View Full Version : The many questions-not-worth-their-own-thread question thread XVIII


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Traitorfish
Mar 08, 2012, 11:36 AM
"Wrinkly old people"? I remember when mouse wheels first appeared. :(

(But I was like 8 at the time so all I thought was "ha, this mouse has a wheel, how about that").

Flying Pig
Mar 08, 2012, 11:38 AM
To all you wrinkly old people out there, what did you think of the mouse wheel when it first started appearing?

When I first got a computer I scrolled using the bar at the side of the page; only recently started using the wheel

flyingchicken
Mar 08, 2012, 11:41 AM
"Wrinkly old people"? I remember when mouse wheels first appeared. :(

(But I was like 8 at the time so all I thought was "ha, this mouse has a wheel, how about that").Contention put forth, contention addressed. :p
When I first got a computer I scrolled using the bar at the side of the page; only recently started using the wheelYou're reputably so old I'm not sure if "recently" here means a decade or two.

--

I ask because I imagine it was a "rolleyes just a gimmick" sort of reaction that was later reassessed and I need to validate my imagination.

say1988
Mar 08, 2012, 11:47 AM
I ask because I imagine it was a "rolleyes just a gimmick" sort of reaction that was later reassessed and I need to validate my imagination.
Typical resistance to change and acceptance once you find its value.

Flying Pig
Mar 08, 2012, 11:55 AM
Contention put forth, contention addressed. :p
You're reputably so old I'm not sure if "recently" here means a decade or two.
.

I'm not that old - didn't have a computer until about five years ago!

bombshoo
Mar 08, 2012, 12:24 PM
I ask because I imagine it was a "rolleyes just a gimmick" sort of reaction that was later reassessed and I need to validate my imagination.

If anyone actually believes that, it's not that bad. My grandfather thinks the internet is a gimmick.

Arakhor
Mar 09, 2012, 06:49 AM
I remember when optical mice were cutting edge and cost a fortune. A three-button mouse was a great improvement to my computer life.

aronnax
Mar 09, 2012, 07:02 AM
Why are my favourite US TV shows skipping a week on their air date?

Cutlass
Mar 09, 2012, 07:16 AM
Why are my favourite US TV shows skipping a week on their air date?


Because they have a full year of programming to air and most shows only produce at most 22 episodes a year. In the distance past they would go through 26 weeks of new, followed by 26 weeks of repeats. Now they mix it up so that some of the new air just a month or 2 before the new season, and each season has fewer episodes.

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 09, 2012, 07:28 AM
Question:

Is it possible for ibuprofen capsules to cause raging diarrhoea? Its the only thing in common between this time and the last time i got it because now Im eating solid food. I could only find side effect for small children.

Cutlass
Mar 09, 2012, 07:30 AM
Question:

Is it possible for ibuprofen capsules to cause raging diarrhoea? Its the only thing in common between this time and the last time i got it because now Im eating solid food. I could only find side effect for small children.

Only if you have some sort of allergy. Try a different pain reliever for a while and see if you get a different result.

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 09, 2012, 07:30 AM
Well the arthritis pills don't work very well on headaches and those are the only two I have.

Also the ibuprofen is not the brand i usually get. I usually get a store-brand tablets from one store. This time I got store-brand "gel capsules" from another store.

Cutlass
Mar 09, 2012, 07:33 AM
Get some excederine or tylanol.

GinandTonic
Mar 09, 2012, 08:13 AM
Ibuprofen is the name of the drug. Branded ibuprofen is a completely pointless waste of money. 500 mg of ibuprofen is, by law, quite exactly identical in every way if it's the generic chemist/ supermarket own brand or the 10x as expensive name brand.

Never take ibuprofen on an empty stomach. My Auntie works in drug development and happily gave the cats left over antibiotics to her son. Every time she comes back to the uk she picks up generic ibuprofen since this is either impossible to get in france or just oddly the same price as branded. She is religious about the no-ibuprofen-on-an-empty-stomach thing.

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 09, 2012, 08:20 AM
Well, I usually get the plain tablets. This time I got these capsules (I was at a different store) and I think there is something inside the capsule that does not agree with me.

I don't bother with any of the fancy brands like Advil. My arthritis pills are Tylenol because thats what the doctor gave me.

I didnt have the pills on an empty stomach either. The one time I tried that i regretted it.

carmen510
Mar 09, 2012, 06:36 PM
Why do women seem to think that when a man urinates, it comes out like a laser beam rather than a random stream?

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 09, 2012, 07:28 PM
Why do women seem to think that when a man urinates, it comes out like a laser beam rather than a random stream?

Well why else would they have such tiny cups for urine tests?

Synsensa
Mar 09, 2012, 07:35 PM
Well why else would they have such tiny cups for urine tests?

Us men hold the cup very very close, or at least I do. I make sure the tip of my urination equipment (Yay for avoiding using a naughty word) is at least in the cup so as to avoid spilling.

In fact, I'd say we have more problems stopping than the actual act.

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 09, 2012, 07:36 PM
Well how are females supposed to get their pee into the little cup. It just goes everywhere down your leg even which is pretty nasty.

salty mud
Mar 10, 2012, 03:34 AM
http://cdn.thesandtrap.com/9/9d/9d7c9aff_128863681269636988.jpg

Question: What is the average amount of languages a person knows? On a global scale, are people generally monolingual or multilingual?

gangleri2001
Mar 10, 2012, 09:11 AM
Question: What is the average amount of languages a person knows? On a global scale, are people generally monolingual or multilingual?

From what I've been told it looks like monolingualism is majoritary.

salty mud
Mar 10, 2012, 12:28 PM
Are paid surveys worth it? They sound too good to be true.

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 10, 2012, 12:30 PM
Are paid surveys worth it? They sound too good to be true.

I was under the impression you only got a few pennies

AL_DA_GREAT
Mar 11, 2012, 04:58 AM
http://www.ynetnews.com/PicServer2/20122005/906619/AM17_wa.jpg

How does one tie a scarf like this?

Quackers
Mar 11, 2012, 08:20 AM
Converted ?!

NedimNapoleon
Mar 11, 2012, 09:38 AM
Like this, its a ninja style I know how to tie it, this is how you do it with a shirt but its the same with a scarf.

e4NoKfrQ9tw

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 11, 2012, 02:50 PM
What is walk-in ammonia? Also is it contagious

AL_DA_GREAT
Mar 11, 2012, 03:15 PM
What is walk-in ammonia?

It might be walk in pneumonia. It means that you have pneumonia (a lung disease) and that you are still standing.

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 11, 2012, 05:22 PM
That makes sense. It sounded like "walk-in ammonia" and I thought it was some sort of cleaner poisoning or something.

Can you crack a ceiling with very loud sounds? I was reading something and it mentioned that.

MagisterCultuum
Mar 11, 2012, 06:37 PM
It is not walk-in pneumonia, but walking pneumonia. While I too was thinking it referred to an inflammatory infection of the lungs not severe enough to leave one bedridden, but it seems thatit actually refers to any pneumonia not caused by the kinds of pathogens that typically cause it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walking_pneumonia


Loud enough sound of the proper frequency can break just about anything.

Cutlass
Mar 11, 2012, 06:44 PM
It would probably take at least low grade commercial amplifiers to crack plaster. A home system isn't going to do it.

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 11, 2012, 06:57 PM
How about a very loud concert in a high school auditorium? I will pm details

Cutlass
Mar 11, 2012, 07:01 PM
If they used amplifiers and speakers made for a larger venue.

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 11, 2012, 07:03 PM
Actually I was talking to a friend (just got email) who mentioned that its likely the building was damaged anyways.

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 12, 2012, 07:35 PM
What does this say? I'm not even sure what language its in.

http://i.imgbox.com/aacqwlyn.jpg

Verarde
Mar 12, 2012, 07:37 PM
Looks like a form of Aurebesh from Star Wars, but it isn't.
http://images.wikia.com/starwars/images/8/88/Aurebesh_TWW.jpg

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 12, 2012, 07:38 PM
I think its just the font, to be honest

Cutlass
Mar 12, 2012, 08:15 PM
If it's a font, get a big list of fonts and match it up.

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 12, 2012, 08:20 PM
No its a different language. That I know for certain

Cutlass
Mar 12, 2012, 08:26 PM
Airliners often take routes that are not straight lines between locations. How, or where, do you find out the airline miles between 2 cities as opposed to the straight line?

PlutonianEmpire
Mar 12, 2012, 08:48 PM
Airliners often take routes that are not straight lines between locations. How, or where, do you find out the airline miles between 2 cities as opposed to the straight line?
Airliners are required to use "waypoints", like, they fly to that waypoint, and continue on to the next. These waypoints are actually specialized radio transmitters, using a special set of frequency system that airplane navigation systems tune to. It's designed to regulate traffic. Adding up the distances between each waypoint, including from the departure airport to the first waypoint, and the last waypoint to the arrival airport (obviously :lol: ). For overseas flights, they use latitude/longitude coordinates entered on the GPS as waypoints.

And it's not "often", because it is actually mandatory. :)

http://www.flightaware.com may be able to help. :)

You type in a flight number, or you enter a departure and arrival airport. :)

On the right of the screen, you'll see the flight details, including the distance in miles from direct, and distance in miles with the waypoints included.

Cutlass
Mar 12, 2012, 08:53 PM
I was thinking like NY London, not the dumb US rules, but thanks, that helps a bit.

PlutonianEmpire
Mar 12, 2012, 08:58 PM
I was thinking like NY London, not the dumb US rules, but thanks, that helps a bit.
The website does do international flights, as well as other countries' domestic flights. But I think you noticed it already. :)

Huayna Capac357
Mar 12, 2012, 09:09 PM
What does this say? I'm not even sure what language its in.

http://i.imgbox.com/aacqwlyn.jpg

That is in Japanese.

But I don't read Japanese. I think amadeus does?

aimeeandbeatles
Mar 12, 2012, 09:10 PM
Thank you. But what does it say? If I could copy/paste it I would have put it in Google Translate auto-detect language a long time ago.

MagisterCultuum
Mar 12, 2012, 10:48 PM
I'm pretty sure it is Japanese too, specifically in the Katakana (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katakana) syllabary that is used largely for the transcription of foreign words.

My elementary school taught Japanese rather than a more useul language, but we never got very far and I don't remember much. At one point I could have read most of those characters aloud phonetically, but that probably wouldn't help either of us understand it unless it turns out to be an English sentence transscribed in kana.

_random_
Mar 12, 2012, 10:55 PM
So I have a friend who's planning to study architecture in college. He's faced with the following options:
1) Go to Bowling Green State University, get a bachelor's, graduate with 4000 dollars debt.
2) Go to community college in Columbus to get an associate's, get a bachelor's at Ohio State University, graduate debt-free.

Which is preferable?

madviking
Mar 12, 2012, 11:05 PM
Uh what are the relative rankings of the architecture programmes?

CivGeneral
Mar 12, 2012, 11:13 PM
What does this say? I'm not even sure what language its in.

http://i.imgbox.com/aacqwlyn.jpg

That's Katakana. One of the writing systems in Japan.

It says:
"Tomu Petei & Haato Bureikaazu / Isotou za gereeto watado oopuso"

The first part is obviously Tom Petty and Heart Breakers. Haato phonetically sounds similar to heart and Buureikaazu phonetically sounds similar to breaker.

dIZZyBlIZZy
Mar 13, 2012, 01:11 AM
So I have a friend who's planning to study architecture in college. He's faced with the following options:
1) Go to Bowling Green State University, get a bachelor's, graduate with 4000 dollars debt.
2) Go to community college in Columbus to get an associate's, get a bachelor's at Ohio State University, graduate debt-free.

Which is preferable?

Two things to consider. Since madviking covered the first, I'll go into the second. If he wanted option 1, has he started filling out his scholarship applications yet?

Cutlass
Mar 13, 2012, 07:42 AM
So I have a friend who's planning to study architecture in college. He's faced with the following options:
1) Go to Bowling Green State University, get a bachelor's, graduate with 4000 dollars debt.
2) Go to community college in Columbus to get an associate's, get a bachelor's at Ohio State University, graduate debt-free.

Which is preferable?


He could go to Yale and graduate with $200,000 debt. :mischief:

_random_
Mar 13, 2012, 07:45 AM
He actually got accepted into Columbia, but decided against the Ivy League for just that reason.

Quackers
Mar 13, 2012, 10:42 AM
His whole premise is faulty, he wants to study architecture?! Ya know that degree where like <5% of graduates actually work in that area after graduation; if he fails to get an architecturel degree he will be stuck competing with art graduates, graphical design graduates for some art job because thats like..well..the only skill you learn (all you do is design, draw and build models and create buildings on a computer).

Anyway thats an extremely negative POV, nonetheless one which should be considered IMO :D

Michkov
Mar 13, 2012, 02:12 PM
Airliners often take routes that are not straight lines between locations. How, or where, do you find out the airline miles between 2 cities as opposed to the straight line?

Due to the Earth being a sphere straight paths appear to be a curve on a flat map. So the shortest distance is the arc like path. You my want to read up about Great Circles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_circle)

Traitorfish
Mar 14, 2012, 02:12 PM
His whole premise is faulty, he wants to study architecture?! Ya know that degree where like <5% of graduates actually work in that area after graduation; if he fails to get an architecturel degree he will be stuck competing with art graduates, graphical design graduates for some art job because thats like..well..the only skill you learn (all you do is design, draw and build models and create buildings on a computer
Not an unfair observation, but what professional degree isn't this true of? People who never get past undergrad in medicine, engineering or law are in exactly the same boat, and without even having the same range of transferable skills.

(I would add, though, that the exact skill-set depends on the exact program: some places are almost entirely design-focused, true, but others have a heavier technical slant. Taking a provincial example, an undergrad degree from the Glasgow School of Art would come with the skill-set you describe, but one from Strathclyde would come with a lot of engineering and building technology, which can lead you to work in a number of other careers in the construction industry.)

dIZZyBlIZZy
Mar 14, 2012, 10:24 PM
Not an unfair observation, but what professional degree isn't this true of? People who never get past undergrad in medicine, engineering or law are in exactly the same boat, and without even having the same range of transferable skills.

(I would add, though, that the exact skill-set depends on the exact program: some places are almost entirely design-focused, true, but others have a heavier technical slant. Taking a provincial example, an undergrad degree from the Glasgow School of Art would come with the skill-set you describe, but one from Strathclyde would come with a lot of engineering and building technology, which can lead you to work in a number of other careers in the construction industry.)

As you (seemingly) implied, it's mostly true, but not entirely. I have two degrees with no postgraduate study. One in criminal justice, and now I work in the penal system. The other is in avian zoology. While I'm certified to care for wild animals, without veterinary studies, I cannot do any surgery. Just to give live examples.

Question for any and all willing to help. GF & I have vacation coming (27 April - 12 May to be exact). We are just starting to make plans, but she's never been to a stage production (you know, a play). The one I'd love to take her to is "HMS Pinafore" (never seen it done myself). Do any CFCers in ConUS know if it would be playing in your area in that time frame?

Crezth
Mar 14, 2012, 10:51 PM
Due to the Earth being a sphere straight paths appear to be a curve on a flat map. So the shortest distance is the arc like path. You my want to read up about Great Circles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_circle)

Passenger aircraft don't normally take the "shortest route," however, so the actual number of miles an aircraft travels is usually a little inflated.

Furthermore, due to climb and descent, in most cases you can't even express the shortest route using arcs of spheres.

PlutonianEmpire
Mar 15, 2012, 12:38 AM
I heard earlier today that a while back, a foreign government official was on a state trip to the US, and after giving a speech, forgot to turn off the mic, and was overheard saying something negative about everyday citizens, calling them "petty commoners" or "little people", and basically being a snob, IIRC. Who was that, which country was he from, and when did that happen?

AL_DA_GREAT
Mar 15, 2012, 02:42 AM
Swedish architecture schools have a good system. In Sweden it is an engineering and a masters degree. Th official title is Bachelor of engineering science in architecture and masters of engineering in architecture.

See if a program like that exists in the US. Failed architects here work as engineers.

Skwink
Mar 17, 2012, 11:51 PM
Nvrmind

GinandTonic
Mar 18, 2012, 04:21 PM
Does adult education help mental health issues, and if so what evidence is there to support such a statement?

Perhaps more importantly, what does Downtown say?

madviking
Mar 19, 2012, 11:31 AM
Why is Apple paying a stock dividend to get its shares back?

say1988
Mar 19, 2012, 11:33 AM
That doesn't make sense. A stock dividend directly increaes the number of outstanding shares.

madviking
Mar 19, 2012, 11:37 AM
That doesn't make sense. A stock dividend directly increaes the number of outstanding shares.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-17434328

This is the article I read.

say1988
Mar 19, 2012, 11:42 AM
A quick google shows that it is a cash dividend (the first in nearly a decade) and a separate stock buyback. A stock dividends is a when shareholders are given more stock.

Apple has a ton of cash sitting around and simply decided to give it to investors via the two primary means available.
It will further encourage some investors that prefer companies paying dividends to get involved.

They could theoretically have given out a very large dividend to acheive the same effect (minus the stock price increase due to decreasing supply), but would create an expectation of higher dividends in the future (you usually want consistent dividends).

GinandTonic
Mar 22, 2012, 01:39 PM
Am I just being dense or is there really no thread for the toulouse terror siege and storming?

Joecoolyo
Mar 22, 2012, 02:25 PM
Am I just being dense or is there really no thread for the toulouse terror siege and storming?

I was going to make one, but homework snuck up and I haven't had the time.

I'm just as surprised as you are no else has made one.

Ceoladir
Mar 23, 2012, 06:35 PM
Okay, I've had a song stuck in my head for the last three days. Unfortunately, I can't remember a single word of it. Please help! Here are some clues.

Sound like it's 70's rock song.
The guitars have some overdrive.
It's a love song to some extent.
The last three words of the chorus are what make the song recognizable.

Any help?

Cutlass
Mar 23, 2012, 06:36 PM
Okay, I've had a song stuck in my head for the last three days. Unfortunately, I can't remember a single word of it. Please help! Here are some clues.

Sound like it's 70's rock song.
The guitars have some overdrive.
It's a love song to some extent.
The last three words of the chorus are what make the song recognizable.

Any help?




Way too vague... Got anything more?

Ceoladir
Mar 23, 2012, 06:45 PM
I was hoping somebody could start naming off songs. :p

IIRC, it's similar to "Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress" in terms of structure, though it has a heavier sound.

madviking
Mar 23, 2012, 09:50 PM
Roy Orbison - Oh, Pretty Woman

?

Ceoladir
Mar 23, 2012, 10:24 PM
It's not that. I'm sure I'll find it sooner or later.

Ceoladir
Mar 23, 2012, 10:29 PM
And it struck me!

iR2V60yLIaw

Cutlass
Mar 24, 2012, 06:46 AM
And it struck me!

iR2V60yLIaw


Yeah, that's very low on the list of what I would have guessed from what you said. :lol:

Disgustipated
Mar 24, 2012, 02:39 PM
Why is it rock music sounds better at loud volumes rather than low volumes? I worry about losing my hearing, but damn, I just want to rock out.

caketastydelish
Mar 24, 2012, 08:31 PM
Here's a question: I saw the "Karen" video in your sig Al the Great, but I don't understand what it's about.

mayor
Mar 26, 2012, 02:55 AM
Why is it rock music sounds better at loud volumes rather than low volumes? I worry about losing my hearing, but damn, I just want to rock out.

Because, for some reason, people will rock out easier on loud music and since people tend to listen to rock music is to rock out.

If you are afraid to lose your hearing I suggest wearing earplugs :)

salty mud
Mar 26, 2012, 02:58 AM
Doesn't that defeat the object of having the music loud? :lol:

rugbyLEAGUEfan
Mar 26, 2012, 02:59 AM
I've noticed a few posts lately about white nationalists on this forum . I've never really noticed . Anyone care to put their hands up ? Or can anyone name a few for me ?

mayor
Mar 26, 2012, 03:01 AM
Doesn't that defeat the object of having the music loud? :lol:

well, I don't wear earplugs since I find them annoying but there are earplugs on the market that keep the sensation of loud music without the music harming you ears.

mayor
Mar 26, 2012, 03:03 AM
I've noticed a few posts lately about white nationalists on this forum . I've never really noticed . Anyone care to put their hands up ? Or can anyone name a few for me ?

Are you asking who is a white nationalist or to point you to white nationalistic posts?

rugbyLEAGUEfan
Mar 26, 2012, 03:39 AM
Just wondering who they are . Are they self confessed or have they been called out on the basis of their posts yet deny it (I'm not suggesting the denials are implausible as I haven't seen the posts) .

mayor
Mar 26, 2012, 03:42 AM
hmm, I haven't noticed any.. but then again I am far behind in reading OT threads so... I'll keep an eye out.

azzaman333
Mar 26, 2012, 04:07 AM
I've noticed a few posts lately about white nationalists on this forum . I've never really noticed . Anyone care to put their hands up ? Or can anyone name a few for me ?

I think AL DA GREAT (http://forums.civfanatics.com/member.php?u=73469) is one.

taillesskangaru
Mar 26, 2012, 04:17 AM
He's a self-confessed one, but there are several more who are in denial.

Camikaze
Mar 26, 2012, 05:54 AM
If you have to discuss other posters, please do so via PM, not in public.

Ceoladir
Mar 26, 2012, 04:47 PM
Yeah, that's very low on the list of what I would have guessed from what you said. :lol:
Yeah, it's always helpful to remember a few of the words. :p

Mango Elephant
Mar 26, 2012, 05:08 PM
I have some homework to do in a class, and I'm having some difficulty. What amendment does making abortion illegal violate?

shadowplay
Mar 26, 2012, 05:25 PM
Probably the 9th.

Mango Elephant
Mar 26, 2012, 05:27 PM
Yeah, I think it's that one and the fourth. Thanks for your help!

madviking
Mar 26, 2012, 05:28 PM
I have some homework to do in a class, and I'm having some difficulty. What amendment does making abortion illegal violate?

Along with the XIV.

PlutonianEmpire
Mar 26, 2012, 10:41 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/global-warming-close-becoming-irreversible-scientists-173712450.html

When they say "irreversible", do they mean that Earth would be on a path to become another Venus?

salty mud
Mar 27, 2012, 03:08 AM
The world, geologically speaking, is in quite a cool period at the moment. Temperature rise and higher sea levels are a given, as it is a cycle that has repeated for millennia. Don't let the scientists fool you into thinking we are the cause of it. No amount of action is going to reverse millions of years of natural phenomena. The Earth is going to heat up, but it will just as sure cool down again.

Cutlass
Mar 27, 2012, 06:33 AM
The world, geologically speaking, is in quite a cool period at the moment. Temperature rise and higher sea levels are a given, as it is a cycle that has repeated for millennia. Don't let the scientists fool you into thinking we are the cause of it. No amount of action is going to reverse millions of years of natural phenomena. The Earth is going to heat up, but it will just as sure cool down again.


But it is possible, and is certainly happening, that human action forces the climate outside of natural trends.



When they say "irreversible", do they mean that Earth would be on a path to become another Venus?

Not likely. Venus is much closer to the sun and has a far denser atmosphere. And so can sustain more heat. What may happen is that human action makes the Earth an average hotter place for several centuries after we stop putting out so much greenhouse gasses. But it won't be 100s of degrees hotter. Possible 10s of degrees.

salty mud
Mar 27, 2012, 06:54 AM
But it is possible, and is certainly happening, that human action forces the climate outside of natural trends.

Maybe so, but as of yet there is no firm evidence that human causes are greatly exaggerating the greenhouse effect.




Not likely. Venus is much closer to the sun and has a far denser atmosphere. And so can sustain more heat. What may happen is that human action makes the Earth an average hotter place for several centuries after we stop putting out so much greenhouse gasses. But it won't be 100s of degrees hotter. Possible 10s of degrees.

I feel that "10s of degrees" is a gross overestimation. (Perhaps you mean Fahrenheit, in which case I apologise as I don't use that scale) But even so, tens of degrees Fahrenheit is still an optimistic figure for anthropogenic warming. But, only time will tell.

Cutlass
Mar 27, 2012, 07:07 AM
Maybe so, but as of yet there is no firm evidence that human causes are greatly exaggerating the greenhouse effect.


Not really. The science is really clear. The average atmospheric temperature is going to be higher, and human behavior is the cause. The exact effects of it are a still somewhat in dispute. But the core of the argument is settled.



I feel that "10s of degrees" is a gross overestimation. (Perhaps you mean Fahrenheit, in which case I apologise as I don't use that scale) But even so, tens of degrees Fahrenheit is still an optimistic figure for anthropogenic warming. But, only time will tell.

Well that depends on future behavior. You're right it's not too likely to be more than 10C degree warming. But if we want to remain under that threshold than we have to change our emissions patterns. Significantly.

SS-18 ICBM
Mar 28, 2012, 08:31 PM
How many military dictators (e.g. Field Marshal Ayub Khan of Pakistan) graduated from the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst? Feel free to list examples from other military academies also.

caketastydelish
Mar 28, 2012, 08:41 PM
I've asked this before but I didn't get an answer:

In Al_Da_Great's signature, there is a link that says "freedom for the karen people"

I clicked it and watched that entire video, but I'm still not sure who the "karen people" are, or where they are, other than I'm guessing somewhere in eastern asia. Does anybody know? :confused:

shadowplay
Mar 28, 2012, 08:43 PM
I've asked this before but I didn't get an answer:

In Al_Da_Great's signature, there is a link that says "freedom for the karen people"

I clicked it and watched that entire video, but I'm still not sure who the "karen people" are, or where they are, other than I'm guessing somewhere in eastern asia. Does anybody know? :confused:

http://www.karen.org.au/karen_people.htm

Ajidica
Mar 29, 2012, 07:11 AM
I've asked this before but I didn't get an answer:

In Al_Da_Great's signature, there is a link that says "freedom for the karen people"

I clicked it and watched that entire video, but I'm still not sure who the "karen people" are, or where they are, other than I'm guessing somewhere in eastern asia. Does anybody know? :confused:
Ethnic group in Myanmar currently getting oppressed by the ruling junta.
A lot of Karen refugees have come to Minnesota actually.

AL_DA_GREAT
Mar 29, 2012, 07:39 AM
Here's a question: I saw the "Karen" video in your sig Al the Great, but I don't understand what it's about.

The Karen video is about the Karen people (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karen_people) and their struggle for independence. They are a minority group in Burma who are oppressed by the regime. They have been fighting since 1948 for independence and have established independent areas.

The video was taken by a friend of mine who is a member of casapound, an italien organisation that has close contacts with the Karen people and actively support them.

Traitorfish
Mar 29, 2012, 07:51 AM
Wait, the neo-fascists who were connected with the Florence shooter? We learn more about you every day... :crazyeye:

AL_DA_GREAT
Mar 29, 2012, 08:01 AM
Wait, the neo-fascists who were connected with the Florence shooter? We learn more about you every day... :crazyeye:

Fascists yes, also they condemn the shooter.

Casapound runs a large aid organisation. They have aid in Burma, Africa, Serbia and good connections with the Palestinians. Casapound is very much based on aid. They provide apartments for homeless, they do relief work after natural disasters, hand out food and clothes to the poor. Casapound is not focused on activism, they focus on social issues, art and culture and building a community. They have many sports teams, clubs and social centers.

When I was in Italy I slept in several youth hostels run by casapound. I also helpt squated a building that they turned into a studio for local artists.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tf1BzLhmdHs

Quackers
Mar 29, 2012, 08:05 AM
Ehhhh, I don't really know what was happening in that video. People running upstairs and waving flags, but the music made it awesome.

Traitorfish
Mar 29, 2012, 08:09 AM
A social centre for fascists. Weird.

AL_DA_GREAT
Mar 29, 2012, 08:11 AM
Ehhhh, I don't really know what was happening in that video. People running upstairs and waving flags, but the music made it awesome.They are squating the buildings.

A social centre for fascists. Weird.

They have over 50 social centers in Italy. Nationalists and fascists have a lot of social centers. Most large European cities have one.

Traitorfish
Mar 29, 2012, 08:15 AM
I suppose it makes sense. Fascism always had a peculiar fascination with leftist activist-forms, so anywhere with a moderately strong autonomist mileu is bound to produce something of the sort. I can even see how you'd cobble together an ideological logic for it, a lot of natter about the spontaneity of the organic nation, the masses striving for blah blah blah in the absence of a charismatic leader, etc, etc.

salty mud
Mar 29, 2012, 09:15 AM
Do girls really appreciate it if you go up and make an effort to talk to them? Call me a grouch, but I'd probably be annoyed if someone just randomly started talking to me.

AL_DA_GREAT
Mar 29, 2012, 11:06 AM
Do girls really appreciate it if you go up and make an effort to talk to them? Call me a grouch, but I'd probably be annoyed if someone just randomly started talking to me.

They don't want men chasing them. It means that you are of lower value than them. You should exued confidence and that you easily can get women.

Verarde
Mar 29, 2012, 11:08 AM
Do girls really appreciate it if you go up and make an effort to talk to them? Call me a grouch, but I'd probably be annoyed if someone just randomly started talking to me.

The girls I know appreciate it when I talk to them, but also when I listen to them. Both are of equal importance, because it shows them that you can by a sounding board for their issues, while being able to provide something of relative interest to them.

Ceoladir
Mar 29, 2012, 07:15 PM
Okay, so I got a 26 on my ACT, and I want to get into the University of Michigan. Should I retake it?

Verarde
Mar 29, 2012, 07:21 PM
According to some research I did, average ACT scores there are 29-33.

Retake it. Especially with their 40% acceptance rate.

Joecoolyo
Mar 29, 2012, 07:24 PM
Okay, so I got a 26 on my ACT, and I want to get into the University of Michigan. Should I retake it?

I would.

I got a 28 and was deferred (still waiting on a final decision).

caketastydelish
Mar 29, 2012, 07:33 PM
Do girls really appreciate it if you go up and make an effort to talk to them? Call me a grouch, but I'd probably be annoyed if someone just randomly started talking to me.

I don't know about you, but if a girl randomly went up and talked to me, I would NOT find it annoying if either of two conditions are met:

1. I find the girl to be attractive
or 2. She is interesting/pleasant to talk to.

The same would go for girls, I would imagine. If she finds you attractive that helps, and if she enjoys talking to you that also helps.

madviking
Mar 29, 2012, 07:44 PM
Okay, so I got a 26 on my ACT, and I want to get into the University of Michigan. Should I retake it?

Yea, definitely.

//guy who is in college already

_random_
Mar 30, 2012, 12:10 PM
I want to get into the University of Michigan.
If you find yourself wanting things like this, I'm not sure how much better you can do.

Ceoladir
Mar 30, 2012, 01:55 PM
Touche. :p

PlutonianEmpire
Mar 30, 2012, 10:44 PM
If someone won the 640 million dollar megamillions lottery, and after paying the taxes, they donated it all to NASA, would that help at all?

Or, does the government not allow donations to NASA?

say1988
Mar 31, 2012, 05:42 AM
They have a budget of around $18 billion. $400 million won't make that much of a difference. It would approximately make up for the decrease from 2010 to 2011.

SS-18 ICBM
Mar 31, 2012, 05:43 PM
How many military dictators (e.g. Field Marshal Ayub Khan of Pakistan) graduated from the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst? Feel free to list examples from other military academies also.
Nobody knows? Ah well...

If someone won the 640 million dollar megamillions lottery, and after paying the taxes, they donated it all to NASA, would that help at all?

Or, does the government not allow donations to NASA?

You'll probably have to split it too with other winners who drew the same number.

Anyway, anybody know of any documented April Fool's changes that led to severe consequences or inconvenience for a significant number of people?

PlutonianEmpire
Mar 31, 2012, 05:45 PM
Nobody knows? Ah well...



You'll probably have to split it too with other winners who drew the same number.

Anyway, anybody know of any documented April Fool's changes that led to severe consequences or inconvenience for a significant number of people?
I didn't win, thankfully*. :p

* Because I don't want publicity, and I don't think MN allows winners to be anonymous anyway. :p

Cutlass
Mar 31, 2012, 05:49 PM
Originally Posted by SS-18 ICBM View Post
How many military dictators (e.g. Field Marshal Ayub Khan of Pakistan) graduated from the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst? Feel free to list examples from other military academies also.

Post in the Ask A Soldier thread. Flying Pig knows more about Sandhurst than anyone else here.

NickyJ
Apr 01, 2012, 09:30 AM
Where is the latest movie you watched thread? The book thread?

shadowplay
Apr 01, 2012, 10:20 AM
Where is the latest movie you watched thread? The book thread?

They're both here. The book thread is on the 2nd page...

aimeeandbeatles
Apr 02, 2012, 05:33 PM
Is it a bad thing to skip meals if you are not hungry.

Cutlass
Apr 02, 2012, 05:49 PM
Generally no. You're body tells you what it needs much of the time, if you pay attention to it properly. Though sometimes it gives bad signals. But if you aren't hungry, and you aren't sick, then you don't really need food.

Ajidica
Apr 02, 2012, 06:56 PM
Okay, so I got a 26 on my ACT, and I want to get into the University of Michigan. Should I retake it?
I would. A good ACT score is always nice, especialy for state schools where any essays they may require are simply to weed out lazy people.

LegionSteve
Apr 04, 2012, 12:58 PM
Does anyone know how the UK alcohol licencing laws apply to supermarkets? Specifically, if I want to do my shopping at 7.00am before I go to work, can I buy a bottle of wine? I think pubs can't serve alcohol before 11.00am except for the few that have a 24 hour licence, but I have no idea how that works for supermarkets.

Arakhor
Apr 04, 2012, 01:14 PM
Supermarkets certainly do have limits on when they can sell alcohol, but I'm not sure what those are exactly.

mayor
Apr 05, 2012, 02:57 AM
Supermarkets certainly do have limits on when they can sell alcohol, but I'm not sure what those are exactly.

Really? You can't buy a bottle of wine in the supermarket as soon as they open?

LegionSteve
Apr 05, 2012, 04:42 AM
Really? You can't buy a bottle of wine in the supermarket as soon as they open?

Some of the big supermarket chains open 24 hours, except Sunday night when they close until Monday morning. That's what made me wonder how the licencing laws work. Maybe they have a 24 hour licence? But then, wouldn't they get flooded with drunks when the pubs close? It seems no-one here knows, and no-one in RL knows either, so maybe I will email Tesco and ask them.

Traitorfish
Apr 05, 2012, 05:38 AM
Does anyone know how the UK alcohol licencing laws apply to supermarkets? Specifically, if I want to do my shopping at 7.00am before I go to work, can I buy a bottle of wine? I think pubs can't serve alcohol before 11.00am except for the few that have a 24 hour licence, but I have no idea how that works for supermarkets.
I work in a 24hr supermarket, so: we can sell alcohol between 10AM to 10PM, but not between 10PM and 10AM. (Physically can't, in fact- the tills won't let you!) Opening times have no effect on when you can sell alcohol.

Quackers
Apr 05, 2012, 06:02 AM
My local 24 hour place stops selling alcohol at 11 PM, I have no idea when it starts selling it though.

LegionSteve
Apr 05, 2012, 07:47 AM
I work in a 24hr supermarket, so: we can sell alcohol between 10AM to 10PM, but not between 10PM and 10AM. (Physically can't, in fact- the tills won't let you!) Opening times have no effect on when you can sell alcohol.

No early morning shopping trips for me then. Thanks for the answer. :goodjob:

Traitorfish
Apr 05, 2012, 08:19 AM
My local 24 hour place stops selling alcohol at 11 PM, I have no idea when it starts selling it though.
Oops, I forgot that England is 11-11, it's just Scotland that is 10-10. Otherwise the same applies, though.

SS-18 ICBM
Apr 05, 2012, 12:16 PM
Are there any nations other than the US that have designated entire swaths of the globe as areas of responsibility for their armed forces?

Cutlass
Apr 05, 2012, 12:35 PM
Russia. The UK. France (more in the past than now). It's the "spheres of interest" theory.

Farm Boy
Apr 05, 2012, 01:46 PM
Any country in an alliance would qualify. All member states of NATO being one example.

SS-18 ICBM
Apr 05, 2012, 01:56 PM
What do they name their AORs? Maybe something more catchy than USCENTCOM?

Flying Pig
Apr 05, 2012, 03:57 PM
I'm not actually sure what our divisions are called - I think they're just geographical, so 'Northern Ireland', 'Europe' (I Corps, or what was I Corps anyway), the South Atlantic (basically the Falklands with a few associated bits), Horn of Africa, and so on. The Middle East itself was a term coined by the Army during the war; the Royal Navy insisted on treating the Mediterranian as one entity but our idea of splitting it gradually gained ground. Certainly the boss over in Ulster used to be called 'GOC NI'. That said we do have the rather nice abbreviation COMUKAMPHIBFOR for the head of the Royal Marines.

aimeeandbeatles
Apr 06, 2012, 08:04 PM
I just read that an advertisement was banned because the store was called Sofa King and the advertisement used "Sofa King Low." How is that offensive?

madviking
Apr 06, 2012, 08:10 PM
Say it slowly.

aimeeandbeatles
Apr 06, 2012, 08:40 PM
Say it slowly.

I really dont get it.

_random_
Apr 06, 2012, 08:41 PM
It sounds like "so [redacted] low."

aimeeandbeatles
Apr 06, 2012, 08:45 PM
Oh dear! Am I going to get an infraction :ack:

Civciv5
Apr 07, 2012, 01:27 AM
If you are elected pope,can you refuse to become pope?

shadowplay
Apr 07, 2012, 02:16 AM
If you are elected pope,can you refuse to become pope?

Yes, a cardinal can refuse. It's also kept secret who's been elected but has refused the papacy.

http://www.askacatholic.com/_webpostings/answers/2005_04APR/2005AprCanANomineeRefueseTheJob.cfm

salty mud
Apr 07, 2012, 12:05 PM
How close are doctors and scientists to discovering a cure for tinnitus?

Cutlass
Apr 07, 2012, 12:16 PM
How close are doctors and scientists to discovering a cure for tinnitus?


Not, last I heard. They can at large expense mask some of the symptoms. But not cure the causes.

salty mud
Apr 07, 2012, 01:01 PM
I know it is of particular relevance to you, Cutlass. Since I had an ear infection I've had a louder ear ringing than usual. I hope it's not set to get even worse.

Ceoladir
Apr 07, 2012, 10:18 PM
Russia. The UK. France (more in the past than now). It's the "spheres of interest" theory.
I'm not 100% sure about this, and I'm too lazy to check before posting this, but I think France is a lot more active overseas then you'd think based off the general American perception of them.

Joecoolyo
Apr 07, 2012, 11:03 PM
I'm not 100% sure about this, and I'm too lazy to check before posting this, but I think France is a lot more active overseas then you'd think based off the general American perception of them.

IIRC they do a majority of it in the former French West Africa.

taillesskangaru
Apr 08, 2012, 01:01 AM
The French sphere is basically all of Europe and half of Africa.

_random_
Apr 08, 2012, 03:23 AM
Is chemically pure blue crystal meth actually a thing?

mayor
Apr 08, 2012, 04:58 AM
The French sphere is basically all of Europe and half of Africa.

hmm, if we Dutch would belong to a sphere, it would be a German sphere

taillesskangaru
Apr 08, 2012, 05:06 AM
hmm, if we Dutch would belong to a sphere, it would be a German sphere

France and Germany have apparently reached some sort of accommodation to establish a codominium over the European Union; Germany looks after the money side, and France looks after relations with the external world.

Cutlass
Apr 08, 2012, 09:42 AM
I know it is of particular relevance to you, Cutlass. Since I had an ear infection I've had a louder ear ringing than usual. I hope it's not set to get even worse.


Well let's hope it's a temporary thing for you due to the infection then. Good luck.

Ceoladir
Apr 08, 2012, 04:24 PM
France and Germany have apparently reached some sort of accommodation to establish a codominium over the European Union; Germany looks after the money side, and France looks after relations with the external world.
The reason their relations have been improving is because France is trying to acquire the rest of the Rhineland and Germany Alsace-Lorraine. They've decided to do it diplomatically this time. :mischief:

Flying Pig
Apr 09, 2012, 06:42 AM
The French sphere is basically all of Europe and half of Africa.

The problem is that most of NATO's big players think that Europe is their sphere.

taillesskangaru
Apr 09, 2012, 06:46 AM
The problem is that most of NATO's big players think that Europe is their sphere.

Spheres overlap.

Then again, who are NATO's big players? The United States, with Britain and France as very distant seconds, and maybe Turkey, but then it's a bit of a pariah. That's it. Of these, France is probably in the best position in Europe.

Flying Pig
Apr 09, 2012, 07:17 AM
Spheres overlap.

Yes, but they create conflict - in this case more confusion than fighting - when they do.


Then again, who are NATO's big players? The United States, with Britain and France as very distant seconds, and maybe Turkey, but then it's a bit of a pariah. That's it. Of these, France is probably in the best position in Europe.

The US, for obvious reasons, France and Germany, and the UK - although we've turned away from our European defence policy since 1991.

Dachs
Apr 09, 2012, 11:56 AM
Germany? Not since the early nineties.

Flying Pig
Apr 09, 2012, 11:58 AM
Germany? Not since the early nineties.

I don't know, their actions over the Euro seem to indicate that they see the EU as their baby to some extent.

Dachs
Apr 09, 2012, 12:00 PM
I don't know, their actions over the Euro seem to indicate that they see the EU as their baby to some extent.
I think you're confusing EU monetary and fiscal policy with NATO military relevance.

Flying Pig
Apr 09, 2012, 12:11 PM
I think you're confusing EU monetary and fiscal policy with NATO military relevance.

Sorry - I'm not talking about their role within NATO (it was just an easy grouping to use), I'm talking about the areas that different countries consider 'their backyards'

Dachs
Apr 09, 2012, 12:12 PM
Sorry - I'm not talking about their role within NATO (it was just an easy grouping to use), I'm talking about the areas that different countries consider 'their backyards'
Then the issue evaporates. A French military half-hegemony is in no way incompatible with a German economic hegemony.

EDIT: Oh, hey, 26k.

Atticus
Apr 10, 2012, 03:55 PM
Are modern cartridge pistols superior to modern revolvers? Or vice versa? Or is one better in some respects and the other in other?

say1988
Apr 10, 2012, 04:02 PM
I can't say for sure, but from what I have seen in various places, revolvers tend to be more reliable as the mechanism is simpler. However this is probably less significant today than historically.
On the other hand semi-automatic pistols are quicker to reload and have higher ammunition. They are also easier to conceal due to the flat shape.

Cutlass
Apr 10, 2012, 04:04 PM
What is a "modern cartridge pistol"? It doesn't google. Do you mean automatic pistols? Those are better than revolvers in a number of respects. Larger ammo load, faster reload, faster rate of fire.

Atticus
Apr 10, 2012, 04:12 PM
Do you mean automatic pistols?

Yes, that's what I meant. :)

So are revolvers more a matter of taste and looks, or do they have some real advantage? If not the reliability which say1988 mentioned.

Cutlass
Apr 10, 2012, 04:57 PM
Well, the revolver is very simple, and so reliable. Some people like them for target shooting, because they do not have recoiling parts. Certain very powerful bullet types are made for revolvers, I'm not certain why. I'm not really a gin expert.

Farm Boy
Apr 10, 2012, 09:30 PM
A revolver will operate longer before parts break as it has less of them and they are individually simpler. They are less subject to jamming/malfunction and have simpler maintenance. Target shooting is a good use for them.

If you are looking for advantages between the two for their intended use, killing a human, a pistol with a clip will likely outperform a revolver in every aspect. It will hold more rounds, it will fire them more quickly, and it front loads much of the reloading time into filling replacement clips which is done prior to use rather than during use such as a revolver requires.

AL_DA_GREAT
Apr 11, 2012, 08:36 AM
Is there a way to calculate what percentage of the earth's surface you can see from a certain altitude? We are assuming the earth is a perfect sphere.

I figured out the distance to the horizon formula but I can't get the % of the surface.

(radius of earth)^2 + (distance to horizon)^2 = (distance to horizon + altitude)^2

No this is not a school assignment. I actually enjoy this type of stuff.

CKS
Apr 11, 2012, 09:01 AM
Roughly speaking, you are seeing a circle of radius (distance to horizon), so you can do (area of your circle)/(surface area of earth) to get the fraction you want. This works okay as long as you aren't too high up. Higher up is more complicated, but it can be done.

AL_DA_GREAT
Apr 11, 2012, 09:12 AM
Another question. As some of you know I bicycled Stockholm-barcelona-Rome-Stockholm last summer. This summer I am doing a few short trips but no long ones. However next spring I want to do north America. I am considering cycling from Orlando to los angeles with a start in march to june. How is the weather? How lonely will the roads by in Texas/new mexico/arizona?

How dangerous is southern USA? Are there any cities that are no go zones for a guy on an expensive bicycle?

Cutlass
Apr 11, 2012, 11:34 AM
The Southwest is relatively safe. But look into distances between stops. You could easily find yourself crossing 100 miles of desert without any water but what you brought with you.

madviking
Apr 11, 2012, 11:48 AM
Another question. As some of you know I bicycled Stockholm-barcelona-Rome-Stockholm last summer. This summer I am doing a few short trips but no long ones. However next spring I want to do north America. I am considering cycling from Orlando to los angeles with a start in march to june. How is the weather? How lonely will the roads by in Texas/new mexico/arizona?

How dangerous is southern USA? Are there any cities that are no go zones for a guy on an expensive bicycle?

Weather should be fine.

Safety wise, I think there's always that risk, being alone and such, but there's nothing out of the normal (mafiosos, etc.) to worry about.

Joecoolyo
Apr 11, 2012, 02:23 PM
Another question. As some of you know I bicycled Stockholm-barcelona-Rome-Stockholm last summer. This summer I am doing a few short trips but no long ones. However next spring I want to do north America. I am considering cycling from Orlando to los angeles with a start in march to june. How is the weather? How lonely will the roads by in Texas/new mexico/arizona?

How dangerous is southern USA? Are there any cities that are no go zones for a guy on an expensive bicycle?

Yeah, as the other two said, the thing you'll probably have to worry about the most is the desert in the Southwest.

_random_
Apr 11, 2012, 05:04 PM
Another question. As some of you know I bicycled Stockholm-barcelona-Rome-Stockholm last summer. This summer I am doing a few short trips but no long ones. However next spring I want to do north America. I am considering cycling from Orlando to los angeles with a start in march to june. How is the weather? How lonely will the roads by in Texas/new mexico/arizona?

How dangerous is southern USA? Are there any cities that are no go zones for a guy on an expensive bicycle?

I'd suggest watching out for meth fiends and drug cartels, but pretty much everything I know about the Southwest I learned from Breaking Bad.

Hey, speaking of Breaking Bad, is chemically pure blue crystal meth actually a thing?

Skwink
Apr 11, 2012, 05:55 PM
If the Earth suddenly stopped spinning, would I fall over?

This was a joke on Reddit, but I'm actually curious.

Cutlass
Apr 11, 2012, 05:59 PM
No. Gravity would remain the same. I'm unsure of the math, but potentially you would actually get "heavier" because the centrifugal force of the planet's spin is trying to throw you off into space. Just not very strongly. So you remove the spin, you remove a force that is pushing you away from the planet. Not the one that attracts you towards the planet.

MagisterCultuum
Apr 11, 2012, 06:01 PM
You would continue to be held down by gravity, but would also continue moving in the direction you were moving rather the ground below you moved or not. There would be considerable displacement across the surface of the Earth, at least until you hit something big enough to stop you. How fast you would move relative a non-revolving Earth depends on your latitude. If you were at the equator you would be moving at over 1000 miles per hour, but in Cascadia you would move closer to 570 miles per hour.

SS-18 ICBM
Apr 11, 2012, 06:01 PM
But everything else also stops moving in that direction. It'd be more enlightening to analyze what caused the Earth to stop spinning.

Anyway, is a nation flattening its own embassy in another country after evacuating it a provocative action? Or does bombing your own territorial exclave in this context have no international diplomatic implications?

Cutlass
Apr 11, 2012, 06:03 PM
Anyway, is a nation flattening its own embassy in another country after evacuating it a provocative action? Or does bombing your own territorial exclave in this context have no international diplomatic implications?

I think that would be very situational. But generally the buildings are abandoned, not destroyed.

say1988
Apr 11, 2012, 07:20 PM
If the Earth suddenly stopped spinning, would I fall over?

This was a joke on Reddit, but I'm actually curious.

Along with everything else, you would retain your momentum. So you would go flying to the East. Think of wehn a car slams on its breaks, but going up to 1670 km/h (at the equator). Even at the Arctic Circle it is going 660 km/hour. If you were very close to the North or South Poles you might be able to keep your balance since your momentum would be so much lower.

Verarde
Apr 11, 2012, 08:04 PM
Can you change a license plate's letters and numbers to something else legally?

Cutlass
Apr 11, 2012, 08:06 PM
Can you change a license plate's letters and numbers to something else legally?


No. :p Not if you intend to use it on the road.

Verarde
Apr 11, 2012, 08:15 PM
I mean something like go to the DMV and say, I want to change my car's license plates. Can you do that?

Skwink
Apr 11, 2012, 08:22 PM
I mean something like go to the DMV and say, I want to change my car's license plates. Can you do that?

You mean like a word or something? Sure, people do it all the time.

MagisterCultuum
Apr 11, 2012, 08:22 PM
You can pay extra to get a vanity plate, where you are allowed to choose what letters and numbers to use within certain limits. (You cannot choose something someone has already taken, and various obscenities and racial slurs are banned too.)

I'm not sure about just requesting a new plate with random letters and numbers.

cardgame
Apr 11, 2012, 08:44 PM
14CV88 is also frowned upon.

madviking
Apr 11, 2012, 10:30 PM
and ILVTOFU

cardgame
Apr 11, 2012, 10:39 PM
I love tofu is banned?

Why?

PlutonianEmpire
Apr 11, 2012, 10:43 PM
I love tofu is banned?

Why?
Hint: Add two more spaces. ;)

madviking
Apr 11, 2012, 10:45 PM
I love tofu is banned?

Why?

i love to f u

cardgame
Apr 11, 2012, 11:02 PM
Less cursing, more tofu.

azzaman333
Apr 12, 2012, 03:21 AM
I love tofu is banned?

Why?

No one likes tofu.

mayor
Apr 12, 2012, 04:30 AM
If produced properly it can be quite tasty actually

AL_DA_GREAT
Apr 12, 2012, 05:47 AM
I just realised that my name is spelled differently on my Canadian and on my Swedish passport. I looked over my my papers and it seems like I have a different name in each country. Is this an issue?

Cutlass
Apr 12, 2012, 07:00 AM
I mean something like go to the DMV and say, I want to change my car's license plates. Can you do that?


You have to apply for a vanity plate. And they won't give you just anything that you might want. each state has its own rules on the subject.

SS-18 ICBM
Apr 12, 2012, 07:02 AM
I think that would be very situational.

What would be the potential factors to determine it then?

Cutlass
Apr 12, 2012, 07:09 AM
What would be the potential factors to determine it then?


I would think the hostility would have to be extremely high, at least in the short run, and no real prospect of repairing the situation. Plus there would probably have to be something left in the building that you really didn't want the other side to get their hands on. It's pointless to destroy the building, but the contents might be valuable.

SS-18 ICBM
Apr 12, 2012, 08:35 AM
Okay. The situation is an attack by militant and regular army forces. The documents are your typical diplomatic and espionage cables.

Cutlass
Apr 12, 2012, 11:23 AM
Well you always burn any documents that you can't take with you. But that's rarely going to require blowing the building up. :p I would expect any embassy building to be equipped with an incinerator.

SS-18 ICBM
Apr 12, 2012, 11:26 AM
Well what if the evacuation has to be done post haste?

Cutlass
Apr 12, 2012, 12:00 PM
Then you set a bonfire :p



Question: Why use brass instead of steel for shell and bullet casings?

Farm Boy
Apr 12, 2012, 12:03 PM
My guess would be that brass is softer than steel but hard enough to do the job. If you make the casing "as hard as" the barrel of the gun which fires it(steel), the casings will damage the firearm during use. You clean gun barrels with brass/copper brushes for this reason.

Edit: further thought - I think brass will store better than a steel casing. I'm also not sure if a steel casing could be reloaded.

Flying Pig
Apr 12, 2012, 12:13 PM
Question: Why use brass instead of steel for shell and bullet casings?

Surprisingly, simple cost

say1988
Apr 12, 2012, 12:32 PM
Except from my understanding steel cased ammunition is actually cheaper, but the cases cannot be reused.

Farm Boy
Apr 12, 2012, 12:55 PM
Surprisingly, simple cost

I done be skooled. I think the storage concerns would remain pretty valid though.

Cutlass
Apr 12, 2012, 04:43 PM
Surprisingly, simple cost

I don't think you've got it. :nope:


Except from my understanding steel cased ammunition is actually cheaper, but the cases cannot be reused.


From FP's link, brass costs as much as 2 1/2 times what steel costs. But for some uses, the ease of machining and the price regained from recycling offset the difference. However with shell casings the machining costs isn't going to be high, because it's mass stamped. And the recycling doesn't hold, because an awful lot of it is military ammo, and that brass will not be recycled, because it is lost in use.

Farm Boy
Apr 12, 2012, 06:49 PM
If we assume both of the above points are true you are still left with the fact that brass will store better(less corrosion) and it will be easier on the firearm itself during use.

Flying Pig
Apr 13, 2012, 04:36 AM
From FP's link, brass costs as much as 2 1/2 times what steel costs. But for some uses, the ease of machining and the price regained from recycling offset the difference. However with shell casings the machining costs isn't going to be high, because it's mass stamped. And the recycling doesn't hold, because an awful lot of it is military ammo, and that brass will not be recycled, because it is lost in use.

Actually the vast majority of the brass fired in training (and in some cases in combat) is recycled - to the tune of pretty much every single round.

Cutlass
Apr 13, 2012, 07:22 AM
Actually the vast majority of the brass fired in training (and in some cases in combat) is recycled - to the tune of pretty much every single round.


Yes, but that's just training. Which, in peacetime may be the largest number of rounds, including civilian. But once in a war zone, what gets policed up? Not very much I'd wager. At fixed bases and aboard ship it's just in the way. On the battlefield it's scattered and the soldiers aren't sticking around to collect it. I've heard that in WWII, even the US had to really struggle to keep up with the brass demand. And, you know, steel in many ways recycles even easier than brass, because you can use a magnet to pick it up in mass. So I'm thinking there has to be another answer. Perhaps Farm Boy is right in that it's a corrosion issue. A small bit of corrosion where the casing meets the round could ruin your whole day.

Flying Pig
Apr 13, 2012, 08:06 AM
Yes, but that's just training. Which, in peacetime may be the largest number of rounds, including civilian. But once in a war zone, what gets policed up? Not very much I'd wager. At fixed bases and aboard ship it's just in the way. On the battlefield it's scattered and the soldiers aren't sticking around to collect it. I've heard that in WWII, even the US had to really struggle to keep up with the brass demand. And, you know, steel in many ways recycles even easier than brass, because you can use a magnet to pick it up in mass. So I'm thinking there has to be another answer. Perhaps Farm Boy is right in that it's a corrosion issue. A small bit of corrosion where the casing meets the round could ruin your whole day.

Wouldn't steel also be heavier? The thing is you need to realise what the proportions are - even nowadays we're still firing at least as many rounds at home, in Germany, in Kenya and in Canada as we are in Afghanistan, and even in Afghanistan a lot of brass is picked up - particularly when fighting on 'home turf' out of PBs and the like.

Chukchi Husky
Apr 13, 2012, 08:57 AM
Why is Shakespeare the most remembered of all the playwrights?

say1988
Apr 13, 2012, 08:57 AM
Wouldn't steel also be heavier?

A quick Google (http://www.avlandesign.com/density_metal.htm) shows Brass has a density of abot 8500-8750 kg/cubic metre, while steel is about 7500-8000. Of course both vary depending on the specific alloys used. but unless the steel requires thicker casings or the casings, then it should be lighter. Probably negligable on a per round basis, but if you are carrying a couple hundred rounds it would add up.

An easy test would be to go to a store and pick up a box of each and see what weighs more.

Farm Boy
Apr 13, 2012, 09:30 AM
A quick [URL="http://www.avlandesign.com/density_metal.htm"]An easy test would be to go to a store and pick up a box of each and see what weighs more.

Not that easy for some folks outside the US. Not always that easy to find a box of shells with steel casings. I can't recall if I have seen steel-cased shells stocked as a matter of course. You might have to order them in.

Dreadnought
Apr 13, 2012, 09:44 AM
Got into a debate about an economic phrase, whether it is Say's Law or not:

"More exports help the economy grow because they typically boost factory production, which can fuel more hiring and lead to greater consumer spending."

So, is the idea that "exports ---> boost factory production ---> fuel more hiring & greater consumer spending" an example of Say's Law?

Flying Pig
Apr 13, 2012, 09:58 AM
Yes, in a way - Say's law implies that rational people don't hoard money, which is required to make the jump from point 2 to point 3.

Cutlass
Apr 13, 2012, 10:58 AM
Wouldn't steel also be heavier? The thing is you need to realise what the proportions are - even nowadays we're still firing at least as many rounds at home, in Germany, in Kenya and in Canada as we are in Afghanistan, and even in Afghanistan a lot of brass is picked up - particularly when fighting on 'home turf' out of PBs and the like.


But brass was standardized for casing use long before those levels of training became common. How much ammo did the US Army use in training before WWII? A better question would be What Army? So I can't imagine the recycling was much of an issue before WWII in the minds of military planners or ammo manufacturers. :dunno:

Flying Pig
Apr 13, 2012, 11:03 AM
That's actually been going through my head thinking about this one. The things is that brass has always been the material of choice and I don't think anyone's ever seriously considered using anything else. I consulted Wikipedia and found the following:

Brass is a commonly used case material. It is resistant to corrosion, the case head can be drawn and work hardened to make useful cases for modern metallic cartridges working at relatively high pressure, and the neck and body portion are easily annealed to make the case ductile enough to allow reforming so that it can be reloaded many times.

Some "plinking" ammunition, as well as some military ammunition (mainly from the former Soviet Union and China) is made with steel cases because steel is less expensive than brass. It is not feasible to reuse steel cases and these rapidly deteriorate in the environment, through rusting. As military forces typically consider small arms cartridge cases to be a disposable, one-time-use, devices these limitations are inconsequential for those applications. However, case weight (mass) affects how much ammunition a soldier can carry, so the lighter steel cases do have a military advantage; conversely, steel is more susceptible to contamination and damage so all such cases are varnished or otherwise sealed against the elements but that seal is relatively fragile and such ammunition must be handled more carefully from the time of manufacture until use.

One downside caused by the increased strength of steel in the neck of these cases (compared to the annealed neck of a brass case) is that propellant gas can blow back past the neck and into the chamber. Constituents of these gases condense on the (relatively cold) chamber wall. This solid propellant residue can make extraction of fired cases difficult. This is less of a problem for guns of the former Warsaw Pact nations, which were designed with much larger chamber tolerances than NATO guns are.

Cutlass
Apr 13, 2012, 11:08 AM
Got into a debate about an economic phrase, whether it is Say's Law or not:

"More exports help the economy grow because they typically boost factory production, which can fuel more hiring and lead to greater consumer spending."

So, is the idea that "exports ---> boost factory production ---> fuel more hiring & greater consumer spending" an example of Say's Law?



To go as simple as possible, Say's Law says that "supply creates its own demand". To expand a bit, the act of supplying goods and services generates economic activity and cash flows which result in the ability to purchase all that is produced.

So I would not cite your example as an example of Say's Law.

Cutlass
Apr 13, 2012, 11:18 AM
That's actually been going through my head thinking about this one. The things is that brass has always been the material of choice and I don't think anyone's ever seriously considered using anything else. I consulted Wikipedia and found the following:



So we can summarize 1) corrosion resistance, as Farm Boy was saying, 2) less wear to the gun, 3) less gas getting past the cartridge because the softer brass deforms to restrict that, 4) cleaner gun less likely to get jammed up, 5) has characteristics that make it more rugged for handling in the field.

I guess that answers my question well enough. :goodjob:

timtofly
Apr 13, 2012, 11:19 AM
Why is Shakespeare the most remembered of all the playwrights?

Evolution? Survival of the most accepted?

NickyJ
Apr 13, 2012, 02:43 PM
Why is Shakespeare the most remembered of all the playwrights?
Evolution? Survival of the most accepted?
I'd have to say that probably is it. I read some of his plays, and the following quote best describes my thoughs:
It’s a bunch of English fruits in tights running around going, "blah-blah, blah-blah, blah-blah." Give me a break.

Ceoladir
Apr 13, 2012, 03:10 PM
I'd have to say that probably is it. I read some of his plays, and the following quote best describes my thoughs:
Culture isn't your thing.

Flying Pig
Apr 13, 2012, 03:19 PM
I'd have to say that probably is it. I read some of his plays, and the following quote best describes my thoughs:

Go and see them performed. Macbeth happens to be my favorite play, ever, but you wouldn't get that just from reading it. Several of them have been updated into modern settings (Baz Luhrmann did this with Romeo and Juliet, as have many others with plays such as King Lear), and some have been overhauled altogether (the BBC did Macbeth set in a Scottish kitchen, with the Wyrd Sisters replaced by a hilarious trio of bin-men).

NickyJ
Apr 13, 2012, 03:39 PM
Culture isn't your thing.
If those books are considered culture, then I strongly agree with you. :goodjob:

Go and see them performed. Macbeth happens to be my favorite play, ever, but you wouldn't get that just from reading it. Several of them have been updated into modern settings (Baz Luhrmann did this with Romeo and Juliet, as have many others with plays such as King Lear), and some have been overhauled altogether (the BBC did Macbeth set in a Scottish kitchen, with the Wyrd Sisters replaced by a hilarious trio of bin-men).
I suppose they are better when acted. I did see Macbeth and Hamlet shown on PBS, but they were butchered through modernization. (I'm sorry, but Hamlet speaking to Yorick's skull with a backhoe in the background is painful to watch.)

rugbyLEAGUEfan
Apr 13, 2012, 03:44 PM
Why is Shakespeare the most remembered of all the playwrights?

I would say his greatest talent was that his best works are defined by their insights into the workings of the human mind . They are like brilliant psychology manuals .

500 odd years later , humans pretty much think the same way so his work stands the test of time .

I feel the same way about Tolstoy . "Wow , that's so true , people do think and act that way" is often my reaction to their stuff

Bugfatty300
Apr 13, 2012, 04:18 PM
That's actually been going through my head thinking about this one. The things is that brass has always been the material of choice and I don't think anyone's ever seriously considered using anything else. I consulted Wikipedia and found the following:

Actually the Soviet Bloc used steel cases and most of them still do. The vast majority of 7.62x39, 7.62x54 and 5.45x39 cartridges use steel cases. Even here in the USA, Russian steel case ammo is extremely popular.

In fact most of the center fire ammo I shoot is Russian Wolf steel cased ammo. Since I don't reload or shoot competitively, I see no reason shell out double the money for brass ammunition. Cost is definitely the biggest advantage to steel cases.

So we can summarize 1) corrosion resistance, as Farm Boy was saying, 2) less wear to the gun, 3) less gas getting past the cartridge because the softer brass deforms to restrict that, 4) cleaner gun less likely to get jammed up, 5) has characteristics that make it more rugged for handling in the field.

Lets trim that down a little.

1) True.

2) This is a myth among gun owners. Steel cases will not harm or cause anymore wear and tear to most modern guns than brass cases will. As I said before, steel cases are very popular for civilian shooters in the US because of their lower cost. If they were damaging the guns then they would not sell.

The only gun I own that doesn't like steel cases is my Mosin-Nagant which sometimes gets a sticky bolt. But the gun isn't being damaged or worn out. It's really just an annoyance.

3) True.

4) The casing does not determine how dirty the cartridge burns when fired. That is a combination of powder and primer.

5) Can't really say.

Joecoolyo
Apr 13, 2012, 04:23 PM
Culture isn't your thing.

Well no everything he made was great. I for one didn't care for Romeo and Juliet.

Although I really enjoyed Macbeth and Hamlet.

_random_
Apr 13, 2012, 04:32 PM
Well no everything he made was great. I for one didn't care for Romeo and Juliet.

Although I really enjoyed Macbeth and Hamlet.

I've acted in one of his crappier plays, so I'm certainly not going to praise him without restraint, but dismissing his entire body of work does seem like the mark of an uncultured individual.

PlutonianEmpire
Apr 13, 2012, 06:15 PM
Will we regress into the stone age within our lifetimes?

(I'm posting it here cuz I've no clue how to make it a proper OP significant enough to generate dozens upon dozens of pages of discussion.)

Cutlass
Apr 13, 2012, 06:23 PM
Will we regress into the stone age within our lifetimes?

(I'm posting it here cuz I've no clue how to make it a proper OP significant enough to generate dozens upon dozens of pages of discussion.)


No :p

timtofly
Apr 13, 2012, 07:25 PM
Will we regress into the stone age within our lifetimes?

(I'm posting it here cuz I've no clue how to make it a proper OP significant enough to generate dozens upon dozens of pages of discussion.)

No, they were way smarter.

Joecoolyo
Apr 13, 2012, 08:07 PM
I've acted in one of his crappier plays, so I'm certainly not going to praise him without restraint, but dismissing his entire body of work does seem like the mark of an uncultured individual.

Yeah, true.

Skwink
Apr 13, 2012, 10:01 PM
Will we regress into the stone age within our lifetimes?

(I'm posting it here cuz I've no clue how to make it a proper OP significant enough to generate dozens upon dozens of pages of discussion.)

We could try.

PlutonianEmpire
Apr 13, 2012, 10:35 PM
No, they were way smarter.
Well, what WILL we regress into?

Seeing all the arguments made on this forum, I KNOW we're gonna regress at some point within our lives. Resource depletion, minimum size of transistors, environment degradation, space travel limitations, political BS, etc. Need I go on? :(

timtofly
Apr 13, 2012, 11:54 PM
Well, what WILL we regress into?

Seeing all the arguments made on this forum, I KNOW we're gonna regress at some point within our lives. Resource depletion, minimum size of transistors, environment degradation, space travel limitations, political BS, etc. Need I go on? :(

Like I always tell my wife. I will answer you when it happens. Since my theory is that we have been regressing since the first man, we can only regress foward. If anything we may became the animals that we have "dreamed" we came from.

Since you added technology, I do not see any regressing in that area. I do not think that we can reach that point period. It is funny that we are regressing while our technology keeps advancing, but even the brightest scientist have pointed that out. At least the one's that think we are devolving and not evolving.

The past may not have had the tools that we have, but they did far more than we do in a lot of areas. While the base of knowledge is widening, and things are becoming more specialised, the bulk of knowledge has been there for a long time. It only was developed as it was needed, or applied.

Chukchi Husky
Apr 14, 2012, 06:46 AM
I would say his greatest talent was that his best works are defined by their insights into the workings of the human mind . They are like brilliant psychology manuals .

500 odd years later , humans pretty much think the same way so his work stands the test of time .

I feel the same way about Tolstoy . "Wow , that's so true , people do think and act that way" is often my reaction to their stuff

But why is it only Shakespeare is remembered, while all the other playwrights are forgotten?

Arakhor
Apr 14, 2012, 07:02 AM
Who says they're forgotten? Kit Marlowe and Edmund Mallory may not be well known to the general masses, but they're hardly forgotten.

Flying Pig
Apr 14, 2012, 07:32 AM
Actually the Soviet Bloc used steel cases and most of them still do. The vast majority of 7.62x39, 7.62x54 and 5.45x39 cartridges use steel cases. Even here in the USA, Russian steel case ammo is extremely popular.


Aye, found that on the Wiki article; I stand corrected.

Well no everything he made was great. I for one didn't care for Romeo and Juliet.

Although I really enjoyed Macbeth and Hamlet.

I didn't much care for Romeo and Juliet, but quite liked Romeo and Juliet once I decided that seeing them as mature, sensible human beings was missing the point - they're supposed to be teenagers and they're supposed to act like idiots!

Leoreth
Apr 14, 2012, 09:09 AM
Well, what WILL we regress into?

Seeing all the arguments made on this forum, I KNOW we're gonna regress at some point within our lives. Resource depletion, minimum size of transistors, environment degradation, space travel limitations, political BS, etc. Need I go on? :(
Huh? :huh:

Joecoolyo
Apr 14, 2012, 11:18 AM
I didn't much care for Romeo and Juliet, but quite liked Romeo and Juliet once I decided that seeing them as mature, sensible human beings was missing the point - they're supposed to be teenagers and they're supposed to act like idiots!

It wasn't so much that that the story felt really rushed, and (not it's fault) cliched.

I'm thinking that it's one of those plays you need to see actually acted out, rather than read in the book, which is what I did.

PlutonianEmpire
Apr 14, 2012, 04:08 PM
Huh? :huh:
Come on, man, you know damn well what I'm talking about. We've both seen the discussions on this very forum about the extreme difficulties of deep space travel, mining, and colonization.

And minimum size of transistors part, I know there's theories about how how small computer microchips and processors and stuff can't get any smaller after a certain point. I forget the details.

aronnax
Apr 14, 2012, 09:29 PM
I need a word to describe the relationship between Britain and some of her former colonies.

If Britain and Canada, Australia and New Zealand are now 'peers', what word or words best describes Britain and India, Pakistan, Malaysia, Kenya.

Colonies that gain independence amicably with Britain but had it's fair share of bitter anti-colonial feeling.

Dachs
Apr 14, 2012, 09:31 PM
If Britain and Canada, Australia and New Zealand are now 'peers', what word or words best describes Britain and India, Pakistan, Malaysia, Kenya.

Colonies that gain independence amicably with Britain but had it's fair share of bitter anti-colonial feeling.
Frenemies.

Though there was nothing amicable about the ways Malaysia and Kenya got their independence.

Borachio
Apr 14, 2012, 09:49 PM
Well no everything he made was great. I for one didn't care for Romeo and Juliet.

Although I really enjoyed Macbeth and Hamlet.
Yay! Wicked piece of Music by Prokovief for RJ.
Macbeth scary.
Hamlet hard.

aronnax
Apr 14, 2012, 10:01 PM
Frenemies.

Though there was nothing amicable about the ways Malaysia and Kenya got their independence.

More amicable than Egypt, Rhodesia and Ireland.

While frenemy would be a good good descriptor, I need something more formal to use in an essay.