Danmacsch's (Damasc's) civilizations

Discussion in 'Civ5 - New Civilizations' started by Danmacsch, Jul 31, 2014.

  1. Uighur_Caesar

    Uighur_Caesar Comandante en Jefe

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    Struensee's story is legitimately one of the most interesting historical things I've seen. Thanks so much for making this awesome mod and introducing me to the Danish version of Rasputin!
     
  2. Tarmont

    Tarmont Empress

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    I love the Bornholm dragon but why must the scheme contrast be so low. ;_;

    Edit: Also methinks the production boost should be nerfed in the early game to at least never be higher than the cost of the policy; I got 74 production by turn 6!

    Oh, it does not scale over time at all? Is this intended?
     
  3. Nite

    Nite Chieftain

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    I'm looking through the Screenshot Album for Struensee, what does MCIS stand for?

    Edit: Nvm, after a brief search i found the mod that was referenced
     
  4. Danmacsch

    Danmacsch Geheimekabinetsminister

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    Thank you for saying so :).
    It should scale - it utilizes JFD's "GetEraAdjustedValue" function, but is also dependent on the population of the capital. Regardless, I'll look into adjusting it :).
    Yes, it is simply a way to show some extra info - in the City Screen you'll see an icon of the UB to the right of the Yields Overview. When hovering over it with the mouse it displays the amount of Culture the UB generates from Specialists. The icon is only there, if the City in question actually has the UB built.
     
  5. TranquilSilence

    TranquilSilence Grumpy Snufkin

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    Thanks for the Denmark release and update, out of interest though - it seems as if Struensee's UB isn't providing the negative crime that a constabulary replacement should be with CiD installed (or at least EUI isn't showing me the normal -10% Crime), I presume that this is unintended?
     
  6. Danmacsch

    Danmacsch Geheimekabinetsminister

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    It'´s unintended - I actually didn't think of it. Shouldn't the Crime yield (negative as positive) be there automatically as long as the UB is the same BuildingClass as the constabulary? I'll look into it right away :).
     
  7. Kerfuffle

    Kerfuffle King of the Whale Sharks

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    Glad to see Struensee released, congrats! :D
     
  8. Danmacsch

    Danmacsch Geheimekabinetsminister

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    Struensee updated:
    • Fixed issue with UB not providing double Culture during Golden Ages.
    • Nerfed the amount of Production granted when adopting a Social Policy (scaled by era and not population of Capital),
    • Fix an issue with Cultural Diversity mod support.
    • Fix an issue with Enlightenment Era mod support, where the UU Espingol didn't upgrade correctly.
    • Further slightly lowered the Defense of the UU Espingol.
    • Tweaked some of the leader flavors.

    Thanks - have to keep releasing mods when you provide such awesome maps, man :)!
     
  9. napstad

    napstad Chieftain

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    Glad to see the release :)
     
  10. Danmacsch

    Danmacsch Geheimekabinetsminister

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    Well I hope it won't disappoint. The last few comments on Steam seem to indicate that Struensee wasn't king, that Denmark-Norway wasn't really a kingdom and that the whole notion of a Struensee led Denmark is just rubbish!

    *... oh well ... :p*
     
  11. JFD

    JFD Kathigitarkh

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    Well, Denmark-Norway wasn't a Kingdom, but it was a kingdom. You're capitalizing the title in the infographic, not stating that Denmark-Norway was itself a unitary Kingdom. :p
     
  12. Hoop Thrower

    Hoop Thrower Cyberbolivarian Inkarri

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    Funny how, if they had bothered checking the first screenshot, they would have realized you were aware of all those points. Or maybe they did and complained anyways because that's sort of a sport on Steam comments.

    Also curious that no one has ever complained about Araucania & Patagonia despite it never... having been quite a thing really. Guess that's due to only me and like 3 other people ever caring about it ever having existed. :p
     
  13. Scapegrace

    Scapegrace Obvious Spambot

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    You're also about the only people who can be relied upon to spell it.

    Not that this generally stops Steam commenters. =]
     
  14. Guandao

    Guandao Rajah of Minyue and Langkasuka

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    Danmacsch, do you still require civpedia entries for Idris Alooma, Kanem-Bornu?
     
  15. Danmacsch

    Danmacsch Geheimekabinetsminister

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    YES :D I do!
     
  16. Guandao

    Guandao Rajah of Minyue and Langkasuka

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    Having trouble finding info on the Kanem Bornu unique unit, the Askawr. Is the name spelled correctly?
     
  17. Guandao

    Guandao Rajah of Minyue and Langkasuka

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    Here is the Kanem-Bornu pedia entry
    Spoiler :

    Kanem-Bornu
    History

    The Kanem-Bornu Empire was an empire that existed in what is now modern day Chad and Nigeria. It was known to Arab geographers as the Kanem Empire from the 9th century AD onwards and lasted as the independent kingdom of Bornu until 1900. The history of the empire is mainly known from the Royal Chronicle or Girgam discovered in 1851 by the German traveler Heinrich Barth.
    Geography and Climate
    At its height, the Kanem-Bornu Empire encompassed an area covering not only much of Chad, but also parts of modern southern Libya, eastern Niger, northeastern Nigeria and northern Cameroon. It was located at the southern end of the trans-Saharan trade route between Tripoli and the region of Lake Chad. It is a hot, arid region with several oases, the largest being Lake Chad.
    Origins of Kanem-Bornu: Shrouded in the Past
    The origins of the Kanem Empire are very unclear. Until today, historiographical debates oppose the followers of a foundation of Kanem-Bornu by populations from the ancient Near East and followers of a more local development. Some researches try to connect the creation of Kanem-Bornu with exodus from the collapsed Assyrian Empire c. 600 BC to the northeast of Lake Chad. The intensity of scholar discussions around this theory proves that the question hasn't been solved yet, and we must be very cautious concerning early formation of Kanem-Bornu. According to a more accepted theory, the empire of Kanem began forming around 700 AD under the nomadic Tebu-speaking Kanembu. The Kanembu were supposedly forced southwest towards the fertile lands around Lake Chad by political pressure and desiccation in their former range. The area already possessed independent, walled city-states belonging to the Sao culture. Under the leadership of the Duguwa dynasty, the Kanembu would eventually dominate the Sao, but not before adopting many of their customs.
    Rise of the Sayfawa Dynasty
    The major factor that influenced the later history of the state of Kanem was the early penetration of Islam. North African traders, Berbers and Arabs, brought the new religion. Towards 1068, Hummay, a member of the Sayfawa establishment, who was already a Muslim, deposed the last Duguwa King, Selma, from power and thus established the new dynasty of the Sayfawa. Islam offered the Sayfawa rulers the advantage of new ideas from Arabia and the Mediterranean world, as well as literacy in administration. But many people resisted the new religion favouring traditional beliefs and practices. When Hummay had assumed power on the basis of his strong Islamic following, for example, it is believed that the Duguwa/Kanembu began some kind of internal opposition. This pattern of conflict and compromise with Islam occurs repeatedly in Chadian history. When the ruling dynasty changed, the royal establishment abandoned its capital of Manan and settled in the new capital Njimi further south of Kanem. By the 13th century, Kanem's rule expanded. At the same time, the Kanembu people drew closer to the new rulers and increased the growing population in the new capital of Njimi. Even though the Kanembu became the main power-base of the Sayfuwa, Kanem's rulers continued to travel frequently throughout the kingdom and especially towards Bornu, west of lake Chad. Herders and farmers alike recognized the government's power and acknowledged their allegiance by paying tribute.
    Mai Dunama Dabbalemi
    Kanem's expansion peaked during the long and energetic reign of Mai Dunama Dabbalemi (ca. 1203–1242), also of the Sayfawa dynasty. Dabbalemi initiated diplomatic exchanges with sultans in North Africa and apparently arranged for the establishment of a special hostel in Cairo to facilitate pilgrimages to Mecca. During his reign, he declared jihad against the surrounding tribes and initiated an extended period of conquest. After consolidating their territory around Lake Chad, the Fezzan region (in present-day Libya) fell under Kanem's authority, and the empire's influence extended westward to Kano (in present-day Nigeria) and thus included Bornu, eastward to Ouaddaï, and southward to the Adamawa grasslands (in present-day Cameroon). Portraying these boundaries on maps can be misleading, however, because the degree of control extended in ever-weakening gradations from the core of the empire around Njimi to remote peripheries, from which allegiance and tribute were usually only symbolic. Moreover, cartographic lines are static and misrepresent the mobility inherent in nomadism and migration, which were common. The loyalty of peoples and their leaders was more important in governance than the physical control of territory. Dabbalemi devised a system to reward military commanders with authority over the people they conquered. This system, however, tempted military officers to pass their positions to their sons, thus transforming the office from one based on achievement and loyalty to the mai into one based on hereditary nobility. Dabbalemi was able to suppress this tendency, but after his death, dissension among his sons weakened the Sayfawa Dynasty. Dynastic feuds degenerated into civil war, and Kanem's outlying peoples soon ceased paying tribute.
    Shifting of Court from Kanem to Bornu
    By the end of the 14th century, internal struggles and external attacks had torn Kanem apart. Between 1359 and 1383, seven mais reigned, but Bulala invaders (from the area around Lake Fitri to the east) killed five of them. This proliferation of mais resulted in numerous claimants to the throne and led to a series of internecine wars. Finally, around 1380 the Bulala forced Mai Umar Idrismi to abandon Njimi and move the Kanembu people to Bornu on the western edge of Lake Chad. Over time, the intermarriage of the Kanembu and Bornu peoples created a new people and language, the Kanuri. But even in Bornu, the Sayfawa Dynasty's troubles persisted. During the first three-quarters of the 15th century, for example, fifteen mais occupied the throne. Then, around 1460, Mai Ali Dunamami defeated his rivals and began the consolidation of Bornu. He built a fortified capital at Ngazargamu, to the west of Lake Chad (in present-day Niger), the first permanent home a Sayfawa mai had enjoyed in a century. So successful was the Sayfawa rejuvenation that by the early 16th century Mai Idris Katakarmabe (1487–1509) was able to defeat the Bulala and retake Njimi, the former capital. The empire's leaders, however, remained at Ngazargamu because its lands were more productive agriculturally and better suited to the raising of cattle.
    Idris Alauma’s Reign
    Kanem-Bornu peaked during the reign of the outstanding statesman Mai Idris Alauma (c. 1564–1596). Alauma is remembered for his military skills, administrative reforms, and Islamic piety. His main adversaries were the Hausa to the west, the Tuareg and Toubou to the north, and the Bulala to the east. One epic poem extols his victories in 330 wars and more than 1,000 battles. His innovations included the employment of fixed military camps (with walls); permanent sieges and "scorched earth" tactics, where soldiers burned everything in their path; armored horses and riders; and the use of Berber camelry, Kotoko boatmen, and iron-helmeted musketeers trained by Turkish military advisers. His active diplomacy featured relations with Tripoli, Egypt, and the Ottoman Empire, which sent a 200-member ambassadorial party across the desert to Alauma's court at Ngazargamu. Alauma also signed what was probably the first written treaty or cease-fire in Chadian history. Alauma introduced a number of legal and administrative reforms based on his religious beliefs and Islamic law (sharia). He sponsored the construction of numerous mosques and made a pilgrimage to Mecca, where he arranged for the establishment of a hostel to be used by pilgrims from his empire. As with other dynamic politicians, Alauma's reformist goals led him to seek loyal and competent advisers and allies, and he frequently relied on slaves who had been educated in noble homes. Alauma regularly sought advice from a council composed of heads of the most important clans. He required major political figures to live at the court, and he reinforced political alliances through appropriate marriages (Alauma himself was the son of a Kanuri father and a Bulala mother). Kanem-Bornu under Aluma was strong and wealthy. Government revenue came from tribute (or booty, if the recalcitrant people had to be conquered), sales of slaves, and duties on and participation in trans-Saharan trade. Unlike West Africa, the Chadian region did not have gold. Still, it was central to one of the most convenient trans-Saharan routes. Between Lake Chad and Fezzan lay a sequence of well-spaced wells and oases, and from Fezzan there were easy connections to North Africa and the Mediterranean Sea. Many products were sent north, including natron (sodium carbonate), cotton, kola nuts, ivory, ostrich feathers, perfume, wax, and hides, but the most important of all were slaves. Imports included salt, horses, silks, glass, muskets, and copper. Alauma took a keen interest in trade and other economic matters. He is credited with having the roads cleared, designing better boats for Lake Chad, introducing standard units of measure for grain, and moving farmers into new lands. In addition, he improved the ease and security of transit through the empire with the goal of making it so safe that "a lone woman clad in gold might walk with none to fear but God."
    Decline of the Bornu Empire
    The administrative reforms and military brilliance of Alauma sustained the empire until the mid-17th century, when its power began to fade. By the late 18th century, Bornu rule extended only westward, into the land of the Hausa. Around that time, Fulani people, invading from the west, were able to make major inroads into Bornu. By the early 19th century, Kanem-Bornu was clearly an empire in decline, and in 1808 Fulani warriors conquered Ngazargamu. Usman dan Fodio led the Fulani thrust and proclaimed a jihad (holy war) on the irreligious Muslims of the area. His campaign eventually affected Kanem-Bornu and inspired a trend toward Islamic orthodoxy. But Muhammad al-Amin al-Kanemi contested the Fulani advance. Kanem was a Muslim scholar and non-Sayfawa warlord who had put together an alliance of Shuwa Arabs, Kanembu, and other seminomadic peoples. He eventually built in 1814 a capital at Kukawa (in present-day Nigeria). Sayfawa mais remained titular monarchs until 1846. In that year, the last mai, in league with Ouaddai tribesmen, precipitated a civil war. It was at that point that Kanem's son, Umar, became king, thus ending one of the longest dynastic reigns in regional history. Although the dynasty ended, the kingdom of Kanem-Bornu survived. But Umar, who eschewed the title mai for the simpler designation shehu (from the Arabic shaykh), could not match his father's vitality and gradually allowed the kingdom to be ruled by advisers (wazirs). Bornu began to decline, as a result of administrative disorganization, regional particularism, and attacks by the militant Ouaddai Empire to the east. The decline continued under Umar's sons, and in 1893 Rabih az-Zubayr, leading an invading army from eastern Sudan, conquered Bornu. He was defeated by French soldiers in 1900. The state was absorbed by the British ruled entity which eventually became known as Nigeria. From that point on, a remnant of the old kingdom was (and still is) allowed to continue to exist in subjection to the various Governments of the country as the Borno Emirate.


    Idris Alauma's entry
    Spoiler :

    Idris Alauma
    History

    Idris Alauma was the greatest mai or king of the Bornu Empire, ruling from c. 1564 to 1596. Under his rule, Kanem-Bornu reached the zenith of its power. He is remembered for his military skills, administrative reforms, and Islamic piety. His feats are mainly known through his chronicler Ahmad bin Fartuwa.
    Military and Diplomacy
    A lot about Idris Alauma’s early life is unknown. His father was an ethnic Kanuri, while his mother was a Bulala. His main adversaries were the Hausa to the west, the Tuareg and Tubu to the north, and the Bulala to the east. His innovations included the employment of fixed military camps (with walls); permanent sieges and "scorched earth" tactics, where soldiers burned everything in their path; armored horses and riders; and the use of Berber camelry, Kotoko boatmen, and iron-helmeted musketeers trained by Turkish military advisers. His active diplomacy featured relations with Tripoli, Egypt, and the Ottoman Empire, which sent a 200-member ambassadorial party across the desert to Alauma's court at Ngazargamu. Alauma also signed what was probably the first written treaty or cease-fire in Chadian history.
    Legal Reforms
    Alauma introduced a number of legal and administrative reforms based on his religious beliefs and Islamic law (sharia). He sponsored the construction of numerous mosques and made a pilgrimage (hajj) to Mecca, where he arranged for the establishment of a hostel to be used by pilgrims from his empire. As with other dynamic politicians, Alauma's reformist goals led him to seek loyal and competent advisers and allies, and he frequently relied on slaves who had been educated in noble homes. Alauma regularly sought advice from a council composed of heads of the most important clans. He required major political figures to live at the court, and he reinforced political alliances through appropriate marriages.
    Trade
    Kanem-Bornu under Alauma was strong and wealthy. Government revenue came from tribute (or booty, if the recalcitrant people had to be conquered), sales of slaves, and duties on and participation in trans-Saharan trade. Unlike West Africa, the Chadian region did not have gold. Still, it was central to one of the most convenient trans-Saharan routes. Between Lake Chad and Fezzan lay a sequence of well-spaced wells and oases, and from Fezzan there were easy connections to North Africa and the Mediterranean Sea. Many products were sent north, including natron (sodium carbonate), cotton, kola nuts, ivory, ostrich feathers, perfume, wax, and hides, but the most important of all were slaves. Imports included salt, horses, silks, glass, muskets, and copper. Alauma took a keen interest in trade and other economic matters. He is credited with having the roads cleared, designing better boats for Lake Chad, introducing standard units of measure for grain, and moving farmers into new lands. In addition, he improved the ease and security of transit through the empire with the goal of making it so safe that "a lone woman clad in gold might walk with none to fear but God."
    Judgment of History
    None much is known about the specifics of Idris Alauma’s life, but his reign is remembered as being the height of Kanem-Bornu power. He was a capable administrator and a pious Muslim. The kings that followed him were not as memorable.


    Wasiliram entry

    Spoiler :
    Wasiliram
    In the Kanem-Bornu capital and other major centres, the Wasili (North African traders), were recognized as guests of the government. A wasiliram (special quarter) was assigned to them and a Zanna Arjinama (titled official) looked after their affairs. In the markets, the Mala Kasuube supervised sales and attempted to ensure justice and fair play during major commercial transactions. Each profession or craft had its own head nominated by its members and recognized by the government. These helped the Mala Kasuube in the administration of the market and in the collection of revenue.
     
  18. Danmacsch

    Danmacsch Geheimekabinetsminister

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    Thank you so much - these are great! About the unique unit, idk if it should be spelled differently - it's something Scapegrace came up with, so maybe she can chime in? Another unit name we had up was Asakir. On that I've been able to find this, which I just translated with Google's "Translate this page" tool. Might be a start, but if it proves too vague, I'll see if I can find some other reference.
     
  19. Danmacsch

    Danmacsch Geheimekabinetsminister

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    @Hoop, I accidentally deleted the links you sent me with suggestions for music for Kanem-Bornu - if you still have them or is able to find them again, could you re-send them to me?
    Progress it's being made btw; decisions are coded and working and events are in the making, so it looks like either Kanem-Bornu or the Faroe Islands are next in line to be released :D!

    Another thing, if anyone has had a chance to play with Struensee yet, are the UA production bonuses and/or the UU OP? I had a game on Emperor against him yesterday and he turtled pretty much until the Renaissance and then went crazy taking out all immediate neighbours AND got tons of Wonders. And by that time he had finished an entire policy tree more than me. So idk?.
     
  20. tmxk2012917

    tmxk2012917 Prince

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    I played as him a few days ago. I think his UA is not so OP given that only 49 productions for a wonder are gotten when I adopted a society in classical era. Not sure whether the UU is OP since I ended the game before Renaissance, but his UU looks powerful.. 3 attacks per turn.
     

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