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American Universities will now be all white and Asian

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Archbob, Jul 4, 2018.

  1. Archbob

    Archbob Ancient CFC Guardian

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  2. Synsensa

    Synsensa Warlord Retired Moderator

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    What a daft motivation behind an inevitably racial policy.

    Your next administration is going to have a grand old time rebuilding.
     
  3. Archbob

    Archbob Ancient CFC Guardian

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    WWIII is coming you know, there will be no next administration. I'm gathering my forces and preparing to become a regional warlord in the next few years.
     
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  4. Kyriakos

    Kyriakos Alien spiral maker

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    Asian students must really be part of the white/patriarchy to be there in such numbers. ^_^

    Well, i think it makes sense still to have some racial guidelines regarding acceptance for scholarship, ie no-fee acceptance. But i am not sure if simple acceptance (where the student still pays fees) has much of a reason to factor race. I mean if the student has economic issues due to racial background, and has to pay fees, won't this make things for him/her/non-binary even more difficult?
    Stats on relative drop-out rate for such beneficiaries would also be poignant, imo.
     
  5. Ryika

    Ryika Lazy Wannabe Artista

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    Do Asian Kids not also come from disadvantaged families?
     
  6. plarq

    plarq Crazy forever

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    That is so stupid. Blocking people's route of climbing up social ladder.
    But wait, I don't think today's US education can help you climb the ladder anyway.
    I hope people realize that they don't need the diploma, they just need skills which can be taught for free through MIT Opencourseware and other freely available stuff.
     
  7. plarq

    plarq Crazy forever

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    We were Darwined into exam machines. Malaysian Chinese beat Malays in Malay language exams.
     
  8. Kyriakos

    Kyriakos Alien spiral maker

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    I suppose that, apart from a few specific uni degrees (eg physics, or tech-related etc), most Bachelor holders are unlikely to make as much as people who just know a trade. Of course knowing a trade isn't quite as prestigious, which is why many (in some countries the vast majority- eg Greece) opt for uni almost regardless.
     
  9. plarq

    plarq Crazy forever

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    Most diplomas in US are not worth their tuition. So forcing poor families not to attend universities might be a blessing in disguise.
     
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  10. Kyriakos

    Kyriakos Alien spiral maker

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    I suppose you are being ironic. Fwiw that wasn't my point; i just noted that a simple BA is unlikely to allow students who weren't chosen for being best at what they aim to study, to repay their large studying fee debt, so yes if they come from a poor background (often the case for minorities) it can be even more difficult.
    That said, literally any student can end up like that. My own BA didn't exactly make me a fortune. Of course i set to get at least an MA, but life sometimes doesn't work as planned.
     
  11. plarq

    plarq Crazy forever

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    First, the student loans come with 10% APR, second, it cannot be forgiven even if you declare bankruptcy.
    Link:https://supersavingtips.com/bankruptcy-discharge/.
    See? Students loans cannot be canceled by bankruptcy.
    If you learn a trade, it might not earn you much, but you wouldn't be indebted for life.
     
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  12. Kyriakos

    Kyriakos Alien spiral maker

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    Sure, but "working class" mentality is rapidly diminishing in most of the west anyway. I mean it still exists in places like England, but that is an exception, and most euro countries have native populations which aren't at all into doing the jobs they identify as "menial". And those can include even actual trades, ie jobs that not any random layman can do.
     
  13. plarq

    plarq Crazy forever

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    While I still resent Chinese autocracy and bad salaries, I am grateful that the government only charged me $3000 for undergrad tuition.
     
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  14. Ryika

    Ryika Lazy Wannabe Artista

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    "More African-Americans are going to college than ever before. But according to new research from the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University, African-American college students are more likely to pursue majors that lead to low-paying jobs, setting up many for future debt and underemployment. And over time these occupational choices contribute to the wealth and opportunity gap between whites and blacks that spans generations.

    “Basically, African-Americans have been going to the right church but sitting in the wrong pew,” director Anthony Carnevale said. “In a way they are using education to climb the social and economic ladder, but they’re being steered toward majors that will make them low-earners.”
    https://www.pbs.org/newshour/educat...r-represented-among-low-paying-college-majors

    :eek:
     
  15. plarq

    plarq Crazy forever

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    Several explanations:

    1. Good jobs require more difficult majors which most people, not only blacks, would choose to avoid. In my short career as a teaching assistant, most students were poor in math, and they were not liberal arts students. Therefore, choosing a more rewarding major might mean that they never graduate.
    2. Racism might be a factor so the equally qualified job seekers might be knocked out.
    3. The relative poverty* makes people focused on short-term gains with long-term negative consequences.

    *: Relative poverty is phenomenon that your relatives may affect your income level.
     
  16. Ryika

    Ryika Lazy Wannabe Artista

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    But that article pretty much argues that black people go into these fields more. It compares the different fields and simply compares the percentage of black people in certain majors and comes to the conclusion that black people get degrees in majors that lead towards low-earning jobs. Of course there might be other factors at play, for example, lower standards of basic education making it harder for black people to compete in more difficult majors, but in general, the article seems to suggest that it's mostly the choices that black people make:

    "Another reason for the disparity is merely personal choice. Many service-oriented majors lead to careers that are vital to political and social movements in poor, minority communities around the country. And the study indicates that African-Americans who have strong community-based values enter into college majors that reflect those values. Despite comprising just 12 percent of the population, African-Americans are 20 percent of all community organizers.

    The center also points out that the majority of college-educated African-Americans earn their degrees from two-year institutions or open-admission four-year colleges and universities. Seventy percent of African-Americans who graduate from college attended an open-admission school. With a few exceptions, these institutions not only have limited majors and course offerings, but also lack personnel and academic resources for consistent mentorship. Often, the result is a black student being what Carnevale calls “risk adverse,” or shying away from the unfamiliar."

    “We don’t want to say education is a bad thing for African-Americans because it’s not,” Carnevale says. “On the other hand, to the extent that choices are limited and experience is limited, the pursuit of their passion needs to be informed. Chasing your dreams shouldn’t turn into a nightmare.”
     
  17. plarq

    plarq Crazy forever

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    Yep, I can see the problems come from lower academic credential, so that they are more or less forced to choose easier courses. Because my university (in US) is also low in ranking, I have seen enough students of all kinds of skin color struggling for (IMAO) very simple concepts. In a Darwinist sense, they are selected to perform poorly here. As African-American students had lower SAT scores on average, it seems that they are conditioned to those problems.

    IMO higher education is more likely a luxury than any other kind of merchandise. Your connection is only useful when you can afford better social standing.
     
  18. warpus

    warpus In pork I trust

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    Doesn't this dynamic repeat itself wrt to gender as well? Women tend to get degrees that also lead to lower-earning jobs than the degrees men tend to go into, which is how we get that "wage gap" thing.
     
  19. Traitorfish

    Traitorfish The Tighnahulish Kid

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    That's not really clear in practice.

    What you do often find is that people who enter trades have better short-term prospects: if they're in an in-demand trade, they can almost work into a job with decent pay, where a lot of graduates will find themselves under-employed and/or over-qualified. But that's not a predictor of lifelong income, and young tradesman are likely to see their earnings cap out pretty soon unless they are part of a minority who manage to work their way into foreman (i.e. management) positions, or go independent. In contrast, degree-holders will broadly tend to see a steady if modest increase in income over their working lives, and will tend to be more affluent than tradesman by middle age.

    A lot of it will depend on whether these historical trends hold up, which is difficult if not impossible to say in advance.
     
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  20. plarq

    plarq Crazy forever

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    If you want higher income, college degree is an accelerator. But what does an accelerator do when you can't kick start? A white elephant which is also expensive.

    On the other hand, I knew a couple surgeons who were both from poor families. They racked up $300,000 in student loans, start working at their 30s, paid off their debts and became millionaires with their own diligence. That was the American dream.
     

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