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A few thoughts about the enviroment

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by scotland_no1, May 30, 2003.

  1. scotland_no1

    scotland_no1 Jimmy Hat Salesman

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    this may be random, but i came accross this recent survey about the enviroment, this is actually quite scary, P.S. sorry for the anti-bush sentiment, it came with the article.

    here it is:


    The right to a future

    The future belongs to the young. Yet it looks increasingly bleak as industrial and domestic waste is pumped into the land, sea and air; ten acres of rainforest is chopped down every second; almost seven square kilometresof fertile land is reduced to desert every hour; fragile ecosystems are destroyed and one species goes extinct every six minutes. These all add up to long-term consequences such as the depletion of the ozone layer and global warming. The future looks even bleaker when we find out that maniacs like George Bush have the power to veto limits on pollution, and can release an arsenal of nuclear weapons at the touch of a button.

    But none of this is new. For years we have been told about the damage we do to our own environment. We are no longer surprised when we are told that one day, we could quite easily destroy our own planet, and make ourselves extinct. So why does environmental destruction continue? Are humans doomed to their own stupidity?

    what are you views on this?

    here is another statistic:

    The rest of the Euopean Union recycles over 65% of its waste and garbage, however this compared to the UK is astonishing. In the UK we recycle only just over 8% of our rubbish. And in the U.S.A. and Russia they recycle no more than 6%.
     
  2. Thadlerian

    Thadlerian Dreamin' of a RED X-mas!

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    As long as the current system makes it profitable to be an environment criminal, we will have these problems for ever. Or, at least, till the end of the world.

    The 65% value of EU recycling seems a bit exaggerated, though. We don't recycle as much as we are fed to believe.
     
  3. scotland_no1

    scotland_no1 Jimmy Hat Salesman

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    yes you may be right, however germany really are into this recycling business, they recycle everything :)
     
  4. Wolfe Tone

    Wolfe Tone Which Way Did He Go?

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    I would recycle more myself except there are limited facilities here. There are a few bottle banks about but the closets one is about 10 miles away, so it isn't really convinent to load a lot of bottles into the car.
     
  5. polymath

    polymath Tleilaxu Mentat

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    Fortunately our local Sainsbury's has recycling points for paper, bottles, plastic, books, shoes, and clothes, so the wife and I only have to stroll a couple of minutes to dump that stuff. We use it all the time.
     
  6. Mojotronica

    Mojotronica Expect Irony.

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    It's one of those problems that people debate about until the effects can no longer be ignored. Even then it's often dismissed as a "local concern."

    Consumer and industrial material recycling is commendable, but it's actually one of the lesser aspects the problem.

    More compelling threats (IMHO) are:

    Loss of bio-diversity, especially since we are just entering the genetic age. That raw material is irreplaceable.
    Air and water quality.
    Soil erosion and desertification.
    Lost coastline due to global warming.
    The hole in the ozone layer.
    Loss of oxygen-generating foliage.
    Nuclear waste.

    Seattle is one of the best cities for recycling in the US -- well above the national average -- closer to the EU stat.
     
  7. Gothmog

    Gothmog Dread Enforcer

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    Of course you are only talking about a small percentage of the global population. What is at issue here is not really recycling or the environment, it's standard of living. People are willing to recycle (like spitting in the ocean) as long as it doesn't affect their standard of living. Then the real moral question: would you deny the rest of the world the opportunity to bring themselves upto the standard of living we now enjoy? So then the root of the problem becomes... overpopulation as defined by environmental degredation. We are there now and we either need to reduce the impact of humanity per unit of standard of living (through technology IMO), or we need to reduce the global population. No easy answers.
     
  8. Thadlerian

    Thadlerian Dreamin' of a RED X-mas!

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    If any of you UK guys got some contacs with the politicans, please tell them to turn off the Sellafield waste-o-matic plant by the Irish sea. There's hardly any cod left in North Sea, and those there are, are so radioactive we use them for lamps.
     
  9. Mojotronica

    Mojotronica Expect Irony.

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    Everyone is an enviromentalist. We just disagree on what science we support.

    Some favor a very narrow approach to interpreting the scientific data -- if an error is to be made they would rather err on the side of caution, enacting social or legal policies to restrict development and prevent action which could be harmful.

    Others are broad in their interpretation of the data -- they would prefer to err on the side of development, to limit the legal and social restrictions on use of land and resources.

    It's a weird issue, because the most radical elements are the ones everyone thinks about when they think of "environmentalists" or "developers." It seems like an issue where compromise is the exception, rather than the rule.
     

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