better?
Do more games fail becasue the mod quits or because players lose interest?
Would most NESers rather play a good game or mod a good game?

North King
Sep 09, 2006, 01:22 PM
I calculated stNNES X as lowering my math grade by 5%. Alone.

Modding is a huge responsibility, and when something bad happens--be it something in the family, or a player you really liked quitting, that's usually enough by itself to close an NES.

Kentharu
Sep 09, 2006, 01:27 PM
i think it is a combination of players lossing interest and mods lossing interest because players loss interest

or sometimes its because players look like they have lost interest

North King
Sep 09, 2006, 01:33 PM
or sometimes its because players look like they have lost interest

Agreed. A comment like "Oh, well this was expected. :rolleyes:" is perhaps one of the most stupid and maddening things you can say to someone who is in the middle of investing hours and hours of their time to get you an update, enough that often enough, it kills the NES in and of itself.

Players who whine about how an update isn't coming along as quickly as they'd like ought to be shot. The minimum I've heard an update taking these days is 2 hours. Assuming you pay them minimum wage, even, you'd be talking $15 dollars worth of time that the mod is doing for you, unpaid. Some updates can take as much as 6 hours of straight work, or even days. So what's an update worth? Anywhere from $10 to > $100 of work for the mod. Unless we start paying moderators, then shut up, because it's a massive chunk of time that they're devoting to your enjoyment.

das
Sep 09, 2006, 01:44 PM
Most often it is because of mods losing interest; all other things you mentioned merely cause them to lose interest, and only in this way are trully a factor in the failure of NESes (granted, there are exceptions).

Warman17
Sep 09, 2006, 01:44 PM
Or do players lose interest and move on the the next "new" game?
Is real life too distracting or is it just that "new" games are "always" better?
Do more games fail becasue the mod quits or because players lose interest?

Most of my NESes fail because of lack of player involvement. I've only ended 2 neses because I lost interest.

Birdjaguar
Sep 09, 2006, 01:45 PM
So...
Player impatience affects mod committment
Time committment required for good modding is unappreciated by players.

Reno
Sep 09, 2006, 01:46 PM
Mostly players losing intrest, I suppose.

Players who whine about how an update isn't coming along as quickly as they'd like ought to be shot. The minimum I've heard an update taking these days is 2 hours. Assuming you pay them minimum wage, even, you'd be talking $15 dollars worth of time that the mod is doing for you, unpaid. Some updates can take as much as 6 hours of straight work, or even days. So what's an update worth? Anywhere from $10 to > $100 of work for the mod. Unless we start paying moderators, then shut up, because it's a massive chunk of time that they're devoting to your enjoyment.

I agree with this 100 %.

Birdjaguar
Sep 09, 2006, 01:51 PM
My experience since February has been that mods have shut down the games even though the players seem active and excited about the NES. Mostly time is the stated reason.

North King
Sep 09, 2006, 01:53 PM
My experience since February has been that mods have shut down the games even though the players seem active and excited about the NES. Mostly time is the stated reason.

One of the ones you're speaking of was my stNNES X, right? As I have mentioned above, that one did indeed end due to time constraints, not lack of mod interest. I actually wanted to restart that NES, but after a mod closed it for spam, I decided against PMing him to revive it.

das
Sep 09, 2006, 01:56 PM
Lack of player interest tends to negatively affect moderator interest.

Oruc
Sep 09, 2006, 02:10 PM
Waiting a long time for an update kills my interest, we have to wait a week for each update now.
Sometimes you just dont get a feel for Nes, or sometimes a mod just kills a game you were excited about, because he didnt get feel for it either.


Players who whine about how an update isn't coming along as quickly as they'd like ought to be shot. The minimum I've heard an update taking these days is 2 hours. Assuming you pay them minimum wage, even, you'd be talking $15 dollars worth of time that the mod is doing for you, unpaid. Some updates can take as much as 6 hours of straight work, or even days. So what's an update worth? Anywhere from $10 to > $100 of work for the mod. Unless we start paying moderators, then shut up, because it's a massive chunk of time that they're devoting to your enjoyment.

Why dont you stop opening nes's and do us all a favour.

North King
Sep 09, 2006, 02:13 PM
Edit: Nvm.

Luckymoose
Sep 09, 2006, 02:50 PM
Waiting a long time for an update kills my interest, we have to wait a week for each update now.

I know exactly what you mean. But if the NES is really good the time goes fast. Usually. But if its really good like JD's current nes. Time goes by slowly. :(

I hate when a mod kills a NES,just because he has no time. Keep it open,update little by little. If you do 1/7th of a Update a day. In a week you have a Update. You don't have to wait forever to write them.

Accually,if you can't get past 1-2 updates. Dont even try.

North King
Sep 09, 2006, 03:11 PM
I hate when a mod kills a NES,just because he has no time. Keep it open,update little by little. If you do 1/7th of a Update a day. In a week you have a Update. You don't have to wait forever to write them.

When it's a choice between keeping one NES open in a forum that already has 5 at the bare minimum, and suffering a massive hit in other areas of the life that actually affect you much later in life, well, the choice is all too easy.

Abaddon
Sep 09, 2006, 03:16 PM
clues in the name...

LittleBoots
Sep 09, 2006, 03:25 PM
Perhaps comments about what mods "should" do should be made only by mods. Otherwise, one has no idea what exactly goes in to modding and/or how much work it is/takes and therefore one's opinion is, at best, irrelevant. If you have an idea about how a mod should behave, open an NES and behave that way yourself.

Given the numbers of players in current NESes and the length and breadth of orders, I think one update a week is really a job well done. Maybe that would be different if players gave orders differently, or if rules or stats were done differently, but the former is not up to the mod and the latter seems to be an evolution most people appreciate, otherwise one would assume it wouldn't be here.

Oruc
Sep 09, 2006, 03:27 PM
clues in the name...

No-one expects them to last forever, but when one NES last 2 updates and another 50 its obvious which is the failure.

Perhaps comments about what mods "should" do should be made only by mods. Otherwise, one has no idea what exactly goes in to modding and/or how much work it is/takes and therefore one's opinion is, at best, irrelevant. If you have an idea about how a mod should behave, open an NES and behave that way yourself.

Given the numbers of players in current NESes and the length and breadth of orders, I think one update a week is really a job well done.

I can comment on almost whatever I like, im not a god-damed window cleaner doesnt mean I cant tell him how it should be done nor am I a politician, or a head of state and yet everyone thinks they know how that should be done.
If they dont like modding then dont, if you think its a hassle or a waste of time then dont bother.

jalapeno_dude
Sep 09, 2006, 03:28 PM
I know exactly what you mean. But if the NES is really good the time goes fast. Usually. But if its really good like JD's current nes. Time goes by slowly. :(

I hate when a mod kills a NES,just because he has no time. Keep it open,update little by little. If you do 1/7th of a Update a day. In a week you have a Update. You don't have to wait forever to write them.

Accually,if you can't get past 1-2 updates. Dont even try.
I'm working on it, okay? :p

Birdjaguar
Sep 09, 2006, 06:12 PM
One of the ones you're speaking of was my stNNES X, right? As I have mentioned above, that one did indeed end due to time constraints, not lack of mod interest. I actually wanted to restart that NES, but after a mod closed it for spam, I decided against PMing him to revive it.I'm trying to keep this general and not a place to point fingers. :) Part of my reason for it is to figure out how to make the first NES I start succeed. The second part is to better understand the dynamics between mods and players and how they affect a game.

Birdjaguar
Sep 09, 2006, 06:15 PM
Is part of the problem that players know that most games fail and so they sign up for more than they can play and hope that some of them stick around? Hedging their bets so to speak.

Luckymoose
Sep 09, 2006, 08:30 PM
Is part of the problem that players know that most games fail and so they sign up for more than they can play and hope that some of them stick around? Hedging their bets so to speak.

Yes.Exactly.

I hate joining a nes that doesn't look liek it'll stay open. I though JD's was going ot last 2 updates max but its one of the best I have ever played.

*will not correct spelling errors, I r bad grammar*

Symphony D.
Sep 09, 2006, 08:45 PM
I know I actively avoid games that look like they're going to crash. My moderating experience is very limited, but from a player's perspective, I know a fairly large problem is just not connecting with your country, even if it seemed interesting at first. I've dropped out of a fair number of of NESes because of that. Being selective in what you take is prudent for all players, in my opinion... then again, this might also hurt niche NESes, so it's something of a double-edged sword.

That said, updates do take a lot of effort, and people bugging you (in other threads even!) and things such as NAO, which have effectively made LINESII the Mod's favorite bombing range, are utterly deplorable, IMO.

Birdjaguar
Sep 09, 2006, 08:54 PM
... but from a player's perspective, I know a fairly large problem is just not connecting with your country, even if it seemed interesting at first. I've dropped out of a fair number of of NESes because of that. Being selective in what you take is prudent for all players, in my opinion... then again, this might also hurt niche NESes, so it's something of a double-edged sword.So in a historical NES people choose nations that force them into a style or culture that they aren't excited about? Any ideas on how to fix that?

Symphony D.
Sep 09, 2006, 09:05 PM
It doesn't even necessarily apply to historical NESes, I think. It's less common, though just as possible for it to happen in alt-historical or even fictional settings. The only way to prevent it, I'd say, is to look at the situation and see if there's really a way in which it hooks you. If there isn't, but it looks like it might just be to joyride around in, it probably isn't for you. I mean, it very well could be, but you might just be setting yourself up for disillusionment later. It probably depends on work load too - I like to put effort into the nations I pick, so it has to grip me for me to be motivated. If someone tends to be fairly light on effort (usually they're in more NESes too, so it's not really a bad thing) then it's probably not a big factor.

For example, if Victorian British culture and attitudes isn't really your thing, you probably shouldn't play Victorian Britain. Most players have some flexibility in their play styles and capacity to roleplay, but should generally try and stick to things that fit inside those so that they don't get bored. Unless they want to try and expand their horizons. "Pick things that fit what you like to do," I guess. Same story with all games that require a degree of roleplaying.

jalapeno_dude
Sep 09, 2006, 09:07 PM
It doesn't even necessarily apply to historical NESes, I think. It's less common, though just as possible for it to happen in alt-historical or even fictional settings. The only way to prevent it, I'd say, is to look at the situation and see if there's really a way in which it hooks you. If there isn't, but it looks like it might just be to joyride around in, it probably isn't for you. I mean, it very well could be, but you might just be setting yourself up for disillusionment later. It probably depends on work load too - I like to put effort into the nations I pick, so it has to grip me for me to be motivated. If someone tends to be fairly light on effort (usually they're in more NESes too, so it's not really a bad thing) then it's probably not a big factor.

For example, if Victorian British culture and attitudes isn't really your thing, you probably shouldn't play Victorian Britain. Most players have some flexibility in their play styles and capacity to roleplay, but should generally try and stick to things that fit inside those so that they don't get bored. Unless they want to try and expand their horizons. "Pick things that fit what you like to do," I guess. Same story with all games that require a degree of roleplaying.
I agree. That's why I tend to do fresh starts--I can create my nation, and thus take it in a direction that is interesting to me. I'll then set goals, which are usually not to conquer the world--for example, with the Eldranians I wanted to go down in a blaze of glory and force the formation of an alliance to fight me.

Swissempire
Sep 09, 2006, 09:57 PM
Players lose faith to easily*stares at own flock*

Israelite9191
Sep 10, 2006, 01:11 AM
Lack of Mod time. Both of my NESes closed because of time constraints. Likewise NK's fabulous NESes often close because of time. However, time alone is not enough. If it weren't for the horendous buggering of players, particularly of the type of one who has already posted in this thread but whose name I will not mention, most Mods who close their NESes becuase of time constraints would ride out the period of constrained time and come back at a normal pace later. Unfortunately, players are extraordinarily impatient. After Moding for the first time, I made it a point to NEVER bug a Mod, I would hope all NESers would hold themselves to the same rule.

Sheep
Sep 10, 2006, 05:50 AM
I close my neses because I dont get enough people intrested, I lose intrest or yeah something happens..

Oh and on the whole question of paying mods to update. The average update for one of my neses takes about 4.5 hours including stats worth of work. More if it is extremly busy update with lots of conflicts and what not to resolve. Limiting players to one pm and strategic instead of tactical orders did however help remedy this a little bit. Reason why I say paying mods to update. My company now pays me about 4400 USD an hour now so I dont see how people would be ABLE to afford to pay me. Having said this I am not particularly worried.

And no I am not paying for neses. One of the most attractive features is that it is free.

das
Sep 10, 2006, 07:19 AM
In other words, my theory stands: NESes die when mods, for whatever reasons, are unable to continue them, because mods are vital to NESing as hearts to human body (although there were a few individual cases of succesful moderator transplants ;) ).

North King
Sep 10, 2006, 08:51 AM
After Moding for the first time, I made it a point to NEVER bug a Mod, I would hope all NESers would hold themselves to the same rule.

Well, if, in private conversation, you ask me,

"Hey, NK. Sorry to bother you, but how's the update coming?"

Then I'll happily answer. But if, publically posted, you say:

"UPDATE! UPDATE! UPDATE! UPDATE! UPDATE NAO!"

Then I'll be angry and probably update slower just to spite you. :p

Birdjaguar
Sep 10, 2006, 09:18 AM
I close my neses because I dont get enough people intrested,I can understand that worry. But if you get enough to begin, and it gets going, it appears that people will join in later.

Is there a critical mass number of players you need for a game to be interesting and have staying power?

Oruc
Sep 10, 2006, 09:46 AM
People who bug mods are idiots, even if they do a mistake with your orders, like leaving something out, you should be polite and ask nicely if they could include your orders in the update.
rather than typing in caps (because they are supposedly shouting) and ranting and raving, its unnecessary and only creats a bad atmosphere.
Also if your annoyed at the update being late or believe their was no way an event could have happened like it did in the update, then you should not complain to the mod they have plently of other things they would rather do then listen to your whining, there are always plently of people on Aim and Msn who will pretend to listen.

Disenfrancised
Sep 10, 2006, 03:28 PM
I can understand that worry. But if you get enough to begin, and it gets going, it appears that people will join in later.

Is there a critical mass number of players you need for a game to be interesting and have staying power?

depends on the size of the system - if they are all interacting it can be quite low, Stars! was working fine with only 7-8. World map NESes do tend to need more it appears, and its better if they are interacting I think.

Israelite9191
Sep 10, 2006, 05:00 PM
Altogether, it normally takes me 10-12 hours spread over 2-3 days to do an update. Yes, I am obsesive.

Birdjaguar
Sep 10, 2006, 05:11 PM
Altogether, it normally takes me 10-12 hours spread over 2-3 days to do an update. Yes, I am obsesive.
I can see that if you had 12 or more players plus NPCs, and if there was a lot of war, it would take a while to work through and write up.

Disenfrancised
Sep 10, 2006, 05:21 PM
Altogether, it normally takes me 10-12 hours spread over 2-3 days to do an update. Yes, I am obsesive.

me too (well maybe not 12 hours)

Israelite9191
Sep 10, 2006, 05:29 PM
Actually, for me it takes less time if I have more players and more in-depth orders. I try to make happenings in NPC parts of the world just as interesting as those elsewhere, which is incredibly hard when I have to do all the research and work. Oh, and I do a lot of reasearch, and I mean A LOT. You may not notice it, but there is research that goes into every statement I make in an update. Everything needs to be realistic, names need to make sense, etc. That's why when people join with inacurate stuff in their stats, I try to get them to change it (such as when one person joined as Eire and made their capital Dublin, which wasn't a major city until the Vikings and was called/is called in Gaelic Dun Aillen).

~Darkening~
Sep 10, 2006, 06:10 PM
I have never, not even once, bothered a mod for an update. I know that i don't want it done to me, so I don't do it to others. I'm firmly anti-NAO.

jalapeno_dude
Sep 10, 2006, 07:15 PM
The general rule for me is 20 minutes per player. It's usually closer to 30.

Gelion
Sep 11, 2006, 02:57 PM
One thing people failed to metion in this thread is that NES happens between the updates. NES is more than a wargame its about LIVING the nation you are playing. How many could seriously say that they get involved?
If a mod sees no stories, no diplomacy, no people getting involved in their nations in the 3 or 5 pages of text over a week how can he find motivation for a good update?
Picture this metaphor:
Tall giant like mod and many normal sized players are moving through the marsh. They are tied by a rope: mod and players. Sometimes mod has to pull players out of the marsh. Sometimes players help the mod out. However unless both "halves" move smoothly the "saving" cannot continue for long.

Second reason: Dreaded Orders.
Consider this from the mods perspective:
You get 10-15 orders for a game. Three are illegible, six are 3-4 lines of text of "grow economy" type. Two are "roxxlololo" "I pwn all". Which normally leaves about 4-5 orders one can really enjoy reading and working with. Now where should the motivation come from? Obviously a mod does stories for those 4-5 nations only to get complaints from 10 other players as to why nothing interesting happened in their countries.

Reason Three: "I got an idea!"
When a mod opens a game he usually has some idea in mind. "Hey I want to be God in ancient world", "hey I read a book about Mongol conquests, lets have a game with tribes mixing". "hey lets do a ww2 game cuz I read about this cool battle of 1944". What does a mod get? Lets take the ww2 example:
Mod thinks - lets do a ww2 tactical scenario - players would manage war production and command battles:
What's happening?
- 2-3 people start projects that take 15 years. THIS IS a 3 months/turn game people!!! What are you thinking?
- One person dreams of unifying south america as Spain. It would take decades to bind Latins together!!!
- someone whines about why cant Germany start Manhattan project. This is a tactics game.... relax!
and so on.....
Mods... if you have an idea of how the game should progress - shape it! Or it will die and die because you'll think "this is not what I wanted to mod"...

Israelite9191
Sep 11, 2006, 07:34 PM
Second reason: Dreaded Orders.
Consider this from the mods perspective:
You get 10-15 orders for a game. Three are illegible, six are 3-4 lines of text of "grow economy" type. Two are "roxxlololo" "I pwn all". Which normally leaves about 4-5 orders one can really enjoy reading and working with. Now where should the motivation come from? Obviously a mod does stories for those 4-5 nations only to get complaints from 10 other players as to why nothing interesting happened in their countries.
Perfectly worded, I am in complete agreement.

Birdjaguar
Sep 11, 2006, 08:44 PM
Yes I had forgotten about all the between update stuff. Thanks. Do you really get orders like "roxxlololo" "I pwn all"?

Israelite9191
Sep 11, 2006, 09:08 PM
Yes. There are many people who use internet speak etc.. I find those to be some of the most horrid things I have ever had displeasure of reading.

Lord_Iggy
Sep 11, 2006, 09:56 PM
Personally, I love simple orders. But there's no point in arguing which is better, for it's a simple difference in preference.

alex994
Sep 11, 2006, 10:12 PM
Well, I too would prefer simple orders, to write and read. :( But the truth is that it changes from mods to mods. Some mods prefer an excruciatingly detailed orders *looks at a certain mod* *cough* Symphony

TheBladeRoden
Sep 11, 2006, 11:19 PM
I get scared off by players who post thousand-word stories in every post.:mischief:

LittleBoots
Sep 11, 2006, 11:20 PM
You don't have to read them ;) Although if the topic interests you, it can be a lot of fun. Reference Panda's long speeches or Symphony's recent constitution, which was a very nice, if very long, read.

Reno
Sep 11, 2006, 11:32 PM
Second reason: Dreaded Orders.
Consider this from the mods perspective:
You get 10-15 orders for a game. Three are illegible, six are 3-4 lines of text of "grow economy" type. Two are "roxxlololo" "I pwn all". Which normally leaves about 4-5 orders one can really enjoy reading and working with. Now where should the motivation come from? Obviously a mod does stories for those 4-5 nations only to get complaints from 10 other players as to why nothing interesting happened in their countries.

This was one, major, reason for me closing my recent NES.

Harleqin
Sep 12, 2006, 04:50 AM
I agree with much of what has been said. Right now my nes is very close to being shut down. Few players, lack of player interaction etc is a killer for me. I'd like to see the world start breathing, people forming alliances, negotiating, backstabbing etc.
As it is it appears to be close to dead simply because my motivation is rapidly vanishing as I can't see any real purpose in continuing. It is a real pity though as I have several surprises planned to happen later on.
I think the best example is that the update was posted yesterday and in the... what... 20 hours since there haven't even been a comment.

So, for my point I think the thing that kills a nes is lack of player participation which then lowers the mods motivation. There are exceptions of course, but that's how it is in general.

Oh, and I am in complete agreement with Gelion :)

Disenfrancised
Sep 12, 2006, 05:52 AM
I haven't gotten any "roxxlolo" type orders yet, which is something I'm rather thankful for :).

Kal'thzar
Sep 12, 2006, 06:40 AM
Swissbezerker never played in your NES's did he?

Lord_Iggy
Sep 12, 2006, 08:58 AM
I agree with much of what has been said. Right now my nes is very close to being shut down. Few players, lack of player interaction etc is a killer for me. I'd like to see the world start breathing, people forming alliances, negotiating, backstabbing etc.

Whoah, whoah. There's a ton of stuff going on with me, but it's all PMed.

I will work tirelessly to remotivate you Hq! Look, your NES is first on my sig!

Harleqin
Sep 12, 2006, 09:41 AM
Right, then go and post what a good update I wrote ;)

Captain2
Sep 12, 2006, 02:30 PM
Right, then go and post what a good update I wrote ;)
if it helps i did already :p

besides i've been in a fair bit of diplomacy in your nes, just its all secretive by PM

fog of war ;)

Birdjaguar
Sep 12, 2006, 11:07 PM
If mods played NPCs in a more assertive role (rather than responsive only) between updates, would that help players stay involved? and keep the public thread alive?

TheBladeRoden
Sep 12, 2006, 11:31 PM
I'm also intimidated by 200 page long threads :p

Lord_Iggy
Sep 13, 2006, 12:40 AM
I often play them aggressive or something, look at Gamorrea or Tsaya in LINESII. They definitely add interest to the game.

~Darkening~
Sep 13, 2006, 01:16 AM
Second reason: Dreaded Orders.
Consider this from the mods perspective:
You get 10-15 orders for a game. Three are illegible, six are 3-4 lines of text of "grow economy" type. Two are "roxxlololo" "I pwn all". Which normally leaves about 4-5 orders one can really enjoy reading and working with. Now where should the motivation come from? Obviously a mod does stories for those 4-5 nations only to get complaints from 10 other players as to why nothing interesting happened in their countries.

Eh, my orders tend to be of the second type because i rarely have the time to go through long, winded orders. I have one day a week- most often sunday nights- that I really have the time to go through it all, think about the posibilities, and come up with a strategy.(which now I try to send all orders I need to on). I never complain if I send crappy orders and i have a small/little section- its what you get for your effot. Plus, for those that havr ever actually spoken with me, you'd know that I hate typos.

As for stories, I hate posting anything under two-thousand- its not worth it. But sadly, the quality in my works (which was already in short supply), has fallen to nothing recently.

Harleqin
Sep 13, 2006, 01:21 AM
I think the most important thing with orders are clarity. I like getting some details in them to help with the update, but too many details can be daunting. Problem with too many details is also if it doesn't work as the player wants... then there might be complaints later ;)

Lord_Iggy
Sep 13, 2006, 09:57 AM
Plus, for those that havr ever actually spoken with me, you'd know that I hate typos.:lol:

I agree with Hq here.

North King
Sep 13, 2006, 01:36 PM
If mods played NPCs in a more assertive role (rather than responsive only) between updates, would that help players stay involved? and keep the public thread alive?

Not really. My NPCs, as many have told me, are the absolute worst (read: best) NPCs in all of the forums; that is, they act the most like human players, which I take as the highest compliment. And yet... well, you know about my NES life expectancy.

Birdjaguar
Sep 13, 2006, 07:09 PM
Not really. My NPCs, as many have told me, are the absolute worst (read: best) NPCs in all of the forums; that is, they act the most like human players, which I take as the highest compliment. And yet... well, you know about my NES life expectancy.There is agreessive participation in the thread between updates to lure players into discussions and then there is aggressive NPC play that shows in the update results. I assume you mean the latter. ;)

North King
Sep 13, 2006, 07:13 PM
I mean both. :p

Birdjaguar
Sep 13, 2006, 07:56 PM
I cannot imagine why players don't like that, unless you constantly frustrate their plans. But that is not like you, is it?

North King
Sep 13, 2006, 08:04 PM
Oh, they don't mind that, I don't think; I think they mind that I have a social life. :p

Israelite9191
Sep 14, 2006, 12:39 AM
I try to make my NPCs extraordinariliy hard to defeat. If you ever waged a war against an NPC in one of my NESes, you know what I am talking about.

das
Sep 14, 2006, 05:20 AM
I think they mind that I have a social life.

Yes; I'm boycotting all your NESes until you quit that "social life" thing you've been talking about. :p

North King
Sep 14, 2006, 02:53 PM
Yes; I'm boycotting all your NESes until you quit that "social life" thing you've been talking about. :p

Won't be any different.

:rolleyes:

:p

Dachs
Sep 14, 2006, 04:56 PM
Yes; I'm boycotting all your NESes until you quit that "social life" thing you've been talking about. :p
Speaking of which, where do you get all of this free time you use for updates, althists, and all else?

Responding that you're "dead" won't get me off your back. Polar bears can reanimate dead tissue, you know. ;)

das
Sep 15, 2006, 03:39 AM
By not having a social life, duh. ;) Never particularily had it (not counting school, but that's still in), don't really need it. :p

That and I was never born, am dead, and sold my soul to Devil (God should've offered more).

Swissempire
Sep 15, 2006, 04:26 PM
Das, do you go to the New Economic School in Russia. Because then you would be a TRUE NESer:lol: