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AMD vs. Pentium CPU question

Discussion in 'Computer Talk' started by Lotus49, Mar 4, 2006.

  1. RameNoodle

    RameNoodle ND Number 1!

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Bears Country (Illinois)
    I am also currently looking to buy a new computer part by part, and right now, I am definitely going to buy an AMD Athlon and an NVIDIA Geforce 6800(GT?). I think this acronym which I have seen in another person's sig sums up Pentium.
    Produces Erroneus Numbers Through Incomplete Understanding of Math
     
  2. dannyevilcat

    dannyevilcat DESTROYER OF FURNITURE

    Joined:
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    Burnaby B.C.
    I get it already, you don't like ATI.

    If you want to get that card running again, you can get an aftermarket cooler for like $30, but that's not your point is it? Wait, what is your point?

    Before the X1800 series, ATI didn't support SM3 and yet they are perfectly fine cards, whether you choose to believe that or not. Why do care so much about it anyway? When SM4 comes out within a year, your 6800U with it's SM3 isn't going to set on fire or explode or suddenly not play games.

    Like Speedo was saying, IQ may have been debatable before the x1800 series, but IMO it's not with current generation cards. But when 3D comparisons weren't favorable, you brought in 2D quality. I have had more nVIDIA cards than ATI cards, and honestly, how the hell can you tell which is better with the naked eye? 2D looks the same to me.

    Sorry you're not happy with your 9700pro. I never had one, but I know people who have had same generation ATI cards and were very happy with them... certainly they were better performing cards than the FX5 series they were competing against at the time.
    I remember an old TNT2 card I had once, and it would always lock up when playing the Sims. I hated that POS, but I don't use that as an argument to spread FUD about nVIDIA.

    Look, nVIDIA isn't crap, I've never said it was. They can design very nice hardware, and so can ATI.
     
  3. Comraddict

    Comraddict C.IV

    Joined:
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    1,702
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    Iowa
    And both can fail, see the nv FX series for example. But somehow only Radeon can have some serious flaw. I mean it wouldn't cold boot on two motherboards and then it died after 2 yrs of use..what else you need to call it expensive POS?
     
  4. Lotus49

    Lotus49 Emperor

    Joined:
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    Hmmm, interesting - two HD's setup & used as a single drive. Never heard of that. I'll have to look into this. I imagine it's probably to increase perfofrmance when multi-tasking, right?
     
  5. p dandy

    p dandy Prince

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2003
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    365
    I feel your pain. I also bought one of the first p4s they put out. Highly dissappointed but dealt with it for about 5 years. I think it's about time for a change of pace. I might even get an AMD tonight. We'll see.
     
  6. Speedo

    Speedo Esse Quam Videri

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    There are a variety of types of RAID, depending on what you need it for.

    Striping (aka RAID0, even though it isn't truly RAID) doesn't work quite the way you might think. With it, a piece of data is split into chunks, and those chunks are split evenly between the drives. ie, chunk 1 goes on drive 1, chunk 2 on drive 2, chunk 3 on drive 1, and so on.

    This means striping has some nice advantages: You can get significantly faster sustained read rates than a single drive, and it's great in situations where you have to handle very large I/O.

    It does come with risks though:
    -Your risk of drive failure is effectively doubled (if either physical drive fails the array is gone)
    -If a drive does fail, there's no recovering any data from the other drive
    -If the RAID controller hiccups and causes corruption, the above also applies = no recovery, just rebuild the array and start from scratch

    Which isn't to say that they'll blow up on you all the time. My main comp uses a striped array and I've never had a single problem with it. If you're going use one you just need to acknowledge the risk, but you shouldn't use it unless you have a plan/means to maintain efective backups of your data (unless of course you don't mind using everything).
     
  7. Lotus49

    Lotus49 Emperor

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    ^But that's RAID0 you were talking about just then, not 'true RAID'. So, shouldn't I go w/ that one instead - is it less risky? Better?
     
  8. Drool

    Drool Chieftain

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    AMD all the way!
     
  9. Speedo

    Speedo Esse Quam Videri

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    That's just a pet peeve of mine. RAID stands for Redundant Array of Independent Disks. Striping/RAID0 doesn't include any redundancy, so it technically doesn't qualify as RAID.

    The other most common RAID levels (types) don't give performance increases like striping/RAID0. They have a different purpose, namely redundancy or fault tolerance, meaning that they protect you from losing data if a drive fails.

    RAID1 (aka mirroring) essentially uses the second drive to make an automatic copy of the data which goes on the first drive. So, if either drive fails, no data is lost - however the cost is that only half of the disk space is useable. Ie if you put 2 100GB drives into a mirrored array, you end up with 100GB of useable space.

    RAID5 provides fault tolerance and a more efficient use of the disk space, using 'parity bits.' (don't ask me how it works 'cause I really don't know) The disadvantage is that you have to use a minimum of 3 drives in the array, but 2/3 of that space is useable. Ie you build a RAID5 with 3 100GB disks, and you will have 200GB useable.
     

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