View Full Version : New Civ: The Scots of Alba


Pangur Bán
Jul 29, 2003, 07:16 PM
DOn't expect too much, this is just a replaced civ :D...but...fancy playing a game as the Scots? Or, to be more accurate in modern terms, the Gaels of Alba?

The original term "Scot" meant "Gael" and the Gaels almost certainly came from Ireland. These people established colonies in western Caledonia, and a territory grew up there first called "Dál Riata", then, after the takeover of "Pictland", called "Alba." Alba originally meant Britain, but came, by the end of the 9th century to refer to the area of northern Britain ruled by the Gaels. The Gaels ruled Scotland (Alba) until the death of Alexander III in 1286. After that, the kingdom is still predominantly Gaelic in makeup, but the culture of the kingdom becomes Anglo-"Frankish".

This is a small mod, quite simple in purpose: to allow you to play as the Gaels of Alba without going through the tedious work of "adding" them yourself. Those who know me on these boards, know my love of Celtic Scotland, so perhaps not many of you will use this mod. :)
Anyhoo, Alba replaces the Celts. It has not been added because of the problems downloading the leaderheads. I don't imagine this will cause too many problems, as the Gaels were Celts, and so a game with both might be a bit silly :).

The UU is the "Highlander" (not very original I know), which replaces Medieval Infantry, and has the same powers as the latter, but treats all terrain as roads and upgrades to Rifleman instead of Guerrilla and costs one shield more. The unit requires Feudalism. Credit to Kindred 72 for the UU. I am not particularly happy with this name though, because the "Highlander" is more famous for his fire and charge tactics that require the use of gunpowder. But it'll do for now until I think of a better name! ;) Actually, I'd like to hear suggestions? :goodjob:

Please note that the city and leader lists for the other civs are more extensive than in the civ3x. There is an accompanying civilopedia entry.

There is also a world map version, a slightly altered version of the Kal-El WM. So, credit to him too. For this, the Iroquois have been changed to "Native America" and the Ottomans to "Turks." This makes sense for the world map. ;)

I did the city lists and the Civilopedia entry. These, especially the city list, took quite a bit of research. :eek: All the city names have the orthographic form they had in the middle ages, and most of them take their first ever recorded form. I researched these all to make it more realistic. Thank goodness for my Uni library. The civilopedia entry was a bit rushed though, but should do for the moment.

This mod is for PTW only

Enjoy :goodjob:

Click Here to Download the Mod - 1 MB (http://www.civfanatics.net/uploads5/Alba_Mod_v02.zip)

Pangur Bán
Jul 29, 2003, 07:19 PM
Here is the readme, which contains all the info about the new civ and installation explanation:

KingArthur
Jul 30, 2003, 05:34 AM
:goodjob:

I'll definitely take a look.

I see Ruthirglen in the city lists - is that modern day Rutherglen? That's my home town :)


Originally posted by calgacus
Here is the readme, which contains all the info about the new civ and installation explanation:

KingArthur
Jul 30, 2003, 12:57 PM
Originally posted by calgacus
Credit to Kindred 72 for the UU. I am not particularly happy with this name though, because the "Highlander" is more famous for his fire and charge tactics that require the use of gunpowder. But it'll do for now until I think of a better name! ;) Actually, I'd like to hear suggestions?

Well you could call him a clansman which is a rather generic term. Alternatively, Claymoreman or Claymore Warrior since that is what he seems to be wielding. I think the term highlander is fine though. I'd really like to see a unit that carries out a highland charge -it could work with a move of 2 and blitz characterstic.

Pangur Bán
Jul 30, 2003, 04:25 PM
Originally posted by KingArthur


Well you could call him a clansman which is a rather generic term. Alternatively, Claymoreman or Claymore Warrior since that is what he seems to be wielding. I think the term highlander is fine though. I'd really like to see a unit that carries out a highland charge -it could work with a move of 2 and blitz characterstic.

Yeah, such a unit would be brilliant :eek:

Since there wan't a great deal of non-geographical military specialization before the coming of the Normans, Highlander might have to do, even though the Highlands as a whole was not regarded as a regonizable region in the period. The divisions, in military terms, are usually "Scot, Pict, Galwegian, Briton and Norman" :) So, perhaps it could be called "Scottish Swordsman" or "Gaelic Swordsman" (it isn't often understood that in this period the Scots were Gaels by definition).

KingArthur
Aug 01, 2003, 04:51 AM
Calgacus
Jusy a couple of things I noted
- there are no resources on the version with the world map.
- the pedia entry for Scots has a link to the Highlander Unique Unit but it jumps you to the Gallic Swordsman entry.
- the actual Highlander entry doesn't have a description.

Pangur Bán
Aug 01, 2003, 07:28 AM
Originally posted by KingArthur

- the pedia entry for Scots has a link to the Highlander Unique Unit but it jumps you to the Gallic Swordsman entry.



I knew that, it was me that did that. ;)

Originally posted by KingArthur
- the actual Highlander entry doesn't have a description.

Knew that too! :)

I started a game on the world map. Finished off the English in the first 15 turns, but I'm isolated and thus technologically backward. So, I've placed some goody huts next to the Scottish starting location as well.

Originally posted by KingArthur
Calgacus
Jusy a couple of things I noted
- there are no resources on the version with the world map.


Didn't notice that. Shame on me :cringe:

Thanks for the feedback, KA! It's appreciated! :goodjob:

I have acted on it. ;)

Update to version 2.!

Changes:

1) Civilopedia entry for "Highlander added"
2) Resources generated for worldmap.

Pangur Bán
Aug 01, 2003, 07:56 AM
BTW, do people think the UU is underpowered? Should I increase the Highlanders stats?

At the mo., it replaces Medieval Infantry, but has the same cost and power, with the one advantage of "treat all terrain as roads". Is that underpoweredness? ;) Or about right? :confused:

KingArthur
Aug 04, 2003, 09:03 AM
Originally posted by calgacus
BTW, do people think the UU is underpowered? Should I increase the Highlanders stats?

At the mo., it replaces Medieval Infantry, but has the same cost and power, with the one advantage of "treat all terrain as roads". Is that underpoweredness? ;) Or about right? :confused:
I'd make 'em slightly cheaper. If you look at the Med Inf he's pretty much kitted out in expensive body armour. Alternatively minus 1Defence and +1 Attack relative to Med Inf.

Pangur Bán
Aug 04, 2003, 09:15 AM
Yeah, KA, I agree. I was thinking about doing that yesterday. It would also reflect the greater militarization of the Gaelic social system. They could recruit cheaply.

However, there is the danger of overpowering. I mean, would you be happy playing against a Scottish civ with that UU? ;)

sween32
Aug 04, 2003, 10:51 AM
are you using my Robert the Bruce from the PtW cd?

Pangur Bán
Aug 04, 2003, 10:55 AM
Nope, sween. It just replaces the Celts. But that's an idea I played with. The only problem is that I wasn't sure if everyone would have kept those files - maybe some peple like to save disk space, or maybe they've upgraded. Myself - I've got the new versions of most the mods that came with PTW. Too much uncertainty!

The other option: Your file is 20 megs or something, so I don't think it'd be worth forcing people to download that amount of MB just to play this small mod. Besides, the leader is Malcolm II - your leaderhead looks like Robert the Bruce! ;)

I don't suppose many will play more than one or two games with this mod - so the Celts won't be sorely missed. I think that replacing them was the best decision.

sween32
Aug 04, 2003, 12:21 PM
ah, ok. what are the stats for the UU?

Pangur Bán
Aug 04, 2003, 01:04 PM
same as medieval infantry, 1 shield more expensive, but treats all terrain as roads. That's
Cost 5
Moves 1 (as road)
Attack 4
Defense 2

Tathlum
Aug 28, 2003, 06:37 AM
Good work.
Rename them Gaels. The Scots Definately came from Ireland not "almost certainly". Irish and Scots are both Gaels (Goidelic Celts), Welsh are Brythonic Celts.
I'd give the UU Att4. Def2, Mov2, ignore move cost of hills and mountains, and possibly woods.

Pangur Bán
Aug 28, 2003, 07:00 AM
Originally posted by Tathlum
Good work.
Rename them Gaels. The Scots Definately came from Ireland not "almost certainly". Irish and Scots are both Gaels (Goidelic Celts), Welsh are Brythonic Celts.
I'd give the UU Att4. Def2, Mov2, ignore move cost of hills and mountains, and possibly woods.

Thanks :goodjob:

Well, the Scotii are first mentioned as attacking from Scotland. And contrary to traditional history, the archaeology of Argyleshire (Dalriada) shows no break with the past - which has led some to speculate that the Gaels were a interchannel sea people, and not a specifically Irish people. This is merely speculation, but do you now see why "almost certainly" is preferable to "definitely".

I may release a patch for this mod, BTW, to alter slightly the UU stats and to correct a tiny bug in the one of the scenarios where I forgot to cancel the Gallic Warrior.

Yoda Power
Aug 28, 2003, 07:28 AM
Cal why dont you make a version that does´nt replace any other civilization?

Pangur Bán
Aug 28, 2003, 07:32 AM
Originally posted by Yoda Power
Cal why dont you make a version that doesn't replace any other civilization?

Simple: Leaderheads and popularity! Only a few will ever play the mod. Thus there'd be no point uploading megs and megs when the Celts already do the job. :)

Yoda Power
Aug 28, 2003, 07:33 AM
Originally posted by calgacus


Simple: Leaderheads and popularity! Only a few will ever play the mod. Thus there'd be no point uploading megs and megs when the Celts already do the job. :) One leaderhead and one unit does´nt take very long to download.

Pangur Bán
Aug 28, 2003, 07:37 AM
It does for me now, as I am on 58K until I go away to the US in September. :( What leaderhead would you use BTW Yoda?

Yoda Power
Aug 28, 2003, 07:39 AM
Originally posted by calgacus
It does for me now, as I am on 58K until I go away to the US in September. :( What leaderhead would you use BTW Yoda? Robert the Bruce ofcause. I know the leader in your mod is not him, but he looks Scottish(which he is).

Pangur Bán
Aug 28, 2003, 07:54 AM
Well, that's a big file and, like I said to Sween before, it looks like Robert the Bruce - not Malcolm II! ;)

Yoda Power
Aug 28, 2003, 08:23 AM
Originally posted by calgacus
Well, that's a big file and, like I said to Sween before, it looks like Robert the Bruce - not Malcolm II! ;) Then use one of Gales leaderheads.

Pangur Bán
Aug 28, 2003, 08:33 AM
Yeah, maybe...but I don't think there's any necessity! ;)

Yoda Power
Aug 28, 2003, 08:35 AM
Originally posted by calgacus
Yeah, maybe...but I don't think there's any necessity! ;) well its up to you:)

Pangur Bán
Aug 28, 2003, 08:41 AM
Originally posted by calgacus
Yeah, maybe...but I don't think there's any necessity! ;)

Yeah, I know :cool: ;)

Tathlum
Aug 28, 2003, 09:13 AM
Erm Scotland wasnt always where it is now. The Scots came from Scotland alright but Scotland (the land of the scots) started in Ulaidh (Ulster). There are no cultures in Europe that are not at least partialy mixed but the early Scots were invaders from the Ulster side of what was later Dalriodha\Dal Riodha\Dal Riota. After the Vikings cut the shipping lanes between the Ulster and Scotland parts of Dal Riodha the Ulster portion was conquered by the other kingdoms in Ireland., and the Dal Riodhans on the Scottish side integrated with Picts, Northumbrians, Normans and became the Medieval Kingdom of Scotland. Not everyone in Scotland is descended from Irish invaders\settlers but the Scots are. Both are Gaelic. We share names, language, ledgends and culture.
Welsh are also Celtic but they are not Gaelic. They speak a different Language for a start. They are another Celtic people but they are not Gaelic. Scots are. The original Celts who inhabited what is now Scotland were British Celts like the Welsh. The Scots were Gaelic invaders from Ulster. They were the most successful of the invaders. there were others. Such as the Desi who invaded part of Wales. Even when they lived in Wales they were still Gaelic, spoke Gaelic built Cranogs ( a gaelic type of building but not a British one).
There are many people born and raised outside Ireland that claim to be Irish today. It wasn't any different back then. The Scots and Irish werent similar or related they were the same culture\civilisation\race they were Gaelic. Definately. No maybees.

Sorry to be so emphatic, It probably seems rude, but I'm as certain about this point as I am that China exists. I cant prove it to someone who doesn't want to believe it, but i believe beyond any reasonable doubt its true.

Really.

:love: Tathy

Deise Abu

KingArthur
Aug 28, 2003, 10:05 AM
Hi Calgacus
Go to the Unit Graphics section and look for gael and pdescobars static leaderhead images. They have a great looking (albeit speculative) Kenneth McAlpine and many others. What's more being static they have a very small file size (=quicker to download)- and don't worry they're still very high quality and fit in well with the "out of the box" leaderheads (in my opinion).
I too am on 56K but realistically I get a fraction of that speed.

EDIT: JUST READ PAGE 2 OF THE POST AND SEE YOU ARE ALREADY AWARE OF GAELS LEADERHEADS.

Originally posted by calgacus
It does for me now, as I am on 58K until I go away to the US in September. :( What leaderhead would you use BTW Yoda?

Pangur Bán
Aug 28, 2003, 11:44 AM
Originally posted by Tathlum
Erm Scotland wasnt always where it is now. The Scots came from Scotland alright but Scotland (the land of the scots) started in Ulaidh (Ulster). There are no cultures in Europe that are not at least partialy mixed but the early Scots were invaders from the Ulster side of what was later Dalriodha\Dal Riodha\Dal Riota. After the Vikings cut the shipping lanes between the Ulster and Scotland parts of Dal Riodha the Ulster portion was conquered by the other kingdoms in Ireland., and the Dal Riodhans on the Scottish side integrated with Picts, Northumbrians, Normans and became the Medieval Kingdom of Scotland. Not everyone in Scotland is descended from Irish invaders\settlers but the Scots are. Both are Gaelic. We share names, language, ledgends and culture.
Welsh are also Celtic but they are not Gaelic. They speak a different Language for a start. They are another Celtic people but they are not Gaelic. Scots are. The original Celts who inhabited what is now Scotland were British Celts like the Welsh. The Scots were Gaelic invaders from Ulster. They were the most successful of the invaders. there were others. Such as the Desi who invaded part of Wales. Even when they lived in Wales they were still Gaelic, spoke Gaelic built Cranogs ( a gaelic type of building but not a British one).
There are many people born and raised outside Ireland that claim to be Irish today. It wasn't any different back then. The Scots and Irish werent similar or related they were the same culture\civilisation\race they were Gaelic. Definately. No maybees.

Sorry to be so emphatic, It probably seems rude, but I'm as certain about this point as I am that China exists. I cant prove it to someone who doesn't want to believe it, but i believe beyond any reasonable doubt its true.


Most of that is basic knowledge. Although I should point out that crannogs in Scotland date to 500 BC, long before traditional history has the "Scots" coming from Ulster. I think that you have missed the point. If there is room at all for argument, then there is no certainty. There is certainly room for doubting some kind of the traditional Ulster invasion account. The Romans speak of Scots in Caledonia before the traditional Irish account has the establishment of Dalriada. It was the continental sub-Roman kingdoms who insisted on calling the Irish "Scots", not necessarily the Romans who occupied Britain. That raises some interesting questions about cross-channel culture in northern Britain during Roman times. I've even heard it suggested that the Gaels themselves might have come from Scotland to Ireland and not the other way about. There is nothing that disproves this, so it remains a possibility. ;)

Tathlum
Aug 29, 2003, 01:48 PM
OK now i think I see where your coming from. True, Scots are mentioned by Romans earlier than the irish invasions of Scotland but Scot means "raider". The Romans where referring to raiders from north of Hadrians wall, not the specific group of raiders that came from Ireland, expanded Dal Riodha and became the Kingdom of Scotland. The earlier use of the word (meaning Raider) realy is a tenuous reason to doubt Irish and Scottish historical records, dozens if not hundreds of history books, Websites and the fact that Scots are undoubted Gaels just like the Irish. Where else could these Gaels have come from? The tribes who existed in Scotland during the Roman invasions were Brythonic Celts not Gaelic. The Kingdom of Dal Riodha was Gaelic, was Irish. There are clear differences between Gaelic and Brythonic Celts, we have a different language for a start.
Right for the sake of agument lets just say that the Scotti mentioned as existing in Scotland were the same tribe as those who later ruled Dal Riodha and not just different groups labeled "Scotti" (raiders) by the Romans. They what fight the Romans, cross the sea set up a kingdom in Ulster and then come back to Scotland as Dal Riodhans? This seems highly suspect but if we assume its true, by the time the cross back into Scotland they have changed from Brythonic Celts to Gaels, culturally, Linguisticaly. The changes they've gone though as an Irish kingdom have obliterated any trace of who they were before they came to Ireland. I a very real sence they have come from Ireland even if Geneticaly they were originaly from Scotland. And despite changing language, customs culture and all their personal names, they have clung on to the tribal name Scots. How is this a more logical explanation than the Romans naming 2 groups of raiders sparated by centuaries as "raiders"? When the spanish "discovered" the new world they called the natives Indians. Does this mean that Apache originated in the Indus valley?
There is a huge weath of evidence, historical records, genealogical, archaological, to support the idea that the Scots originated in Ireland. Their culture and language is not related or influenced to Gaelic, it is Gaelic. Tartan, whiskey, bagpipes, blue woad, claymores, clan and first names, placenames, attitude to life, attitude to the english, music, sectarian problems are all the same. Even after over a thousand years of separate evolution, we are still uncannily similar, still identifiably Gaelic. I could speacK irish gaelic to a scot and be understood. A few words and pronunciations would be differnt but no more different than if I spoke to a Kerryman. In fact i find scottish accents easier to understand than a Kerry accent. This is a lot to ignore for the sake of one word.
I have heard theories saying Scots were picts, Arthurian Britons, even Anglo-saxon, but without any convincing arguements to back this up. Hell, i'd love to believe that the Scots came from somewhere other than Ireland. It would mean Gaelic culture was more widespread than we think, that there were more like us but it would take a lot more to convince me than a single word. It just means Raider. If it were a tribal name that came from a root hero ( Eogannachta, Connachta ) rather than a description (scot\raider or Sennone\old-ones or veterans) then maybee that woulr imply something. But not when it means Raider, its too vague.
Type scottish history into a search engine, pick up a history book and you'll see im not the only one whos certain that the Scots came from Ireland.
I love disscussing Celtic history and the origins of my people. If you have any more evidence to say they might not be of Irish origin, please share. I'll happily admit I'm wrong if it means I learn more, I certainly don't know everything about my history, no-one does. For example I didn't know Scottish Cranogs where quite that old, thanks I sit corrected. But sorry, doubting Scottish origins over the use of as general a word as Scot is just way too much.
Hope to hear more
:love: Tathy

Palmerston
Aug 29, 2003, 02:38 PM
Are these Celtic or Rangers scots??? :-)

Tathlum
Aug 29, 2003, 03:45 PM
:lol: :lol: :lol:
Just saw the size of my last post. Its HUGE. Looks like I took that a little too seriously huh? In fairness to calgacus he never said the Scots weren't from Ireland, he just said it's a possability. While i disagree (obviously) I can happily agree to differ and let others make up their own mind. Thanks for the Mod Cal, I can play as the Gaels without having to do the dirty work myself.:) though you could have left the gallic swordsman animations in as a flavour unit with normal stats for a swordsman.

:love: Tathy

Algernon Pondlife
Sep 27, 2003, 03:08 AM
Hi Calgacus,

I've just spent a few days in Glasgow and picked up a book "Scottish Place-Names" by WFH Nicolaisen. Have you seen that one? There is a detailed discussion in the introduction about Falkirk (Fawkirk, Varia Capella, Eglsbryth, Egglesbreth "=Egglesbrec"). In very brief summary, the conclusion he came to was that the t was a miscopied c in a draft not long after 1080. There is much discussion about the fluctuating predominant language around this and also of the significance of the remoteness of the scribes from the actual place (many were at Lindisfarne but there are also Papal Bulls involved). The translation (for us today) of all the versions seems to be something like "speckled (or 'of various colours') church".

Hope this does not sound boring because I'm finding the book fascinating.

By the way I'm playing Alba all the time just now. Thanks for the splendid work.

Pangur Bán
Sep 27, 2003, 03:55 PM
Yes Algernon Pondlife, I had access to it at home. Unfortunately now, I'm in America and no longer have access to a decent library. So, if you have any corrections, then I'd probably have to take your word for them. ;)

And yeah, I fing this kind of thing fascinating too. You should check out the controversies over the etymology of "Old Aberdeen" (=Alton), "Leith" and "Edinburgh".

I find it pleasing that this thread has attracted ome interesting people. :):goodjob:

gael
Oct 06, 2003, 07:49 PM
This is a poem by Claudius Claudianus(AD 402). de consulatu Stilichonis (on the Consulship of Stilicho).

He refers to the Irish as scots and not seperate from the apparently local term used by the garrison on hadrians wall.

"Next spake Britain clothed in the skin of some Caledonian beast, her cheeks tattooed, and an asure cloak, rivalling the swell of ocean, sweeping to her feet: 'Stilicho gave aid to me also when at the mercy of neighbouring tribes, what time the Scots roused all Hibernia against me and the sea foamed to the beat of hostile oars. Thanks to his care I had no need to fear the Scottish arms or tremble at the Pict, or keep watch along all my coasts for the Saxon who would come whatever wind might blow.'"

It seems strange that the word scot was just a loose term meaning 'raider' that was used by the garrisons on hadrians wall to label the caledonian gaels, yet here a roman/greek poet uses it as a label for all the irish.

Tathlum
Oct 07, 2003, 05:46 AM
The annals written by priests in the early middle ages show that the Irish certainly considered the Dal Riodhans as Irish. Irish kings crossed the sea to fight in scotland for lands they considered theirs. eg. Niall of the Nine Hostages one of the more famous High-Kings of Ireland. Scotland became a Kingdom when Kennedd(Kenneth) Mac Alpin married the daughter of the Pictish King, uniting Pictland and Dal Riodha. He was corronated on the Lia Fail (stone of destiny) that was brought over from Ireland for the occasion.
Irish missionaries to the lands of western Europe were often refferred to as scots or being from Scotia. Dont forget the name Ireland only showed up with the Normans. Many in the Dark ages called the lands of the Gaels "Scotland".Before that it was refferred to as Eiru, Hibernia and many other names, mainly those of goddesses. Annother theory I have heard for the name Scotts is from the goddess Scotta. When the Romans used the word however, it was probably as raider. I dont have definative proof for the root of the word Scot, but I have lots of evidence that the Scotts are Irish.
University College Cork have english translations of the many of the Annals on their Website.http://www.ucc.ie/celt
CELT is the Corpus of ELectronic Texts. In it Dal Riodha is just annother Irish Kingdom. A clear distinction is given between the Irish and "Foreignors"/"Saxons"etc. This is not a Student progect but a propper Scolarly work on Primary Historical resources of our ancient History.

Junkyard_Pope
Mar 24, 2004, 10:04 AM
The Picts themselves were native residents of Britain when the Celts and their culture came over. There was no Celtic "invasion" of any of the British Islands to start with, simply an exchange of people and ideas. The Picts were much more aligned toward the Gaelic Celts, and were literally and figuratively married to the Scotti which were a tribe that most definately had at the least close ties of trade with the picts via sea routes and genealogically were linked with some Picts. Could it simply have been that some Scotti that lived in Ulster moved to the lowlands for a residence?

The Picts and Scotts both form the modern Scottish culture, it's just that the name comes from the Scotti; Both form the culture TOGETHER. Stop Arguing- There was and still is an immense traffic in ideas from Ireland to Scotland and vice versa. They are linked very closely.

Wolfwood
Mar 26, 2004, 12:05 AM
Originally posted by Tathlum
I'd give the UU Att4. Def2, Mov2, ignore move cost of hills and mountains, and possibly woods.

Just want to mention that that is exactly what I gave for the Scottish UU in my personal mod!

Lots of interesting info on scots in this thread! :)

Junkyard_Pope
Apr 03, 2004, 05:51 PM
I would like to add that the Picts had many traits of Gaelic Celts, as they were influenced by them for many years. The Picts also influenced the Gaels in return. For as I mentioned before- it was not a military invasion but a cultural exchange between the Celts and native British Islanders.

But anyhow- Great mod! I enjoy it immensely.

Faboba
Apr 04, 2004, 05:44 AM
Originally posted by KingArthur
:goodjob:

I'll definitely take a look.

I see Ruthirglen in the city lists - is that modern day Rutherglen? That's my home town :)




Really? Whereabouts in Rutherglen are you from?

ScottishAdam05
Jul 02, 2005, 09:16 AM
Can you really go the Scottish Civilisation. Thats one bad thing about civ 3 that I couldnt go my own country. I think that would be much better if you could actualy control your own civ. Who is the leader of the Scots?, Robert the Bruce, James V, possibly even William Wallce????????. This would make diplomacy with the hated English very interesting....

civ4us2006
May 09, 2006, 10:56 AM
Great mod. I had no problems playing it.