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A Valese History of the World Part VI: From Many to Few (650 CE to 1100 CE)

Discussion in 'Civ5 - Stories & Let's Plays' started by Reddawg151, Aug 8, 2013.

  1. Reddawg151

    Reddawg151 Chieftain

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    The sixth entry in the Valese History of the World chronicles a period of social reorganization. As Valia's border and population grew over the last centuries of the first millennium, the old meritocratic system became unable to cope with the internal divisions brought on by the diversity of the empire. At the same time, the strength of the religious institutions would conspire to evolve a new form of government and usher in a new era.

    V. From Many to Few: 650 CE to 1100 CE​

    In 650 CE the Valese council seated in Valance, composed almost exclusively of the wealthiest merchants from the four "national cities" [see footnote], initiated what is arguably their final successful endeavor: the claiming and settling of the Big Island for Valia. The island was to be put under the administration of Far East, from where the fleet battling the Big Islanders originated, while a regiment of bowmen was provided by Tidings. A series of minor skirmishes were fought to clear the way for permanent settlement over the course of the 7th and 8th centuries, culminating in the 800 CE Battle of Big Island. The Valese victory at this encounter effectively ended native control of the island.​

    The Big Island, a resource rich island in the Eastern Sea, was at some point in prehistory settled by peoples originating in Japan to the east. The Valese claim to the island was based off of military and naval might, leading to a brief schism between Tidings and Siam, who also had their eyes on settlement.

    While the eastern half of the country was busy with expansion, Valance was free to undertake large-scale projects. The threat of invasion by Babylon was always present in the Valese consciousness, with some proven conspirators among the Nijai in the west. The Great Wall of Valance was initiated circa the year 680 CE, with the most express purpose of protecting the capital, and the four ancient wonders spread between it and Tidings: the Hanging Gardens, the Great Pyramid, the Great Monoliths, and the Oracle of Cancer in Tidings. ​

    The Great Wall of Valance was completed in 840 CE, bringing the total number of Wonders in Valia to five. Although unknown to the Valese during the Middle Ages, modern scholars of course know that this placed Valia first on the rankings of most large scale projects constructed, one more than the Maya.


    Around the middle of the 9th century, two important events took place. The city of Comings was founded, becoming the official center of the Big Island, and by the end of the century all native encampments were razed. At the same time, a new regional power established the first formal relations with the Valese government: the Celts. Although the Celts were known to the Valese (primarily as some distant rival of the Japanese), they had yet to entreat with their leaders. ​

    The early settlement of Comings in the center of the Big Island, was the first offshore Valese territory.

    The location of the Celtic capital Edinburgh, southwest of Japan. This map dates from circa 850 CE; note the lack of knowledge of a route across the Eastern Sea, and the isolation of the Nijai city Miyasachan in the far west.


    The decision to claim the Big Island two centuries previous was more fortuitous than the Valese council could ever have known-- with the Siamese, Japanese, and Celts on all sides, the city of Comings quickly became a crucial center for international contact, a way station for commerce, military expeditions, and even religious missions. Wihda had by this time become even more central in the lives of most Valese over the centuries, particularly after 770 CE when a great prophet appeared in Valance claiming to be the reincarnation of the founder of the Church. His preachings lead to a reinvigoration of religion that vastly increased its reach and the rate of proselytizing. In fact, this uptick in religious fervor is seen as largely responsible for the gradual shift in Valese politics, from one of meritocracy dominated by commercial interests, to an oligarchy backed by the Church. ​

    Demographers estimate of Valia's rankings in the world circa 900 CE. With rapid growth in the eastern cities, the population passed one million for the first time, putting previously unknown levels of stress on the government and on resources. Over the course of the 10th century unrest grew and grew as infrastructure struggled to keep up with the number of citizens.

    The 10th-11th centuries were perhaps the most transformational yet in the history of Valia. In 940 CE the Writers Guild was established in Far East with the inaugural poetry competition that is still held every 5 years. The famous "Lament of the Valese" was written for this first occasion, famously detailing the unrest of the times:​
    "What tidings bring the Oracle now,
    While the rulers grow fat on crab,
    and the crab eat better than the people..."

    A few seemingly well intended but poorly managed attempts were made by the Council to improve the mood of the common people. In 960 CE the small island north of Comings, known as Banana Island, was purchased by the government for the purpose of cultivating that fruit. However it would be several hundred years before the plantations were of any use. They turned instead to the purchase of coliseums in Tidings and Far East, a measure of appeasement that met with limited success. The most spectacular failure occurred in the year 1000, with the "whale riots of Tidings. In a suspect deal, a particularly zealous (or perhaps just greedy) council member hailing from one of the oldest merchant families, signed a deal to trade whale products with the Siamese in exchange for gold. The promise was made to the regional council in Tidings that new acquired whale hunting grounds off of the Big Island would be exploited, avoiding any disruption in the supplies of goods provided by whaling. This promise was, like that of the banana plantations, not kept, and the ensuing shortages resulted in riots in Tidings that crippled productivity and growth for many years.​




    The southern archipelago was first sighted during the 11th century. Note that at this time, Tidings and Far East (as well as their controlling of Big Island) outstripped Valance in importance. The threat of being "outshined" lead the capital city to turn its attention south, to these newly discovered lands, and to an unlikely new partner: the Nijai in Miyasachan. This realignment of the heart of Valia away from the East and its Siamese sympathies, would have major consequences in the years to come.

    At the start of the 12th century, the complex social forces that had been at work throughout the nation came together to result in a revolution. The ineptitude of the Council, which had ruled for more than a millennium, was blamed for the unrest that was crippling the east and stifling the west. The Wihda church leaders conspired with one council member to proclaim Valia a monarchy, a kingdom ruled by divine right. Arris I was crowned by the patriarch of the church in the year 1100 CE, the Council was disbanded, and the people rejoiced. The tighter control offered by the Crown ended the unrest, leaving Valia a stronger nation and ushering in a golden age of peace, known as the Pax Arrista.



    fin part VI.

    *footnote: the four "national cities", as they are still sometimes called, were Valance, Tidings, Far East, and Miyasachan (modern day Nijazahan). They were so named not only because they are the oldest, but also by right of hosting regional capitols-- Valance for the Central region (and of course for the nation as a whole), and the other three for the North, East, and West, respectively.
    - - - - - - - - - -
    About this story: Many years ago I was active in the Civ community (think AOL file sharing system to download maps!) and we used to post stories and run statistics on our shared games. I've really been enjoying BNW and decided to take some time to do a story. This game was played as the Dutch but with everything renamed, to help suspend disbelief about the plausibility of this reality. The difficulty was Prince level, and many in-game choices were made for the sake of the story, not for the sake of scoring. I have completed the whole game and will include "facts" throughout the history as they become relevant.

    Comments are very welcome!
     
  2. cpm4001

    cpm4001 Goggleman

    Joined:
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    You say comments are welcome. Well, I have a comment:
    The story is very good so far! Looking forward to more!
     
  3. Reddawg151

    Reddawg151 Chieftain

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
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    In this first part of the Valese History of the World, the origins of civilization are told through the eyes of the peoples of the modern day nation state of Valia, beginning with the founding of Valance and concluding with the expansion of the Republic of Valia.

    I. The Dawn of Civilization: 4000 BCE to 3000 BCE​

    Some of what is known about the world prior to the year 4000 BCE is based off of later archaeological records, and the rest is conjectural theories. The Valese people and their tongue are related to the two civilizations on the northern half of the island, Siam and Babylon. Common mythology holds that two great leaders were each exiled from these northern lands, and traveling south came together to found the long-standing capital of Valance where the Tidings River meets the sea. Undoubtedly this myth is an allegory that seeks to explain the commonalities between the Valese and their neighbors, as well as the division between the two major ethnicities that still famously exist in Valia-- the more Babylonian-like western provinces and the more Siamese eastern lands.​


    The establishing of Valance in the foothills southwest of the Tidings River delta, circa 4000 BCE, followed by immediately exploration to the east.

    There is considerable reason to believe that upon the founding of Valance, the Valese people first explored the lands to the east; these would have been unknown to them (and to any other civilized contemporaries), while knowledge of the northern part of the island may have remained with the tribe as they migrates southward. By 3700 BCE the archaeological records indicate that Valese peoples had reached the eastern peninsula and what would become the future site of the city of Far East.​


    Sometime around 3500 BCE, the first major event of international importance in Valese history occurred when contact was established with the Siamese people to the north. The contact between these two cities lead to increased trafficking between them, and ultimately to the founding of a new Valese city at the midpoint between the two capitals.​


    The emblem of the Siamese government is the origin of the wheel symbol of the Wihda religion later established in Valance.

    In the 33rd century BCE, the Valese strengthed the centralization of government and instituted an early for of Republicanism, adopting policies which increased the productivity of the city and ultimately lead to the oldest Wonder still standing today. During this era, exploration accelerated in the north and west, and crucially, contact was made with Babylonian empire. It was around this time that the Nijai dialect developed, heavily influenced by the Babylonians, and the divide between the western parts of the nation and the eastward-facing, Siamese-favoring mainstream of Valese society began.​

    By 3000 BCE Valese influenced stretched nearly across the entire southern half of the island, and ties with Siam and Babylon to the north had begun.

    In conclusion, the stage was set by the beginning of the next millenium, for Valia to spread across the entire southern half of the island. A minority of the population began to dissociate somewhat from dominate culture, and spoke something more similar to what the contemporary Babylonian tribes spoke. This would prove to have enormous consequences for the development of the country, as well as for its neighbors.​

    fin part I.


    - - - - - - - - - -
    About this story: Many years ago I was active in the Civ community (think AOL file sharing system to download maps!) and we used to post stories and run statistics on our shared games. I've really been enjoying BNW and decided to take some time to do a story. This game was played as the Dutch but with everything renamed, to help suspend disbelief about the plausibility of this reality. The difficulty was Prince level, and many in-game choices were made for the sake of the story, not for the sake of scoring. I have completed the whole game and will include "facts" throughout the history as they become relevant.

    Comments are very welcome!
     
  4. Reddawg151

    Reddawg151 Chieftain

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    Messages:
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    In this second part of the Valese History of the World, the growth of the nation of Valia throughout the 3rd millenium before the common era is traced, from the founding of the city of Tidings to the construction of the world's oldest Wonder, the Pyramids of Valance.

    II. Tidings of Greatness: 3000 BCE to 2000 BCE​

    At the end of the fourth millenium, the Valese Republic was wholly centralized in the city of Valance, whose population at the time numbered perhaps 40,000-- by far the largest of the time. Relations with its two neighbors to the north, Siam and Babylon, were generally good-- there is no indication of any significant conflicts. The schism between the Nijai minority and the rest of the Valese population continued to grow, with the western lands being settled primarily by the former.​

    Around 3000 BCE, the Valese Republic was the most populous and productive of its time. The government however was not so popular, bogged down by internal conflicts with the restless Nijai minority population.

    Sometime around the year 2600 BCE, a sizeable exodus took place-- not of the Nijai, as one might expect, but rather of Siamese sympathizers-- this is known because what early records we have of this group were written in a distinct dialect. Their reason for leaving the region of Valance is not clear-- a leading theory is that this group was intended to settle the lands to the north east that had for centuries seen heavy traffic between Valance and its neighbors. This group would travel north toward the Siamese capital of Sukhothai, eventually establishing the city of Tidings between the Tidings River, and the Bay of Big Island.​

    The second major settlement of Valia, Tidings, was established around 2400 BCE, the same time that Valese warriors first encountered the northern Barbarian tribes.



    At the end of the 3rd millenium, Valance had more than doubled in size to roughly 90,000 people, swelled by a large growth of the lowest class citizens, the pyramid laborers. Crude inscriptions found in archaeological sites around the Pyramids suggest that most of these workers were of the Nijai, Babylonian-influenced minority, who by this time constituted perhaps half of the population of the city proper*. ​

    The most ancient of the Ancient Wonders of the World, the Pyramids of Valance, were mostly completed by the beginning of the 2nd millenium BCE. It has been established that originally the largest pyramid, the Pyramid of Arris, was topped with countless semiprecious stones from the (Nijai-worked) gem mines of the west.


    In conclusion, the second millenium of the Valese people's recorded history was one of peaceful expansion and great works. The completion of the pyramid projects lead to a large labor force, who in the next millenium would begin a tradition of public works, vastly improving the infrastructure of the young nation-- and, thanks to their decidedly Nijai bent, would ultimately become the progenitors of the Nijai capital, the metropolis of Nijazahan.​

    fin part II.

    *footnote: Although the city of Valance around the year 2000 BCE was approximately half made up of Nijai, they were still a minority in the country as a whole, with virtually no evidence of them in the "second city" of Tidings, where all things Siamese were the fashion. Ancient artifacts retrieved from that city show a distinctly Eastern aesthetic in the clothing and crafts.


    - - - - - - - - - -
    About this story: Many years ago I was active in the Civ community (think AOL file sharing system to download maps!) and we used to post stories and run statistics on our shared games. I've really been enjoying BNW and decided to take some time to do a story. This game was played as the Dutch but with everything renamed, to help suspend disbelief about the plausibility of this reality. The difficulty was Prince level, and many in-game choices were made for the sake of the story, not for the sake of scoring. I have completed the whole game and will include "facts" throughout the history as they become relevant.

    Comments are very welcome!
     
  5. Fortunus

    Fortunus Chieftain

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2012
    Messages:
    30
    I've always wanted to read something like this!
    I especially like that you renamed things so that any who are already familiar with Duch history wouldn't subconsciously make comparisons to reality.
     
  6. Reddawg151

    Reddawg151 Chieftain

    Joined:
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    In the third part of the Valese History of the World, the first military victories at both land and sea are discussed, as well as major societal and cultural progress that result in the introduction of religion before the end of the second millenium BCE.

    III. Sticks and Stones: 2000 BCE to 1000 BCE​

    After two thousand years, the Valese capital and Valance continued to dominate the country while the only other major city, Tidings, experienced modest growth. The independence of the Nijai minority was heightened, as a ruthless Barbarian tribe in the far west was defeated by primarily Nijai warriors. It seems that the western part of the island at this stage became a de facto concession to the descendants of the slave laborers who had built the Pyramids for the Valese elite. With the vast majority of the population leaving from Valese along the corridot north to Tidings and on to the border with Siam, the western lands were less desirable. These early victories by the Nijai warriors over the primitive tribes seem to have begun the tradition of the nation's best military minds coming from that region.​


    From roughly 2000-1600 BC, Nijai warriors defended the capitol from western barbarian tribes, culminating in a great victory on the western shore.

    While the Nijai were fighting in the west, the rest of the country was making important advances that would lay the groundwork for a more democratic society. Literacy rates increased with the building of libraries in both Valance and Tidings, and embassies were opened with both of the northern neighbors, Babylon and Siam, with whom relations remained friendly. The Babylonians in particular were known to have aided the Nijai, whom spoke a Valese dialect that was stll mutually intelligible with Babylonian, against the barbarians. At some point, the use of slave labor for public works was generally abandoned, and citizenship was granted to a wider swath of the population. A second boom of public works began in the middle of the millenium, further developing the countryside around the central parts of the Valese nation.​


    Conditions for workers in the middle of the 2nd millenium were much improved compared to those who built the pyramids five years previously; archaeological records show evidence of crude health care for those who died erecting the stone monoliths throughout the land to the east of Valance that were commissioned by the Republic in 1300 BCE.


    Late in the 2nd millenium, a new military threat emerged not in the west of the country, where the land was continuously patrolled by Nijai troops, but rather in the east, particularly around Tidings where naval raids become frequent. These skirmishes would plague the region for centuries to come, leading to the development of the navy as an eastern tradition, in contrast to the western preference for military operations on land. ​

    Tidings had grown to nearly 50,000 people by the year 1200 BCE when naval raids become a frequent occurrence. Unlike the Nijai in the west who had assistance from the Babylonians in meeting barbarian threats, the people of Tidings, despite maintaing close ties with the Siamese, had difficulty in removing the threat from their shores.


    The last decades of the millenium were dominated by the conversion of many of the population to a cult that worshipped a sea god. One popular theory for the adoption of this maritime religion is a consequence of the barbarian raiders who brought this belief system from the archipelago to the south of the main island. The later adoption of the ship wheel as the symbol of the Valese religion is likely influenced by this earlier form of paganism, as well as reflecting the Siamese influence in Tidings where the Valese first came into contact with the cult. A fortunate consequence of this belief system was increased prowess at sea, and better taking advantage of the numerous resources of fish, crabs, and pearls across the southern shores of the island.​

    fin part III.




    - - - - - - - - - -
    About this story: Many years ago I was active in the Civ community (think AOL file sharing system to download maps!) and we used to post stories and run statistics on our shared games. I've really been enjoying BNW and decided to take some time to do a story. This game was played as the Dutch but with everything renamed, to help suspend disbelief about the plausibility of this reality. The difficulty was Prince level, and many in-game choices were made for the sake of the story, not for the sake of scoring. I have completed the whole game and will include "facts" throughout the history as they become relevant.

    Comments are very welcome!
     
  7. DudewiththeFood

    DudewiththeFood King

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2013
    Messages:
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    Location:
    Round the Corner
    "crude health care for those who died"?:lol:

    I understand what you mean. The rest of it is nice and I'll look forward to more. It's good to see someone make the effort to come up with names for everything.
     
  8. Reddawg151

    Reddawg151 Chieftain

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
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    haha-- thank you though! Part 5 is on its way right now
     
  9. Reddawg151

    Reddawg151 Chieftain

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
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    The fourth part in our series on the Valese History of the World traces the development of what would become the modern-day heart of the now great nation, with expansion from coast to coast. Another great wonder was built during this era, and contact with the world beyond the home island was established. Socially, two critical developments for the Nijai minority (and for the world) occurred in this millennium: the founding of the Wihda church by a Nijai prophet, and the settling of the Western capital at Nijazahan, called at the time Miyasachan.

    IV. East and West: 1000 BCE to 1 CE​

    Roughly 1,400 years after the first settlers from the capital at Valance left to found Tidings, the newly-empowered Nijai group set out to establish a new city in the west. The area had been sparsely but increasingly populated for several centuries as a consequence of the Barbarian wars, primarily by descendants of the Nijai warriors who were first sent out by the rulers in Valance to defend that city against possible incursions. Around 960 BCE an official license was given the Nijai leadership to settle the western third of the country; 250 years later Miyasachan became the first city with a Nijai majority.​

    Around the beginning of the final millenium before the Common Era, Nijai settlers began concerted efforts to populate the western reaches of Valia, even while the Siamese were working to expand their control from the areas to the north of Tidings.

    In 720 BCE the Nijai founded Miyasachan, Old Nijai dialect for "hot water", so named for the misidentification of the spouts of the whales (which still frequent the waters around modern-day Nijazahan) as geysers. The city was established in the shadow of Mt. Sachan on the banks of the Miya River which flows out of Babylon.

    A widely accepted historical theory explains the boom in expansion in the 1st millenium as a result of the adoption of policies and traditions that lead to much more rapid expansion of the national borders, as the Valese culture became more dominant among the people of the region. Additionally, the ever-Siamese loving population of Tidings was jealous, and perhaps somewhat threatened, by the rise of the Nijai and their contract to settle the west. In 680 BCE the first group of settlers not from Valance set out from Tidings were granted control of the Eastern third of the island. In 520 BCE the city of Far East was established as a counter-balance to Miyasachan-- although of course at this time, the Nijai were still by far a minority within the island as a whole, with perhaps 10% of the population speaking Old Nijai.​

    Far East* was founded on the Eastern shores in a region well known to be dense in flora and fauna and well-suited to raising domesticated animals. Although settled by people from the Tidings region, Far East has never demonstrated the same affinity with Siamese culture as their northern counterpart.


    The second half of the millennium saw Siamese influence further expand at the cost of the Babylonians, as caravan routes between Valance were established with the Siamese capital at Sukhothai-- the infrastructure and economy were much preferable to the Valancians in comparison with the longer and more arduous task of reaching Babylon over the rugged mountains to the northwest. ​

    Some of the most detailed and well-preserved records from this era are found along what is known as the Valance-Sukhotai commerce corridor, where for centuries merchants bartered between the two nations with Tidings as the main way-point.


    Undoubtedly the most well-known date from this millennium not only in Valese but indeed in world history, is the year 320 BCE-- the founding of the Church of Wihda by the Prophet Arris. Arris is said to have been born in Valance to a Nijai mother and a merchant father from Tidings. Over the next several hundred years Wihda would spread across Valia and into Babylon and Siam, adopting along the way the pagan beliefs of the Sea God that had been worshipped in Valia for hundreds of years before.​

    An artist's rendering of Valia in the year 240 BCE during the height of the first Golden Age; Miyasachan in the west had 2 votes in the Representative Council.

    In 240 BCE the system of government that is largely the same as the one in use today was adopted, whereby each region of Valia is given votes on the national council. This system of Representation is regarded as leading to the first Golden Age that saw great prosperity at the close of the millennium. The Nijai controlled only 2 votes out of the 14, a ratio that has changed much.​



    The common era of course began when contact was made between Valia and Japan. Prior to this contact, Valia, Babylon, and Siam believed themselves to be the only civilized people in the world, surrounded only by minor islands populated by crude, barbarous peoples. The Japanese leader Tokugawa quickly placed himself among his peers, signing agreements to open an embassy in Valance in the year 1 C.E., leading to a paradigm shift in international relations that we will examine in Part V of the series.​

    fin part IV.




    - - - - - - - - - -
    About this story: Many years ago I was active in the Civ community (think AOL file sharing system to download maps!) and we used to post stories and run statistics on our shared games. I've really been enjoying BNW and decided to take some time to do a story. This game was played as the Dutch but with everything renamed, to help suspend disbelief about the plausibility of this reality. The difficulty was Prince level, and many in-game choices were made for the sake of the story, not for the sake of scoring. I have completed the whole game and will include "facts" throughout the history as they become relevant.

    Comments are very welcome!
     
  10. blkbltchemie

    blkbltchemie Chieftain

    Joined:
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    Location:
    United States
    This is a great story; I'm really enjoying the in depth history and story-telling especially the cultural heritage you've used to intertwine your people with Siam and Babylon.

    May I ask, how do you do your posts so that the newest is always on top?
     
  11. Reddawg151

    Reddawg151 Chieftain

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    Messages:
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    The fifth installment in the Valese History of the World covers a time of relative tranquility and modest expansion, which allowed for experimentation with a system of meritocracy. The religion of Wihda continued to grow among the people, further adopting the old customs of the pagan sea god that predated it-- this focus on the divinity of the sea was reinforced by the increasing importance of the crab trade, exploration of several islands, and the rise of the navy as the supreme Valese military force.

    V. The Oracle of Cancer: 1 CE to 650 CE​

    The common era began when the three peoples of the Greater Valia island made contact with civilizations from across the sea, beginning with Japan. The seeds of competition were sown when it became clear that there was much of the world left to be discovered, settled, and conquered. In the year 40 CE the Valese naval tradition began in Far East, in juxtaposition to the Western Nijai army. Small fleets of triremes sailed from the far eastern shores of Valia in response to not only Japanese but also Babylonian forces frequenting the Eastern Sea.​

    Valance, at that time ruled by a merchant meritocracy, was ever weary of the Nijai sympathies with Babylon. Alarmed by the presence of Babylonian forces exploring the Southern Sea, they funded the construction of a small flotilla to protect the vital crab fisheries that were becoming central to the Valese economy.

    Over the ensuing century the power of the navy would grow beyond its importance in protecting economic interests thanks to an unlikely ally: the priests of Wihda. The majority of the population in Tidings and in Far East maintained practice of the old pagan ways and worshipped the god of the sea, Bahra-- it is not known whether religious leaders made the deliberate decision to focus on proselytizing among the seamen, both navy and maritime, but it is clear that by the middle of the 2nd century CE all ships carried on them a priest. In 140 CE the island of Wihda was fully charted and declared a sacred land to be left untouched. The religious decree proclaimed that the island was in fact the birthplace of the religion, and that the untouched, largely desolate nature of the land was evidence of God's power. The political institutions were quick to support this decree to lend justification for the Valese claim, forestalling any attempts at settlements by other powers.​

    The desert island of Wihda to the south of Far East remains largely untouched by man to the present day.


    Sometime in the 4th century CE, the renowned classical architect and engineer Sufya of Valance was born on the shores of the Southern Sea, the son of a humble crab fisherman. In one of his writings, Sufya states that he was profoundly influenced by the great stone monoliths east of Valance. In the year 400 CE, Sufya experienced a religious vision after nearly drowning while with his father on a fishing boat. After this incident he became "divinely inspired" to spread the Wihda faith. He traveled to Tidings where he was commissioned to build the fourth Valese wonder and the first outside of the capital. the Oracle of Cancer​

    The Oracle still stands today just south of Tidings.


    By the middle of the millenium, most of the eastern half of the country had converted wholeheartedly to Wihda. The navy had grown in size to support operations in not only the Southern but also the Eastern sea, where the discovery of the Big Island between Greater Valia and Japan sparked a second rush of exploration. The island was found to be populated by barbarian tribes with whom warring became immediately incessant. The prowess of the Valese navy would grow thanks in large part to the decades of battles fought with the Big Islanders, before their eventual defeat and relocation to the rugged Nijai lands in the far west. ​

    At the time of the wars with the Big Islanders, the main tribal settlement was on the southwestern peninsula. Later excavations revealed significant ruins to the east, suggesting that at some point prior to discovery by the Valese, a more civilized society had existed on the island.

    By the middle of the 7th century CE, Valia was on the verge of becoming an empire. The interests of the merchants to protect the vital fishing resources of Valance combined with the desire of the Church to spread Wihdaism, spurring the growth of a powerful navy. The Nijai, who had seen an astonishing rise to power in the previous centuries, watched with growing disquiet as both the Church and the navy were in the hands of the eastern Siamese sympathizers (who had opened the borders to Siam in 180 CE), and no end to their increasing influence was in sight.


    fin part V.




    - - - - - - - - - -
    About this story: Many years ago I was active in the Civ community (think AOL file sharing system to download maps!) and we used to post stories and run statistics on our shared games. I've really been enjoying BNW and decided to take some time to do a story. This game was played as the Dutch but with everything renamed, to help suspend disbelief about the plausibility of this reality. The difficulty was Prince level, and many in-game choices were made for the sake of the story, not for the sake of scoring. I have completed the whole game and will include "facts" throughout the history as they become relevant.

    Comments are very welcome!
     
  12. Reddawg151

    Reddawg151 Chieftain

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    Messages:
    12


    Thank you! I'm glad people are even reading it, that they enjoy it is a bonus!
    To keep the newest post on top, I just edited the original post with the new entry, and then copy/paste the previous entry as a new reply in the thread.

    The moderators have to change the thread title for me, though.
     

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