1. We have added a Gift Upgrades feature that allows you to gift an account upgrade to another member, just in time for the holiday season. You can see the gift option when going to the Account Upgrades screen, or on any user profile screen.
    Dismiss Notice

Brexit Thread VI - The Knockout Phase ?!?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Hrothbern, Mar 22, 2019.

Tags:
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Arakhor

    Arakhor Dremora Courtier Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Messages:
    33,042
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    UK
    Turing's conviction, although misplaced, was carried out under the laws of the time. He, however, received his punishment, unlike Meechan who claims to have refused to pay the fine. Maybe, in 15 or 20 years, public opinion will have turned against that provision of the Communications Act and it will have been repealed.
     
  2. Cheetah

    Cheetah Deity

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2002
    Messages:
    7,800
    Location:
    the relative oasis of CFC
    Morally, it was always a bad law, though.

    The pug-thing doesn't seem like a correct sentencing either, to me, but if there's some further context about the person that I'm not aware of, I'll yield on that.
     
    Kyriakos likes this.
  3. metatron

    metatron unperson

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2002
    Messages:
    3,754
    You are dodging the argument about plausible deniability.

    We can take it a step further: One could rob a gas station, basically by verbal threat and with the use of prop gun, and once caught claim it was all "a joke" or "performance art" or something like that.
    That's obviously not credible. In no small part because the gainful effect of the crime was achieved.

    It is not clear this happened in Meechan's case as Tom Walker has noted in his piece criticising the ruling in the sharpest of tones:
    "The [copulating] EDL is not watching the video of a "nazi" pug dog going: 'Yeah, that portrays us in a good light!' Find me one Neo-Nazi who is using that youtube clip as a recruiting tool!"

    Of course there is the irony that far right forces are actually using the controvercy and the ruling as a recruiting tool.
     
  4. Kyriakos

    Kyriakos Alien spiral maker

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    55,281
    Location:
    Thessalonike, The Byzantine Empire
    I think it would have been a far better development to not be so draconian in that case, cause it only make pug-guy known. The law can be harsh against jerks too, but the main issue is that the law was too harsh, not that it was a jerk.
    Besides, AFAIK UK doesn't have a specific law against mentioning nazi symbols/stuff, like Germany and (afaik, at least partly) France. Pug-guy made a dumb joke, then became a martyr, which earned him some sympathy. Personally i don't care about him at all, yet i do care about abuse of law.
     
  5. Kyriakos

    Kyriakos Alien spiral maker

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    55,281
    Location:
    Thessalonike, The Byzantine Empire
    Without steel you won't be able to build the pizza ferry.
     
  6. Takhisis

    Takhisis is it fall yet

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    44,864
    Location:
    up yours!
    I'm almost sure that that is the real trump card the Tories are holding: threaten the EU with the ‘cuisine’ of the archipelago being allowed to flourish again.
     
    AdrienIer likes this.
  7. Kyriakos

    Kyriakos Alien spiral maker

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    55,281
    Location:
    Thessalonike, The Byzantine Empire
    :rotfl:

    British cuisine is one of the worst in the world.

     
  8. Takhisis

    Takhisis is it fall yet

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    44,864
    Location:
    up yours!
    Well, there is a historical precedent that until some point in the 18th century British cuisine was supposed to be almost comparable to that of France, but that has long been gone.

    Perhaps they started rejecting all this avec once the French became a republic for the first time and the kings at London stopped having their farcical legal claim to the crown of France? ;)
     
    Silurian likes this.
  9. Chukchi Husky

    Chukchi Husky Lone Wolf

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2004
    Messages:
    7,307
    Location:
    Carmarthenshire, Wales
    I mentioned that to someone I know and they didn't believe me. They then went on to say "Why do people come from all over the world to eat fish and chips?"
     
    Kyriakos likes this.
  10. Takhisis

    Takhisis is it fall yet

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    44,864
    Location:
    up yours!
    It's not as if frying something in batter was exactly a new invention. The Japanese were learning how to make tempura from the Portuguese three centuries before fish and chips was invented somewhere in England.
     
  11. Takhisis

    Takhisis is it fall yet

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    44,864
    Location:
    up yours!
    Of course:
    The tradition in the UK of fish battered and fried in oil may have come from Jewish immigrants from Spain and Portugal. Originally, Western Sephardic Jews settling in England as early as the 16th century would have prepared fried fish in a manner similar to pescado frito, which is coated in flour then fried in oil.[5] Charles Dickens mentions "fried fish warehouses" in Oliver Twist (1838), and in 1845 Alexis Soyer in his first edition of A Shilling cookery for the People, gives a recipe for "Fried fish, Jewish fashion", which is dipped in a batter of flour and water.​
    (notice my earlier comments about Portuguese and tempura)

    Anyway, before we make Arakhor hungry and/or annoy Kyriakos by quoting the Graundiad:


    I don't think even Rowan Atkinson could have come up with such characters.
     
  12. Hrothbern

    Hrothbern Deity

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2017
    Messages:
    5,079
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Amsterdam
    Today is Sunday.
    And Sunday is traditionally Roast Beef day in UK according to internet

    Who is actually eating today Roast Beef ?

    And who had actually this morning a "full breakfast" ?

    I had this morning just oat porridge with two boiled eggs, drinking coffee now. And this evening it will be a typical traditional Dutch meal, you never see mentioned as such on the internet (white beans, tomato sauce, leek, with some stewed pieces of pork, all mixed together, with some creme fraiche added at the last moment).
    I wonder a bit in how far UK people really eat in day-to-day life all those so very traditional British cuisine meals you see on internet and you get on the menu list of hotels in UK.


    It is an odd situation we have.
    The longer this whole drama goes on, the more likely no-Brexit becomes from a confirmatory referendum. And there are only a couple of weeks left to start the long referendum procedure to have that referendum vote before October 31.

    May and Corbyn, with Parliament on the Easter break, have their two weeks to encircle each other.
    Is that an appetiser only ?... for the next round in the Tory-Labour fight: the EU elections and the domestic backfire effect of that ? (more so in the Labour party: how maintains Corbyn his sitting on the fence position). With national elections later this year looming ?
    Is that what made May so upbeat ?
    Or is there an end to all this drama ?
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2019
  13. EnglishEdward

    EnglishEdward Deity

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,469
    Location:
    England
    Not me.

    There is nothing sacrosanct about the 22 weeks required often quoted..

    If (big IF) the conservative and labour representatives can agree the referendum question over the
    two week break, they can have the referendum vote on the same day as the Euro elections vote.
     
    Hrothbern likes this.
  14. AmazonQueen

    AmazonQueen Virago

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    3,980
    Location:
    Gingerbread Cottage
    Traditional British cuisine isn't very accommodating to vegetarians so not me, but a lot of people do have a roast every Sunday, although it is in decline.
    Pies and puddings are something we have a good variety of like Silurian said, lots of foreign inspired dishes like battered fish or kedgeree, and some interesting regional dishes.
    But there was an attitude that disliked fancy cooking, foreign muck etc. Theres a Likely Lads episode where the lads have just come back from Spain and Terry is moaning about foreign food whilst tucking into a pickled egg.
    I blame it on the war.

    http://www.victorianweb.org/history/spencer3.html
     
    Silurian and Hrothbern like this.
  15. EnglishEdward

    EnglishEdward Deity

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,469
    Location:
    England
    That is my opinion too.
     
  16. Hrothbern

    Hrothbern Deity

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2017
    Messages:
    5,079
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Amsterdam
    From that article:
    “What the change had wrought was to erase the English rural cuisine; there were now no ingredients for the soup or pottage flavoured with with greens, thickened with dried peas or beans and if they were lucky a hock bone to give added lustre and flavour” (246). The making of rich, healthy soups, a principal part of English cookery since the middle ages, generally ceased as people forgot how to make them.

    thanks :)

    Thart "rural cuisine" is also our traditional cuisine in NL, and looking at the further description of it, more or less the same.

    TIL the word pottage.
    Let's see what nice UK pottages recipes there are on internet :)
     
  17. Arakhor

    Arakhor Dremora Courtier Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Messages:
    33,042
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    UK
    Are you sure? I thought I've read somewhere that there is at least ten weeks of mandatory run-up/campaigning beforehand.
     
  18. EnglishEdward

    EnglishEdward Deity

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,469
    Location:
    England
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2000/41

    Bed time reading.

    But of course it can be amended quite quickly.
     
  19. AmazonQueen

    AmazonQueen Virago

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    3,980
    Location:
    Gingerbread Cottage
    Something I grew up eating since my dad was from Liverpool was Scouse

    https://www.bbc.com/food/recipes/scouse_84277


    But of course there was no set recipe. My mum learnt to make it from her mother-in-law and used lard instead of oil, stewing steak or minced beef instead of lamb, and served it with dumplings and pickled red cabbage.
    I still make Blind Man's Scouse (no meat), add garlic and herbs, and whichever of leeks, parsnip, turnip or swede I have.
     
  20. Hrothbern

    Hrothbern Deity

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2017
    Messages:
    5,079
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Amsterdam
    TIL Scouse :)
    From Liverpool area... seaman's food !

    Dutch for the same kind of meal is Lapskous, and in German, Norwegian, Denmark something like Lapskaus, Labskaus. AFAIK only known in the coastal areas.
    I eat that as Scouce Dutch version many times, whereby corned beef is usually mixed through it, fine or in smaller lumbs. You eat it with pickles, in the Netherlands usually with slices pickled red beets. Learned to make it from my father in law, who came from a shipping family (coasters) from the North of the Netherlands.

    I must say that "everything" in the UK regarding Parliament procedures etc, is both the same as different compared to here. Somehow I would expect that such a procedure is so well defined that politics is not able to use that "flexible" interpretation for its own interests all the time, and as part of internal party, and between parties, politics and negotiations.
    Shakespearean tradition ?
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2019
    AmazonQueen likes this.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page