Conduct Tech Name 2nd Poll

The new name of the Conduct Tech should be:

  • Conduct

    Votes: 1 6.3%
  • Codes of Conduct

    Votes: 4 25.0%
  • Social Norms

    Votes: 1 6.3%
  • Subordination

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Obedience

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Submission

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Norms

    Votes: 1 6.3%
  • Accord

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Concord

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Red Lines

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Vigilance

    Votes: 1 6.3%
  • Conformity

    Votes: 5 31.3%
  • Compliance

    Votes: 3 18.8%
  • Deference

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    16
  • Poll closed .

Thunderbrd

C2C War Dog
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
29,287
Location
Las Vegas
I guess I was taught that sarcasm is saying the opposite of what you mean, but with a tone of voice that makes it clear you intend to make the point you really mean to make that way, and irony is when the world or the events you are experiencing are being unusually significant with you in a wry manner. These definitions don't seem to match what I think of those terms at all... Almost, you could say, the opposite.

I wonder if there is a difference in the way some cultures or sub-cultural influences mean these words that perhaps some dictionaries haven't caught up with yet.
 

Maltazard

Prince
Joined
Nov 19, 2008
Messages
317
Well british humour is very different and german humor is non existant... subtle things like irony and sarcasm require a great degree of cultural and linguistical comprehension to land successfully... when I moved to Spain I could never figure out if they were serious or not, took me years, and I still think their way of expressing makes little sense (they add a lot of words in between phrases without actually meaning any of it, it's like they use words as physical gestures/fillers).
 

Maltazard

Prince
Joined
Nov 19, 2008
Messages
317
Work work work :hammers::hammers::hammers: no fun allowed, verboten - that's how we make fun of germans, anyway :lol: they make up for that by drinking way too much beer though. And racing expensive german cars on the autobahn. Ok that's enough stereotypes... or is it?
 

tmv

Emperor
Joined
Nov 24, 2015
Messages
1,556
Location
Germany
Work work work :hammers::hammers::hammers: no fun allowed, verboten - that's how we make fun of germans, anyway :lol: they make up for that by drinking way too much beer though. And racing expensive german cars on the autobahn. Ok that's enough stereotypes... or is it?
There are so many stereotypes about so many countries, but if you think we are constantly working (with about or more than 30 free days per year and very strong worker's rights), what would you think about the USA?

Or would you like me to tell you about a former currency that was actually stable (and I don't mean some 2% nonsense)?
 

Thunderbrd

C2C War Dog
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
29,287
Location
Las Vegas
There are so many stereotypes about so many countries, but if you think we are constantly working (with about or more than 30 free days per year and very strong worker's rights), what would you think about the USA?

Or would you like me to tell you about a former currency that was actually stable (and I don't mean some 2% nonsense)?
Careful. Your sense of humor isn't showing. (Not that you're wrong or anything...)
 
  • Like
Reactions: tmv

Maltazard

Prince
Joined
Nov 19, 2008
Messages
317
That's the butt of the joke: you work, and then you also work as a hobby in your spare time! To be fair having such stereotypes isn't too bad, us italians are stereotyped to be lazy, which by yearly hours worked is not true at all, especially when compared to germans, but while we spend more hours working, our productivity is much lower - nothing like that famed german efficiency.

We loved the mark because we would always devalue the lira to make up for that efficiency gap and be competitive. Now that game doesn't work anymore.
 

tmv

Emperor
Joined
Nov 24, 2015
Messages
1,556
Location
Germany
We loved the mark because we would always devalue the lira to make up for that efficiency gap and be competitive. Now that game doesn't work anymore.
About a hundred years ago (directly following from World War I) we had one of the worst hyperinflations in history, and in the end we had to remove 12 zeros (the worst hyperinflation in history was the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_pengő#Hyperinflation). Ever since then (other than during World War II) Germany has been a bit reluctant to accept high inflation rates, so the current policies of the ECB are not very popular here. Add to this that people in general invest far less here than in most other "developed" countries, and you can see that high inflation (and even 2% is high inflation compared to what we got used to) is not popular at all.
 

Maltazard

Prince
Joined
Nov 19, 2008
Messages
317
People in Italy invest even less than germans. We are known to keep money under the mattress - literally. We like to save up cash like squirrels do with walnuts. Inflation, obviously, kills the value of these savings. One of the major hindrances of our economic system is the reluctance to invest and vast amount of unused savings sitting in bank accounts. Even so, if we didn't have some inflation, we would not be able to sustain any export-oriented productive activity... it's a necessary evil for us, we've lived just fine with it until the € came. People adapted by becoming home owners instead, so no one can raise your cost of living if nothing else. On the bright side, with the lira we were all millionaires, if only semantically so. Switching to the euro had a 2000 to 1 exchange rate.

That being said, the current inflation has to do with gas prices mostly, the ECB is buying less titles now than it was buying during COVID.
By the way, Weimar was 90 years ago, when are germans going to let the past go, if ever?
 

tmv

Emperor
Joined
Nov 24, 2015
Messages
1,556
Location
Germany
By the way, Weimar was 90 years ago, when are germans going to let the past go, if ever?
The hyperinflation was 100 years ago, but we are speaking about a rally to the bottom that ended in a conversion 1,000,000,000,000 : 1. This, together with the war itself (World War I) and the Spanish Flu created a trauma that ... might have contributed to a few unwise decisions later on.

And people usually talk with their Grandparents when they are children, if they are there. All of my Grandparents were already alive when this happened. A trauma of this magnitude can easily survive that long.
 
Joined
Dec 19, 2016
Messages
122
To chime in for a bit, I think Rules of Conduct would work better. Confromity I think, is somthing humans or really anykind of social speices do. Rules don't really require any formal codifying, so it makes sense for the era.
 
Top Bottom