Confusion About Worker Turns

Spoonwood

Grand Philosopher
Joined
Apr 30, 2008
Messages
5,355
Location
Ohio
I look in the Conquests editor and see 12 turns for mine, 6 for road (these get called 'base turns' by the civilopedia). I know playing as a non-industrious tribe, it takes 6 turns and 3 turns respectively for those jobs. Under a Republic the worker rate is 2. Thus, I've guessed that the worker rate from the government halves the time of job. But, I look at forests and it says 4 turns, which matches how long it takes non-industrious tribes. Investigation suggested that clearing pollution on flatland as non-industrious takes 12 turns and 8 turns without Replaceable Parts. But clearing forests in the editor says 4 turns for clearing forests and 16 turns for clearing wetlands! And it takes 8 turns to clear a forest in anarchy.

How does the number of turns to complete a job by a single worker get calculated?
 
How does the number of turns to complete a job by a single worker get calculated?
It happens the other way around.

It takes 6 workerpoints to build a road on tiles costing 1 movement point like plains, 12 workerpoints on tiles costing 2 movement points like forest and 18 workerpoints on tiles costing 3 movement points like jungle.

In one turn one worker produces 1 workerpoint in anarchy, 4 workerpoints in fascism, 3 workerpoints in democracy and 2 workerpoints else. If your tribe is industrious multiply by 1.5. If you have researched replaceable parts multiply by 2.0. If you worker is a slave multiply by 0.5. Round down to integer. If less than 1 round up to 1.

Once a tile has collected the needed amount of workerpoints the road is completed. So 2 regular workers may take one an half turn to complete a road. Use 2 workers on turn 1 and a third worker on turn 2 and the first two workers are immediately freed up.

In PBEM special rules apply regarding when exactly workerpoints are collected.

 
EDIT: Packed redundant information into the spoiler. Those things are known anyway I think.
Spoiler :

Industrious trait cuts needed time to complete a worker job by 1/3 for natives. That means for a Republic

Job on tile with 1 movement pointnon-Industrious native worker
(pre-Replacable Parts)
Industrious native worker (pre-Replacable Parts) (2/3)
Build road3 turns2 turns
Chop forest4 turns3 turns (rounded up from 2.666)
Build railroad6 turns4 turns
Clear pollution12 turns8 turns
Clear wetlands16 turns11 turns (rounded up from 10.666)
Clear jungle24 turns16 turns

Examples of having natives and slaves mixed spares worker time:
- For doing 2 turn forest chopping under a industrious Republic, one native and one slave are enough: 8 : (3+1) = 2.
Same holds if you're in a non-industrious Democracy.
- If you're in a industrious Democracy and got Replacable parts, a Railroad is completed the same turn using only one native and one slave: 12 : (9 + 3) = 1

Replacable Parts boosts slave working speed effectively by a factor of 3. So in a Republic, building railroad on grassland pre RP needs 12 slaves to complete it the same turn, while after researching RP it only takes 4 slaves for the same task. Same goes for any other task. Not sure if this holds for Industrious civ's only ✔️.
 
Last edited:
Industrious trait cuts needed time to complete a worker job by 1/3 for natives.

If the time to complete is a multiple of 3, then the industrious trait cuts needed time to complete a worker job by 2/3. If the time to complete is not a multiple of 3, the industrious trait cuts needed time from X turns to [X * (2 / 3)] rounded up.
 
Replacable Parts boosts slave working speed effectively by a factor of 3. So in a Republic, building railroad on grassland pre RP needs 12 slaves to complete it the same turn, while after researching RP it only takes 4 slaves for the same task. Same goes for any other task.
That is only due to rounding. If your goverment type is fascism you will have no such rounding issues.

During anarchy slaves and regular workers effectively work at the same speed. Here rounding works in the opposite direction.

RP changes the picture, but by then you hopefully are not in anarchy, so you are unlikely to witness such details in regular gameplay.
 
the industrious trait cuts needed time to complete a worker job by 2/3
I guess you mean to 2/3 or by 1/3 :)
Otherwise correct. "Worst" thing that can happen if you are industrious and use 2 native workers for clearing a forest for 2 turns, when you could simply use one native and one slave for the same duration.

That is only due to rounding.
Must be. Still confusing, as it seems like the industrious trait seems to work on slaves only after one discovers RP. Pre RP slaves seem to work at the same speed for industrious and non-industrious alike. Unless you're in Fascism as you said, but I don't know about that.
 
Last edited:
I guess you mean to 2/3 or by 1/3
I think I can understand that "to 2/3" can sound more clear. But, I don't see how 1/3 will mathematically figure into a relationship between the number of non-industrious worker turns and the number of industrious worker turns.

Can you use "1/3" to convert numbers indicated by the second column of your tables into the respective numbers indicated by the third column of your tables or from the third column to the second column? I don't know how to do this, and thus I don't understand why you're talking about 1/3 here. If for example, we look at build road 3 turns to 2 turns, I understand using 2/3. Or to go from 2 turns to 3 turns we can use 3/2, since multiplication and division are inverse functions. But I don't understand using 1/3 for a relationship between the numbers in either way. We don't have a relationship where addition seems suitable, so why are you using subtraction?
 
I think I can understand that "to 2/3" can sound more clear. But, I don't see how 1/3 will mathematically figure into a relationship between the number of non-industrious worker turns and the number of industrious worker turns.

Can you use "1/3" to convert numbers indicated by the second column of your tables into the respective numbers indicated by the third column of your tables or from the third column to the second column? I don't know how to do this, and thus I don't understand why you're talking about 1/3 here. If for example, we look at build road 3 turns to 2 turns, I understand using 2/3. Or to go from 2 turns to 3 turns we can use 3/2, since multiplication and division are inverse functions. But I don't understand using 1/3 for a relationship between the numbers in either way. We don't have a relationship where addition seems suitable, so why are you using subtraction?
Ok we have the following using "#" as placeholder for amount/number:

#turns needed for a task for a industrious worker = 2/3 * #turns needed for a non-industrious worker

This comes from industrious worker speed beeing 3/2 of non-industrious worker speed (take inverse, as you pointed out). One can rewrite this to:

#turns needed for a task for a industrious worker = (1-1/3) * #turns needed for a non-industrious worker.

This holds for any task, as your formula correctly suggests. Exceptions are tasks that cannot be divided by 3, as you also clarified, for instance clearing forests or building fortresses. There rounding leads a single industrious worker to use more time for a task than he actually would need.

I could also use subtraction if I wanted to, by replacing 2/3 with (1-1/3) first, as I did above, and then multiply out to 1 * #turns needed - 1/3 * #turns needed. So reduced to 2/3 or reduced by 1/3 is in effect the same. Either I multiply with 2/3 or subtract 1/3 (from 1).

EDIT, better example: So both are expressing the same thing. It's like normally you have 1 hour from A to B with your car. Instead you have 40 minutes today. Some then say: It took me only 40 minutes today (2/3) while others say it took me 20 minutes less today, or I saved 20 minutes today (1/3). I'm translating from Swiss German so some of it might sound strange to you but I hope the meaning is clear.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom