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Ask a Vegetarian/Vegan

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by cybrxkhan, Oct 24, 2011.

  1. downtown

    downtown Crafternoon Delight

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    What's the best base for veggie burgers....black beans or chickpeas?
     
  2. duckstab

    duckstab Child of Noble Family

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    It's worth noting that many Buddhists are not strict vegetarians, and that the Buddha's own position on this was rather more nuanced.

    Under the vinaya, the original rules established by the Buddha for his monks and nuns, all food had to be obtained on daily alms rounds. They weren't allowed to store food and they were expected to eat whatever was offered, even if it contained meat. Apparently the Buddha determined it was more important for monks to have daily contact with the community, and for lay people to have an opportunity to gain good karma through practicing generosity.

    Gil Fronsdal has a great talk on this subject:

    http://audiodharma.org/talks/audio_player/2118.html

    I myself was OLV for many years. I later added the occasional fish for health reasons, and if somebody offers me something they cooked with meat in it I'll typically eat it. But I still go vegetarian in restaurants and when I'm cooking for myself.
     
  3. NovaKart

    NovaKart شێری گەورە

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    For those who have never eaten meat in their lives I'm really curious, do you think you've accidentally tried it before? Have you ever eaten something with animal broth or flavoring in it? A lot of refried beans have some animal product in it. My stepmother once made some soup with a fish flavoring and we had a vegan guest who got sick after eating it. Is it difficult for you when you're eating at people's houses or are most of your friends vegetarian or vegan?
     
  4. vyapti

    vyapti Prince

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    I never bring up my diet unless I am asked. Usually, when asked, the person is usually interested in nutritional aspects, politics or generally curious. Occasionally someone will be offended by my diet, which I don't understand at all.

    Chickpea burgers! Of coarse this is personal preference, but chickpeas have a better texture and a more neutral flavor for burgers.

    For people that know me well, it isn't difficult. I've already coached them on what I eat and don't eat. For others I will usually offer to bring something, ask query the food ingredients or politely decline. I hate catered events.
     
  5. cybrxkhan

    cybrxkhan Asian Xwedodah

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    I dunno. I say it's because it's "not normal" and it kind of makes people question things, sort of like how people with green hair and such would make you second guess them or something. It could also be because vegetarians and vegans are identified with tree-huggers or those New Age types, particularly the more preachy ones - i.e., "Stop eating meat you evil carnivores!" - so normal people just feel pissed off at all vegetarians and vegans or something.

    I dunno.

    The best base is mass produced, processed soy material.


    Yup. Very well aware of that. Legend has it the Buddha died because he ate rotten pork (or something like that). The stereotype that Buddhists should be vegetarian holds even among Buddhists.


    You can call it an occupational hazard. I've "accidentally" eaten meat tons of times before. One time it was because my friends thought it would be a nice prank to stuff a piece of chicken in my veggie burger (that was in Middle School). However, I've never gotten sick when I accidentally ate meat. I think it does vary from person to person. My brother, for instance, once really wanted to try salami - and he threw up right after; however, he later tried chicken, and didn't feel anything (he's still vegetarian, by the way).

    Personally, as I said, it's like an occupational hazard. I just deal with it, and try to minimize the accidents as much as possible, so to speak.
     
  6. Mechanicalsalvation

    Mechanicalsalvation -

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    I am a vegetarian becouse of my yoga and meditation practise. When I eat meat I notice change of my consciousness...


    I am a vegetarian chef and there is plenty of decent dishes. Today I have made(I work in small place ATM) italian pepperonata with savory polenta, the day before pumpkin/sweet potato curry

    I have made that choice.


    No problemo. Survival first.

    No thanks.


    I do wear lether and other but try to avoid it.

    I dont but there are many very good reasons to promote the vegetarian diet...
     
  7. Zelig

    Zelig Beep Boop

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    How would you reconcile your vegetarianism for environmental reasons if the most environmentally friendly way to farm fruits/vegetables/grains/legumes was to do so on the same plot of land as animals requiring regular slaughter?
     
  8. cybrxkhan

    cybrxkhan Asian Xwedodah

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    I also am vegetarian for ethical reasons, so I'd still be vegetarian.

    Anyhow, for me, this doesn't really matter too much in a more practical sense. I'm pretty sure a lot of the food I eat was also made in factories or places where they also processed or made meat, so I don't really mind.
     
  9. SS-18 ICBM

    SS-18 ICBM Oscillator

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    What do you think are the best flavors to cook your protein sources (tofu, beans, lentils, etc) with?

    What are some interesting dishes you make and/or eat?
     
  10. cybrxkhan

    cybrxkhan Asian Xwedodah

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    I like to cook my protein sources where they come from. What I mean is that I like to use tofu in Asian dishes, since tofu is mostly used in Asian dishes, at least originally; beans in Hispanic dishes; and so forth. For imitation meat, I usually cook it as if I were cooking with real meat - so for instance, I might use imitation ground beef in chili or tacos, or use imitation beef in pho, and so forth.


    Again, I generally like to use imitation meat as if I were cooking with real meat. To give more examples, for instance, I could use imitation patties to make veggie burgers, or imitation chicken nuggets and eat them with ketchup or something. I also enjoy some Chinese (or Americanized Chinese) dishes that dump a whole crapload of sauce over tofu. I remember one time when I was like 10 or something, I ate about at least 5 entrees worth of "Homestyle Tofu" from this one take-out restaurant my family used to order from.
     
  11. Zelig

    Zelig Beep Boop

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    That wasn't really my question though.

    Let me rephrase:

    How would you justify on ethical grounds, being a vegetarian if it were environmentally damaging?
     
  12. jtb1127

    jtb1127 Deity

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    Would you eat meat if the animals were not sentient?
     
  13. uppi

    uppi Deity

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    Is there a name for people who eat meat but no animal products?
     
  14. cybrxkhan

    cybrxkhan Asian Xwedodah

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    I'd use the same justification I'd be using now for ethical grounds - I don't want to hurt them animals. Environmentally damaging or not, my first and foremost reason for being vegetarian is because I don't want to partake in animal slaughter - the other reasons, including environmental reasons, come second.

    Does that... answer your question better?


    Probably? It depends on how you define "sentient", though.


    I don't know of any such term, and Wikipedia doesn't seem to have an answer either.
     
  15. carmen510

    carmen510 Deity

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    What do you guys think about fruititarians?
     
  16. jtb1127

    jtb1127 Deity

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    Definition: Sentience is the ability to feel, perceive or be conscious, or to have subjective experiences.
     
  17. cybrxkhan

    cybrxkhan Asian Xwedodah

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    I tend to look upon them with a mix of ridicule that they'd go that far for their principles, and also admiration that they'd go that far for their principles. Personally I've never met or known a fruititarian, but I feel it's too difficult a diet for most people to sustain - you already have to watch for certain nutrients if you're a vegetarian and vegan, but at least there's already a market out there for you; fruititarians have a much more difficult time making sure they get their nutrients. I also wonder how they survive going out to restaurants.


    Hmm.

    I was raised Buddhist, so generally our definition of sentience is any animal, period, since we consider any animal to have some degree of feelings or perception or consciousness. From what I know, however, scientifically not all animals are considered to be sentient, and which ones are and aren't is kind of debateable.

    If we use the Buddhist definition, then my answer would be yes. If we use any other definition, my answer would still be a yes, albeit a weak one. If it helps, I think I'll be able to eat sponges even though they're considered part of the animal kingdom. My minimal borderline for what constitutes an "animal" in the sense of a vegetarian would probably be around the level of a jellyfish.
     
  18. Berzerker

    Berzerker Deity

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    I didn't know that, I've cut way down on animal protein so I'd better continue with the b12 supplements.

    any other vitamins found lacking in a vegan diet?
     
  19. innonimatu

    innonimatu Deity

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    Would that make animals killed from natural causes fair game for your kind of vegetarian? Of would you hold that even an animal verified to be dead from natural causes and proper for consumption should go to waste?


    What's the consensus now on possible health problems/advantages of vegetarianism?


    Is a vegetarian diet cheaper or actually more expensive than a regular one? Should be cheaper (the less resources used thing), but as I understand it usually involves some "meat replacement products" which (being produced in small quantities) I was wondering might be more expensive.

    (no, I don't intent to give up eating animals, just wondering)
     
  20. cybrxkhan

    cybrxkhan Asian Xwedodah

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    I think I would be fine eating an animal that died from natural causes, in theory. This actually reminds me of a Tibetan monk who's a friend of mine; he was trying to stay on a vegetarian diet, but he also agreed with me on that - the point of not eating meat is so that, in theory, you don't cause suffering to the animal by killing it (whether directly or indirectly). So, if it died of natural causes, it should be fine.


    From what I've heard, there are no problems per se with vegetarianism, in the sense that like non-vegetarian diets, the important thing is to get all the nutrients you need. I don't know as much about health advantages of vegetarianism, other than that you avoid certain diseases or illnesses like mad cow disease since... well, you don't eat the meats that might give them. I also heard that it helps keep you leaner, but I've met tons of overweight vegetarians, so I'm not so sure about that. Again, the important thing is getting all the nutrients you need.


    Many people - including vegetarians - like to say it's more expensive, at least from my experience, but I'm not so sure about that. Certainly the imitation meat might be more expensive, since there isn't as big a market as real meat, but most of the vegetarians and vegans I know manage fine, including my own family. Frankly it's hard for me to compare personally, because I've never really bought meat before (since I was vegetarian since birth), so I'm not too sure on this. Also, if you don't eat a lot of imitation meat, I mean the beans and eggs and other protein sources still cost the same as if you were a non-vegetarian, anyways, right?
     

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