View Full Version : Does computer performance affect streaming video?


Mr. Keith
Feb 15, 2009, 05:13 PM
Or is it solely your internet connection?

I just get annoyed with choppy videos.

civ_king
Feb 15, 2009, 05:23 PM
I think it is both, you need a good 'net connection so you can watch it correctly but then you need a good video card

Mr. Keith
Feb 15, 2009, 05:33 PM
good video card

Really.

My computer just has integrated video. Are you telling me that a video card would actually improve my youtubing experience?

aimeeandbeatles
Feb 15, 2009, 06:20 PM
Flash video is very lossy anyways.

Unless the FPS in the video is higher than the FPS on your video card, it shouldn't affect it too much. (It's usually around 25 or 30 on videos, depending on if its PAL or NTSC.) I think you only need a good video card if you're going into the high-def stuff.

Zelig
Feb 15, 2009, 06:51 PM
Your video card has absolutely no effect on streaming video.

CPU speed on low end machines might, open up the task manager, and see if your web browser is at 100% cpu usage to check.

Otherwise, it's your connection. (Or the streaming site)

Aramazd
Feb 15, 2009, 07:03 PM
Your video card has absolutely no effect on streaming video.
IIRC, Flash 10 has gpu acceleration

CPU speed on low end machines might, open up the task manager, and see if your web browser is at 100% cpu usage to check.
Yep.
Otherwise, it's your connection. (Or the streaming site)
Yep.

Flash video is very lossy anyways.
Flash is h.264...
Unless the FPS in the video is higher than the FPS on your video card, it shouldn't affect it too much. (It's usually around 25 or 30 on videos, depending on if its PAL or NTSC.) I think you only need a good video card if you're going into the high-def stuff.
What?

Genocidicbunny
Feb 15, 2009, 07:37 PM
Its both, your connection and your computer. My crappy old laptop can barely play flash video with no stuttering. If you have a slow connection though, it will have to constantly pause to download more of the video too though.

aimeeandbeatles
Feb 15, 2009, 07:40 PM
Whenever I've encoded videos to flash video, there's always been a significant decrease in quality. And I've used different encoders.

And the FPS (frames per second) thing -- Sometimes, when my video card driver craps out on me, I have to use the default VGA one. And it has a low FPS, so some videos look a bit choppy on it, whether or not its streaming.

Zelig
Feb 15, 2009, 07:59 PM
IIRC, Flash 10 has gpu acceleration

Hey, so it does, I should check out if it's any good, for future reference...

CoreAVC also just included hardware acceleration via Cuda in their latest release, haven't tried it yet, but it sounds very promising.

Aramazd
Feb 16, 2009, 02:27 AM
Whenever I've encoded videos to flash video, there's always been a significant decrease in quality. And I've used different encoders.
H.264 was added a while ago. Prior to that it used something elsel

And the FPS (frames per second) thing -- Sometimes, when my video card driver craps out on me, I have to use the default VGA one. And it has a low FPS, so some videos look a bit choppy on it, whether or not its streaming.
It's probably your CPU.

GVBN
Feb 16, 2009, 02:57 AM
Most streaming videos are so low resolution and low bitrate that processor speed isn't going to matter

aimeeandbeatles
Feb 16, 2009, 05:59 AM
It's probably your CPU.
No, as it's only when I use the default VGA drivers.

Aramazd
Feb 16, 2009, 01:08 PM
No, as it's only when I use the default VGA drivers.
Well it's not you GPU, so I don't know what to tell you.

Most streaming videos are so low resolution and low bitrate that processor speed isn't going to matter
I always here about flash taking a large amount of cpu time, especially on OS X and nix. Even on windows it takes a lot of processor time; I imagine on older CPUs it would be really bad.

aimeeandbeatles
Feb 16, 2009, 01:13 PM
Okay -- suppose you have a very low frame rate with your video card. If the frame rate on the video is higher, it'll be choppy. No matter what GPU you have.

Aramazd
Feb 16, 2009, 01:14 PM
Okay -- suppose you have a very low frame rate with your video card. If the frame rate on the video is higher, it'll be choppy. No matter what GPU you have.
What the hell are you talking about?

aimeeandbeatles
Feb 16, 2009, 01:15 PM
It's like trying to film a motor race with a video camera which has only 10 fps. Or how some video animations are. choppy.

Aramazd
Feb 16, 2009, 01:18 PM
It's like trying to film a motor race with a video camera which has only 10 fps. Or how some video animations are. choppy.
I'm still not following; a video card doesn't have a set fps.

aimeeandbeatles
Feb 16, 2009, 01:28 PM
Well, the adaptor might.

Genocidicbunny
Feb 16, 2009, 04:02 PM
What? No. They dont. Video cards will display things as fast as they can. Camera's on the other hand may have a set fps. Older webcams didnt shoot at 24/30fps that you need for full motion, they shot at 10-15fps which made them stuttery, but it was good enough to convey motion.

In short, I have no idea why you think GPU's have a set framerate, cus they dont. They'll display things as fast as they can.

aimeeandbeatles
Feb 16, 2009, 04:12 PM
Yes, and if "as fast as it can" is slower than the videos' framerate, it'll be slow.

Maybe I'm getting confused with the monitors refresh rate.

The lousy default adaptor is the one you get if you disable your regular display adaptor in device manager. The VGA one.

Genocidicbunny
Feb 16, 2009, 04:20 PM
Yeah I have a feeling you're confusing some things.
Monitor refresh rate -- only really matters on CRT displays, causes flickering of the monitor when it's too low. LCD's aren't affected by this.
Fast as it can actually refers to things that use the GPU. Flash video is not one of those things. It is your processor that does all of the work unless you have a card that can assist with GPU acceleration. Even then, you're cpu bound. Your GPU is still effectively displaying 2D content so its not going to be very stressed, therefore your stuttering is because of something else.
That lousy adapter is just the default windows one. On Windows Vista its actually relatively powerful ( No Aero, but it can easily drive a 1680x1050 resolution with no slowdown unlike the XP one)

aimeeandbeatles
Feb 16, 2009, 04:26 PM
Yeh, the XP one is the one I'm talking about. And its not unique to streaming videos, any video comes out choppy with the lousy one.

Another way to test if its connection is to download the videos as a FLV file and play it in VLC or some other player and see if its choppy then.

Genocidicbunny
Feb 16, 2009, 04:28 PM
The default XP one is barely enough for 2D 1024x768.

aimeeandbeatles
Feb 16, 2009, 04:30 PM
I only use it when my regular (crummy, integrated) GPU's driver is being fussy.

Genocidicbunny
Feb 16, 2009, 04:32 PM
On that topic, have you ever tried using Omega drivers? They may be more stable than the default ATi/Manuf. ones.

aimeeandbeatles
Feb 16, 2009, 04:39 PM
I've heard about them, but I wasn't too sure what they were for.

Genocidicbunny
Feb 16, 2009, 05:14 PM
Basically, a guy went and took the default ATi/nVidia drivers and modified them for better stability, etc. I remember on my old PC I had problems running Spore -- really bad artifacting. Went and installed the most up-to-date omega drivers and presto, everything worked fine.

aimeeandbeatles
Feb 16, 2009, 05:24 PM
I'll take a look at them, thanks. :)

aimeeandbeatles
Feb 16, 2009, 06:29 PM
Downloading the Omega drivers, gonna install them tomorrow when I'm not so tired.

Shadylookin
Feb 16, 2009, 07:00 PM
I imagine its computer performance assuming you have a reasonable buffer

Mr. Keith
Feb 20, 2009, 04:06 PM
FWIW, I was just watching a video review on gamespot.com, and it was running quite choppy, and the Windows Task Manager had my CPU usage at 100% for the duration of the video.

Aramazd
Feb 20, 2009, 05:47 PM
FWIW, I was just watching a video review on gamespot.com, and it was running quite choppy, and the Windows Task Manager had my CPU usage at 100% for the duration of the video.
That's your problem. You're going to need a better CPU.