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Ask a Musician

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Ceoladir, Oct 23, 2011.

  1. Ceoladir

    Ceoladir Inconceivable!

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    Any music related questions go here!

    If you are a musician, please post the instruments you play here, experience with instrument is optional.

    Me personally:

    Piano (since 4yo, took lessons until 4th grade)
    Violin (haven't picked it up in years, but played for about 4 years, starting in K)
    Guitar (first picked it up at around 8yo, but really started playing in 8th grade and really really started playing last June)
    Trumpet (since 4th grade)
    French Horn (played all through 8th grade only)
    Baritone/Euphonium (since 9th grade)

    For reference, I'm a junior now.

    Sorry if OP is hard to understand. :(
     
  2. Camikaze

    Camikaze Administrator Administrator

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    What do you consider a 'musician' (or how do you differentiate it from 'someone who plays an instrument')?

    (Also, is there a particular reason you'd prefer here to A&E?)
     
  3. Ceoladir

    Ceoladir Inconceivable!

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    I suppose I keep a rather low standard for musicians. I guess I would define a musician as "one who can play an instrument fluently," as in, be able to carry a few basic tunes on it. That probably comes from playing with a lot of people who can hardly do such. I'm sure other's have much stricter guidelines.

    I would think that you would be more likely to get people with questions here, as A&E is probably inhabited with a higher percentage of musicians already.
     
  4. jtb1127

    jtb1127 Chieftain

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    Is music going to be the focus of your career?
     
  5. Mango Elephant

    Mango Elephant Chieftain

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    I play an acoustic guitar, but I play exclusively bluegrass.
     
  6. Ceoladir

    Ceoladir Inconceivable!

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    I have been considering it deeply, I do not know.
     
  7. Hygro

    Hygro soundcloud.com/hygro/

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    I would just like to offer myself to those with questions about certain kinds of composition and production.
     
  8. MjM

    MjM Chieftain

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    A&E sucks and is dominated by 2-4 posters.

    Which is your favorite instrument?
    What is your favorite kind of music?

    For Hygro:
    How many shows have you DJ'd?
     
  9. Hygro

    Hygro soundcloud.com/hygro/

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    I lost count. Definitely under 100. About a dozen really cool ones. I stopped hustling myself for gigs about 18 months ago and have since put almost all my music focus on production (average week about 15 hours, not uncommon for me to spend 60 hours a week).

    To be a famous DJ you need a strong brand. To have a strong brand you need to be a successful producer. But once I found myself in the groove of producing my own music (none signed or for sale yet although if I wanted to push it I could) I found that to be more fun and rewarding unto itself than DJing ever was.
     
  10. Camikaze

    Camikaze Administrator Administrator

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    This should make for a really cool thread. Only problem might be a high responder to questioner ratio, though. I'm happy to answer questions too (am working on an AMusA diploma for piano to hopefully complete next year), and I know there are many other musicians here as well (would be nice to have Mirc back). Hopefully there's enough questions to keep it going!

    What instrument are you most proficient in?
    Given the number of instruments you play, you seem to have a certain affinity for music in general. Is this something that runs in your family/do you put this down to your upbringing?
    How do you divide your time between the two Ps (practicing and playing (or even the 3rd, performing))?

    Fair enough.

    How do you start off composing a new song? Think of a riff and work around that, or base it off a certain beat?
     
  11. downtown

    downtown Crafternoon Delight

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    I'm also a musician. I've played drums for around 12 years or so (drum set, marching percussion, steel drums), and I've worked as a professional musician before...both as a performer, and as a teacher.

    For Gamez, what kind of music career is most appealing to you? As a member of an orchestra, or a band teacher?
     
  12. Boundless

    Boundless Chieftain

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    The walled city, UK
    Singer - grade 8, since age 4. I'm a top soprano, mainly sing baroque but also partial to jazz and musicals (though I have a strong dislike of musicals other than anything by Gershwin!)
    Piano - grade 8, since age 7
    Clarinet - grade 7, since age 11 - haven't played in an orchestra for about 3 years now though.
    Bass clarinet alongside that.
    Violin - did for 3 years, pretty awful though.
    Recorder
     
  13. Hygro

    Hygro soundcloud.com/hygro/

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    This is a good question, and there isn't any one answer, but here's one of my more productive workflows that I use for more pop sounds.

    Start with chord progression. Insert basic melody riff based on chord progression. Add some really basic drums. Add bassline that goes with drums and the melody. Keep playing them, looping them. As you do, keep adding more and more and more and more. Eventually you'll have this really convoluted, busy loop that, while everything goes together, it will be too much. That's when you begin some basic arrangement of your motifs. See what parts best flow it what other parts.

    With a lot of practice this part shouldn't take more than a couple hours. And then the real fun and hard work begins.


    Sometimes you want to start with other parts of the track, like the hook or the bass--it depends on your mood. But for what I make startign with chord progressions is the fastest and has lead to a lot of my favorite results.
     
  14. Ceoladir

    Ceoladir Inconceivable!

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    Oh, you mean for people that answer questions... :p

    Then, probably just anybody who actually knows what they are talking about. Not the dudes who say arpeggio to get laid. Like this guy:


    Link to video.

    edit: On second thought, he knows a bit more then I remembered.
     
  15. DroopyTofu

    DroopyTofu Double Bass Double Bass

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    I've played the Upright Bass (aka double, string, standup or violin bass) for five and a half years and I've also played the bass guitar for about three years. I can play enough guitar and piano to convince a stranger with no musical knowledge that I'm a good player, but I know relatively little in reality. I'm slowly working on getting better at singing. I don't know how much good I'll be at answering questions, but I figured I might as well introduce myself.
     
  16. Ceoladir

    Ceoladir Inconceivable!

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    Also, feel free to generally discuss music here, and even post your own work! However, take any really serious discussion to its own thread.
     
  17. Ceoladir

    Ceoladir Inconceivable!

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    The guitar is my favorite instrument, and I like all kinds of music. However, I generally listen to blues, rock, with the occasional country song. That said, I've always wanted to learn flamenco.

    I would say I'm most proficient with the guitar, but that mostly comes from a lack of practice with the piano.

    I've always been around musicians, but there are not very many in my family. I'd say that comes from attending an arts school, so I have had music classes all my life.

    For me, playing is a form of practicing. That said, I like to improvise a lot, but I do work out new songs occasionally.

    Neither of those honestly appeal very much to me. Unless you interpret orchestra as a blues/rock band.
     
  18. DroopyTofu

    DroopyTofu Double Bass Double Bass

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    Gamez (or anyone interested), where did you get most of your musical learning? School music classes, private lessons, or teach yourself?

    Also:
     
  19. Mr. Dictator

    Mr. Dictator A Chain-Smoking Fox

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    What are you guys' thoughts on this?

    Spoiler :
    from Christian Schubart's Ideen zu einer Aesthetik der Tonkunst (1806)

    C Major
    Completely Pure. Its character is: innocence, simplicity, navety, children's talk.

    C Minor
    Declaration of love and at the same time the lament of unhappy love. All languishing, longing, sighing of the love-sick soul lies in this key.

    Db Major
    A leering key, degenerating into grief and rapture. It cannot laugh, but it can smile; it cannot howl, but it can at least grimace its crying.--Consequently only unusual characters and feelings can be brought out in this key.

    C# Minor
    Penitential lamentation, intimate conversation with God, the friend and help-meet of life; sighs of disappointed friendship and love lie in its radius.

    D Major
    The key of triumph, of Hallejuahs, of war-cries, of victory-rejoicing. Thus, the inviting symphonies, the marches, holiday songs and heaven-rejoicing choruses are set in this key.

    D Minor
    Melancholy womanliness, the spleen and humours brood.

    Eb Major
    The key of love, of devotion, of intimate conversation with God.

    D# Minor
    Feelings of the anxiety of the soul's deepest distress, of brooding despair, of blackest depresssion, of the most gloomy condition of the soul. Every fear, every hesitation of the shuddering heart, breathes out of horrible D# minor. If ghosts could speak, their speech would approximate this key.

    E Major
    Noisy shouts of joy, laughing pleasure and not yet complete, full delight lies in E Major.

    E minor
    Nave, womanly innocent declaration of love, lament without grumbling; sighs accompanied by few tears; this key speaks of the imminent hope of resolving in the pure happiness of C major.
    F Major
    Complaisance & Calm.

    F Minor
    Deep depression, funereal lament, groans of misery and longing for the grave.

    F# Major
    Triumph over difficulty, free sigh of relief utered when hurdles are surmounted; echo of a soul which has fiercely struggled and finally conquered lies in all uses of this key.

    F# Minor
    A gloomy key: it tugs at passion as a dog biting a dress. Resentment and discontent are its language.

    G Major
    Everything rustic, idyllic and lyrical, every calm and satisfied passion, every tender gratitude for true friendship and faithful love,--in a word every gentle and peaceful emotion of the heart is correctly expressed by this key.

    G Minor
    Discontent, uneasiness, worry about a failed scheme; bad-tempered gnashing of teeth; in a word: resentment and dislike.

    Ab Major
    Key of the grave. Death, grave, putrefaction, judgment, eternity lie in its radius.

    Ab Minor
    Grumbler, heart squeezed until it suffocates; wailing lament, difficult struggle; in a word, the color of this key is everything struggling with difficulty.

    A Major
    This key includes declarations of innocent love, satisfaction with one's state of affairs; hope of seeing one's beloved again when parting; youthful cheerfulness and trust in God.
    A minor
    Pious womanliness and tenderness of character.

    Bb Major
    Cheerful love, clear conscience, hope aspiration for a better world.

    Bb minor
    A quaint creature, often dressed in the garment of night. It is somewhat surly and very seldom takes on a pleasant countenance. Mocking God and the world; discontented with itself and with everything; preparation for suicide sounds in this key.

    B Major
    Strongly coloured, announcing wild passions, composed from the most glaring coulors. Anger, rage, jealousy, fury, despair and every burden of the heart lies in its sphere.
    B Minor
    This is as it were the key of patience, of calm awaiting ones's fate and of submission to divine dispensation.

    Translated by Rita Steblin in A History of Key Characteristics in the 18th and Early 19th Centuries. UMI Research Press (1983).
     
  20. Camikaze

    Camikaze Administrator Administrator

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    I don't see what modern tonality has to do with modality, or with different keys have a different flavour. Some keys are more likely to be used for certain types of compositions, I guess (can't think of any examples) due to range limitations, but then it's not the key providing the character, but the instrument. Nothing to me makes C Major sound more simple than the 'difficult struggle' of A flat minor, and I would more likely associate those characteristics the other way around if anything.
     

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