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Conquest: New World - Los Conquistadores

Discussion in 'Civ3 - Stories & Tales' started by da3dalus, Jul 14, 2009.

  1. da3dalus

    da3dalus Warlord

    Joined:
    May 5, 2009
    Messages:
    233
    Location:
    Canada

    Prologue



    This story is taken from a game I played in a preliminary version of a mod I'm working on. It's called Conquest: New World, and has rules slightly modified to encourage expansion via the sea, and a few other changes to give European cities increased production to compensate for their tiny landmass. The mod is using TETurkhan - Test of Time (World Map 256x256) with a few changes to the terrain and some added luxuries and resources.

    I plan on releasing this mod eventually, but I may speed it up if there is enough interest. ;) This story will be released in two parts, part one being the conquest of the Aztecs and part two being the conquest of the Incas.

    Please don't hesitate to tell me what you think, I'd love to hear any feedback you might have!

    Thanks,
    da3dalus

    ~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~

    Conquest: New World


    Los Conquistadores



    Part I


    The Conquest of the Aztecs

    January 1528, La Havana Cuba
    Hernan Cortez was an ambitious Spaniard living in the newly conquered island of Cuba where he lived a comfortable life. He was an alcalde and held a rich encomienda, representing the flower of Spain in the new world.

    He was also ambitious beyond his means, and his constant attempts to enlarge his jurisdictions and personal wealth earned him the emnity of the Regidor of Cuba, Diego Velazquez de Cuellar. Like the rest of his Extremadura compatriots, Cortez was hungry for gold and not shy about obtaining it by force. After living in Cuba for many years, he began to hear tales of a fabulously wealthy empire located somewhere deep in the hinterland of the enigmatic landmass to the west across the sea.

    In January he began to put together an expedition to explore the lands to the west in search of the legendary wealth that was supposed to be there. He recieved royal assent to the enterprise from the regidor, who was all to happy to be rid of this troublesome encomendero, and hastened preparations for his expedition.


    July 1528, Eastern Shores of Mexico
    Cortez landed his small expedition on the coast at a place later called Tampico. He immediately made contact with a small tribe who told him all about a powerful empire ruled by a tribe called the Aztecs in the interior who had recently conquered them. The conquerors levied a heavy tribute in a native grain called Maize and slaves who were to be sacrificial victims to the Aztec's cruel gods. Cortez and his companions were scandalised by these tales and promised this tribe that they would liberate them from these opressors in exchange for their support and intelligence on this mysterious empire.

    Aided by these native auxiliaries and their knowledge of the land beyond the coast, Cortez sent his caravel back to Cuba to discourage mutiny and began to march North and West toward the capital of this alien empire.


    Cortez and his small army prepare to march into the heart of the Aztec empire.


    August 1528, Eastern border of the Aztec empire
    Montezuma, the emperor of the Aztecs learned of the arrival of these interlopers and the defection of a tribe of natives within days of these events. He sent scouting and raiding parties to harry Cortez' small army and discourage them from penetrating any further into the empire. The effect was quite the opposite however, as Cortez was needed only the slightest provocation to justify his mission of conquest and he promptly declared war on the Aztecs in the name of God and his king Carlos V of Spain.


    Cortez declares war on the Aztecs.

    Cortez set out immediately for the Aztec captial, Tenochtitlan, however the march was long and gruelling because his native auxiliaries were not able to travel as fast as his mounted Conquistadores, and they were encumbered by his army's baggage train and artillery pieces.


    January 1529, at the gates of Tenochtitlan
    After many months of trudging up and down valleys and peaks, they finally descended the western slope of the cordillera to the plain of Tenochtitlan. Their arrival was expected, but earlier than any of the Aztecs thought possible. The citizens of Tenochtitlan scrambled to bring food, livestock and people into the city and destroy the causeways leading to the lake city. However they were not fast enough. Cortez' horsemen charged across the plain and onto the principle causeway. They lanced any warriors brave enough to stand up to the Spanish charge and then hacked their way to the city proper where they secured the gate, allowing their native auxiliaries to enter the city. Cortez and his conquistadores rushed through the central squares of the city to where the emperor Montezuma was. The whole scene devolved into a massacre, with the Spaniards and their allies left firmly in control of the capital city of the Aztec empire. Cortez seized the Aztec emperor for himself, to rule as a proxy through him.


    Cortez at the gates of Tenochtitlan.


    Cortez captures the Aztec capitol.

    Cortez spent the next year putting down resistance by the natives through a combination of shrewd diplomacy with tributary tribes, direct orders from Montezuma to his people and force. By the following January they had stamped out all native resistance in Mexico except the last stronghold of Tlatelolco.


    Cortez at the gates of Tlatelolco.

    Cortez and his Conquistadores used their mounts to great advantage again and charged into the midst of the city's defenders, hacking and killing innumerable natives until they realized the battle was lost and fled into the hills. He left his native auxiliaries to kill the survivors and plunder the town. Finally, having captured the last Aztec city, he had Montezuma killed and ignominiously buried in an anonymous grave.


    Cortez completes the conquest of the Aztec empire.

    With this last act, the mighty Aztec empire was brought into the domain of the Kings of Spain in less than one year, with all of its wealth systematically stripped from the countryside and shipped back to Spain, all of its people enslaved under the encomenderos and confined to their repartimientos.


    ~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~~*~


    Here is a screenshot of Europe around the time of the Conquest of the Aztecs:

     
  2. Land_Shark93

    Land_Shark93 Chieftain

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Ready for ROP RAPE
    looks cool
     
  3. Dumanios

    Dumanios MLG

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2008
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    4,874
    What mod is this?
     
  4. da3dalus

    da3dalus Warlord

    Joined:
    May 5, 2009
    Messages:
    233
    Location:
    Canada
    It's something I'm working on at the moment. It's based off of TETurkhan - Test of Time (World Map 256x256), with some added resources and a few added units as well. I'm planning it to span from the late 15th century until the late 19th century so you can play through the entire colonial era.

    There are eight advanced civilizations at the start (Historical European colonial powers): Spain, Portugal, England, France, Scandinavia, Germany and the Papal States. There is a "Mother Country" resource that gives a production bonus to cities in the homeland to compensate for the smaller land area in Europe relative to the other civs.

    I have also taken a page out of timerover51's MOD and reduced corruption drastically. Harbours decrease corruption also since they can link the colony to the mother country in order to encourage European expansion abroad.

    I have also added some new strategic resources and luxuries, scattering them around the world except Europe to further encourage expansion. New resources and luxes are: Pearls, Silver Vein, Gold Vein, Hemp, Indian Slaves, African Slaves.

    The focus on this MOD will most likely be on naval power (after all the navy was always the backbone of colonialism) and I have already added some extra naval units: Fluyt, Sloop, East Indiaman, Ship-of-the-Line, Dhow. I may add some more yet. :)

    I'm still ironing out the details, however I hope to have a working alpha version soon. I will be posting Part II to this story in the next few days also. :D
     
  5. da3dalus

    da3dalus Warlord

    Joined:
    May 5, 2009
    Messages:
    233
    Location:
    Canada

    Conquest: New World


    Los Conquistadores



    Part II


    The Conquest of the Incas

    January 1543, Island of Punà, west of the Ecuadoran coast.
    Francisco Pizarro scanned the horizon with excitement, looking for a little white blob that should be floating to the north east. A lookout had spotted sails on the horizon and called out to the commander of the Spanish expedition of Conquistadores. These men were hardened fighters, some of them even veterans of the recent campaign to conquer the Aztec lands. Most however were newcomers from Spain, eager to find their own fabulous fortunes in some exotic kingdom. The fathers and grandfathers of these recent arrivals were the men who famously completed la reconquista only a generation before, men from la Extremadura, like Pizarro himself. These were men who were used to fighting heathens with the self assurance that God was on their side, however this time their motivation was greed.

    Pizarro suddenly sighted sails in his telescope. The ship was still very far in the distance because he could not even see the hull of the ship yet, but there could be no doubt what ship it was. It was a vessel sent from his partners in Panamà city carrying something very precious, something he had been waiting for for months on this island: A Royal Capitulación from the Queen granting him permission to invade the Kingdom of Perù.

    He snapped the telescope shut with excitement and issued the order to prepare to embark. He felt his anticipation and excitement being fanned by the greed of legendary treasures of gold and silver and a native kingdom ripe for the picking. He smiled as he fancied the rewards in store for him. A count, a duke? Maybe even a Marquis? He mused over this idea as he retired to his quarters to await the beginning of the enterprise that would earn his family a noble name in Spain.


    Pizarro waiting to embark on the island of Punà.

    July 1543, the Coast of Perù
    After marching south for several weeks, Pizarro and his colum of 200 horsemen and 100 arquebusiers finally made it to the north west corner of the Inca Empire. When they crested a certain hill one day, they saw the ruins of a native village that had only recently been devastated. They asked some natives hanging around nearby what had happened, and they explained that the whole empire was embroiled in a civil war between two sons of the late Inca Huayna-Capac. For months these two heirs to the throne fought a bitter war that devastated the countryside and in the end the younger of the two, Atahualpa captured his brother and had him executed. Pizarro questioned them further about this Atahualpa usurper and they told him that he was now Inca or emperor of all the lands to the south of this location and that he was actually not very far from their present location. The Inca was on the road to Cuzco.

    At the name of this city the Spaniards became very excited and they turned inland to take the road to Cuzco. The native tribes to the north had told Pizarro tales about the fabulous wealth of the city of Cuzco, captial of the Incas. They described the plates of solid gold fixed to the side of the monumental temple of the Sun, and the solid silver plates on the corresponding temple of the Moon. There were supposed to be fountains made of solid gold, and it was so common that the sheppherds (llamaherds?) in the hills wore it as jewelry.

    Atahualpa, meanwhile was not unaware of the Spaniards' prescence. He had scouts following their every move down the coast, and a runner had just arrived at his camp informing him that this group of bearded men had turned inland towards Cuzco. Atahualpa gave the order to prepare his litter. He had a plan to use these men to his advantage supressing the more restive tribes and keeping his brothers in check.

    Pizarro's scouts returned to the column several days into the march inland to inform him that they had located the Inca's army just a short ride down the road. His excitement was tempered slightly by their estimates of the native host at as many as 50 000 warriors. He was tempted to dismiss such extravagant figures out of hand, such a number was almost unheard of in European wars, however similar reports during Cortez's conquest turned out to be true. He prudently ordered a halt and had his men occupy an empty building not far from the road, preparing to meet the new King of this land.

    When Atahualpa approached the building, he halted his advancing army a few bowshots distance from the building where the Spaniards were waiting and ordered some ambassadors to parlay with Pizarro's men. When they arrived in the building, Atahualpa's embassy was translated to the Spaniards through their native interpreters proposing that Atahualpa would meet their leader here this evening. Both leaders were to be unarmed and accompanied only by a few dozen of their personal retainers. Pizarro gladly acquiesced and sent the native delegation on their way. He was elated at the prospect of meeting Atahualpa unarmed in a location of his choosing, and once the last native left the courtyard of the sturdy stone building they were occupying he quickly set about preparing to meet the native King.

    That evening Atahualpa made his slow advance to towards the Spaniards accompanied by fifty Yanaconas, all fully decked out in their ceremonial garb which included multi-coloured checked tunics made of cotton, a ceremonial headdress made of llama wool and brightly coloured feathers, and to the Spaniards' great pleasure each Yanacona was wearing a large golden medallion from their neck that measured one-and-a-half hands wide and one thumb thick. As the magnificent procession neared the courtyard each Spaniard tensed in anticipation, quietly gripping the familiar hilt of their swords with nervous energy. The courtyard where Pizarro waited with 25 unarmed footmen was surrounded on three sides by walls that were broken by 150 arched doorways. These doorways were large enough to accomodate a man and his mount and were dark enough to conceal their prescence from those in the courtyard in the low light of dusk. Pizarro had stationed a mounted Spaniard in each archway and ordered them to await the signal, at which point they would charge the unarmed and surprised Inca delegation with specific orders to take Atahualpa unharmed just like Cortez did the unfortunate Montezuma.
     
  6. kingfire87

    kingfire87 Warlord

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    It all depends on which Civ I am.
    Wow. This is pretty cool. A very interesting mod too. I applaud heartily.:clap:
    *Subscription*
     

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