View Full Version : Anybody Got (Or Working Towards) a Degree in the Physicial Sciences?


Babbler
Feb 04, 2008, 03:41 PM
Like Abandon's thread only for biology degrees, but for the physical sciences (e.g. physics, chemistry, etc.).

What your degree and how has your career afterwards evolved?

Genocidicbunny
Feb 04, 2008, 05:09 PM
Well, seeing as I am in high school, Im not really working towards a degree per se, but I do plan to do something with chemistry when I do get into college.

MrCynical
Feb 04, 2008, 05:31 PM
I'm in my last year of a chemistry degree. As to where my career is going, it'll depend on whether I can get funding for further study.

Riffraff
Feb 04, 2008, 05:47 PM
I'm in my third year studying physics. I don't know what kind of career I'm gonna be heading for, but I know that anything to do with theoretical physics is outside my mathematical abilities.

CivGeneral
Feb 04, 2008, 07:24 PM
I only have an associates in Marine Science that is anything remotely related to Physical Science.

aaglo
Feb 05, 2008, 03:19 AM
I've got a degree on civil engineering, but it hardly counts as a physics degree... well, grunt-physics maybe... :)

woodelf
Feb 05, 2008, 04:40 AM
I have a BS in Chemistry

JerichoHill
Feb 05, 2008, 05:49 AM
I minored in Biology

ArneHD
Feb 05, 2008, 08:36 AM
I'm currently studying for a masters degree in geology.

Joe Harker
Feb 05, 2008, 08:44 AM
I am studying chemistry and physics a level hoping to do motersport engineering! :)

Mise
Feb 05, 2008, 01:29 PM
I have a Physics degree, graduated in June 2006. My first job was with an Energy company, as a reporting analyst (spreadsheets, basically). I'm now working at the Diamond Trading Company (the commericial arm of DeBeers) as a Pricing analyst.

Genocidicbunny
Feb 05, 2008, 04:29 PM
I have a Physics degree, graduated in June 2006. My first job was with an Energy company, as a reporting analyst (spreadsheets, basically). I'm now working at the Diamond Trading Company (the commericial arm of DeBeers) as a Pricing analyst.

How does that tie in with Physics?

xienwolf
Feb 06, 2008, 07:43 AM
As someone working on his PhD in Physics I can answer that maybe :)

If you tell someone you have a Physics degree, their eyes sort of glaze over, and they don't hear anything you say for the next 12 minutes or so. After that they assume you are smart and trainable, so they hire you for whatever random thing they have an opening for and the last person didn't do well. Now they can brag that they have a Physicist working for them, even though you don't use your degree at all ;)

Padma
Feb 06, 2008, 09:46 AM
I'll vouch for xienwolf on this. As I mentioned in the other thread, I got a BS in Chemistry and Biology (double major), and ended up working first, in munitions maintenance, and since, as a professional computer geek.

I got the munitions job in part because of my hard science degree, but in reality what it required was a business degree.

In essence, unless you look for and get a specific science-based job, most employers just assume that if you got a degree you are "trainable", and are willing to hire you for any random position.

Bartleby
Feb 06, 2008, 09:54 AM
I have a BSc and PhD in chemistry. Currently I'm working as an academic post-doc.

Truronian
Feb 06, 2008, 10:16 AM
I'm in my second year of a maths degree in which I'm taking predominantly physics options... don't know if that counts.

Mise
Feb 06, 2008, 02:26 PM
As someone working on his PhD in Physics I can answer that maybe :)

If you tell someone you have a Physics degree, their eyes sort of glaze over, and they don't hear anything you say for the next 12 minutes or so. After that they assume you are smart and trainable, so they hire you for whatever random thing they have an opening for and the last person didn't do well. Now they can brag that they have a Physicist working for them, even though you don't use your degree at all ;)

I'll vouch for xienwolf on this. As I mentioned in the other thread, I got a BS in Chemistry and Biology (double major), and ended up working first, in munitions maintenance, and since, as a professional computer geek.

I got the munitions job in part because of my hard science degree, but in reality what it required was a business degree.

In essence, unless you look for and get a specific science-based job, most employers just assume that if you got a degree you are "trainable", and are willing to hire you for any random position.

Well, that was certainly 100% true for my first job after graduating, and for most of the other graduates I've met since, but my current job really does use a lot of the maths/stats I learnt...

Basically I do statistical modelling, with a smattering of business/strategic planning/modelling. I work with an Engineer and a Mathematician -- the maths skills we respectively possess are pretty important in our department.

However, the thing that really makes you stand out from all the other mathsy/sciency people is a good grasp of the business, and the ability to communicate your ideas effectively. If you want to switch away from sciency/techy stuff and into the really interesting decision making/strategic stuff then the first thing you should do is learn to talk the talk. Second thing is get an MBA from a good business school.

brennan
Feb 08, 2008, 05:38 AM
As someone working on his PhD in Physics I can answer that maybe :)

If you tell someone you have a Physics degree, their eyes sort of glaze over, and they don't hear anything you say for the next 12 minutes or so. After that they assume you are smart and trainable, so they hire you for whatever random thing they have an opening for and the last person didn't do well. Now they can brag that they have a Physicist working for them, even though you don't use your degree at all ;)QFT. The bit where they give you a job never seems to happen though. Just the eyes glazing over. :(

Hey Mise, let's 'network': Get me a decent job willya i'm bored of this crap. :)

BSc (Hons) 2:2. 'Physics with Electronics and Computing'.

I come under Abaddon's 'lazy' category - I got top marks all the way through my first year, then got bored when my marks actually started to count. :blush:

ainwood
Feb 08, 2008, 05:06 PM
I have a degree in Chemical & Process Engineering. It is actually required for my job, but general business and management skills are required, as well as on-the-job experience. I don't use much of my degree specifically day-to-day, but do draw on the theoretical side at time.

Enkidu Warrior
Feb 10, 2008, 02:40 AM
I have an undergraduate masters in Physics. I'm currently an English teacher. I'll probably teach Science or Maths at some point in the future.

The Fjonis
Feb 10, 2008, 04:32 AM
I'm in my second year, working my way towards a Master's in nanotechnology. This spring I need to decide whether to focus on bionanotech, material science or electronics. I'm torn between the first two..