District Questions

rover6695

Prince
Joined
Aug 5, 2014
Messages
437
So just want to clear up some things on adjacency.

1) You get a +1 to any district if it is adjacent to ANY other district?
-If I place 'campus' next to 'commercial hub', the campus gets a +1 science and the com hub gets a +1 gold?
-Does this apply to all districts, like if I place a campus next to an encampment, do I still get a bonus for the campus?
-Is this a 1 time thing, or if I place a district next to 2/3/4 districts, I get a +2/3/4 of that unit to each of those districts?
-If the districts are for different cities, do I still get the bonus?
-If the districts are owned by another civ, do and my opponent still get the bonus?

2) Generally, should one place districts as soon as possible to lock in the price, or is it better to wait, use the current tile to farm until ready to build?

3) Is it inevitable that over the course of the game one will have several tiles they improved get knocked down for districts? I kind of try to avoid it but it is hard.
 

Ziad

Emperor
Joined
Nov 11, 2013
Messages
1,896
Location
Lebanon
Normally, districts receive +1 to its yields for every two adjacent districts. City Center counts as a district. A district does not have to have adjacency bonuses itself to contribute (such as Encampments or Aqueducts)

Every district has additional adjacency bonuses based on nearby terrain or features that are counted on top of district adjacency bonuses. For example, a Commercial Hub next to a Government Plaza and City Center receives +1 adjacency bonus from the Plaza (Government Plaza adjacency) and +1 adjacency from the Plaza and City Center (district adjacency).

Some civilizations get unique bonuses that amplify these effects.

Territory ownership is irrelevant to the calculations.

It is generally better to place districts as soon as possible. I find that exploiting this is generally irrelevant to the greater scheme of things if you aren't minmaxing

It is very normal to replace terrain tiles with districts as the game progresses. In general you should try to avoid replacing strong tiles as much as possible. Just be mindful of opportunity cost, as anything else. Don't go removing a +8 food tile when your city is near starvation.
 

NukeAJS

King
Joined
Jul 28, 2008
Messages
850
You get +0.5 when adjacent to any other district except the government district -- which always gives a full +1. Some civs give a full +1 bonus when next to any district (Japan) or when next to certain other districts like Poland's holy sites.

I'm 90% sure that a +0.5 bonus doesn't actually give any yield, you have to hit the +1, +2 etc threshold to get a benefit. So, in your example, simply putting two districts next to each other won't give any benefit. You'd have to put three districts next to each other for all of them to get a +1 bonus.

All districts give adjacency bonuses including aquaducts, dams, encampments, canals, and city centers.

Placing districts next to each other after their initial placement will update their yields. So, if you make a diamond of districts, all yields in all districts would be +2 after the fourth district completed. However, if a district gets +3 AFTER being placed, you will not get the era score bonus. You can only get era score bonus immediately after a district is completed (might even be placed ... not sure but it's definitely not after being completed, ever).

Your cities that own the districts doesn't matter. Bonus still applies. But I'm pretty sure rival civs don't count though.

Placing districts ASAP is usually better than working the tile. However, you gotta play it by ear. If it's a +3 food farm -- drop the district. If it's a +4 food +4 production tile next to that wonder that gives double yields -- probably better to hold off (the +4 production will help you clear your queue much faster)

You should try to place districts on unimproved tiles whenever possible and it's usually not too hard because you wouldn't really want to replace high yield tiles anyways. This really comes down to decisions you make with your builders than anything else. If you're improving feature-less plains tile to farms -- you'll probably replace them later with districts. But the bigger question would be why are you using your builder charges on making a +1/+1 tile a +2/+1 tile?
 

Sostratus

Deity
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
2,373
Location
Minnesota, USA
2) Generally, should one place districts as soon as possible to lock in the price, or is it better to wait, use the current tile to farm until ready to build?
Often it is useful to have a loose idea where the first few districts in a new city should go ahead of time, since good district spots are one of the prime reasons to found cities.
For example, Perhaps you see a nice coastal spot with some fish and the mouth of a river; so you want to settle on the river mouth, place the harbor next to the city, and complete the triangle with a Commercial hub next to both, and also on the river. (This is an easy way to generate a lot of gold since the harbor+commercial hub will output a minimum of 3 and 5 gold respectively.) Perhaps you also see a good location for a campus. So with those "good spots" in mind, you mentally know what to avoid improving from the get go. Just above the minimap, there are built in map tacks/ pins, and you can place district icons down. This is extremely helpful, especially if you later want to place a canal or dam, so you know not to obstruct the tile with another district! i use the tacks a lot for district planning, because I enjoy making big clusters of districts. You can see the links in my signature for an idea. If you are new to the game I do recommend skimming the Industrial Zone one, if you're into that thing.

The only reason to hold off on placing a district for cost locking is if it would be better to wait a couple turns for a builder to chop the feature on that tile, if there is one.

3) Is it inevitable that over the course of the game one will have several tiles they improved get knocked down for districts? I kind of try to avoid it but it is hard.
As ziad said, this is very normal and often a good sign that you are developing!
There's 2 ways to approach this.
1. If you have mostly empty terrain to work with, you should ideally not be improving tiles that will later hold districts except in a few cases*. That way there's not too much overlap at all, so the strong tiles won't have be where you put districts anyways. Sometimes, like on fertile floodplains that have been flooded a few times, you have to sacrifice some good tiles for good district spots. This is usually okay, since overall there's many other tiles that can pick up the food slack.

*these cases would be things like completing a triangle of farms for the feudalism bonus, as the extra growth helps you unlock more districts; or if there's a bonus resource on the tile - if the district isn't coming for a while (IZ, dam, canal, etc) it may be worth improving for a while. For example, a cow pasture within range of the temple of artemis. Or perhaps improving a deer with a camp to build the Temple in the first place, and much later replacing it with a theater square or something.

2. Opportunity cost as Ziad mentioned. Districts have adjacency, but also hold buildings. Often this is much more important than even the adjacency. A late game district that almost no one plans for is the Aerodrome. Not only is possessing an airforce really handy (air units, especially bombers, are exceptionally strong) but the buildings give you production; a hangar +2:c5production:, and airport +6:c5production: if powered. So this one tile would give 8:c5production: production; that is almost always better than any flat tile.
Keep in mind that once you hit Replaceable parts, your farm tiles can start pushing 6-8:c5food: food, so if every city keeps a little cluster of land open for some farms, you will have more than enough food for even a big city. This is intentionally part of the game to allow you to replace some farms with districts. Players generally value production more than food because it's so easy to get food late game.
 

Troy Bruckner

Prince
Joined
Jan 26, 2019
Messages
433
I only skimmed other posts so I am not sure if somebody else covered this, but the .5 doesn't round up or add to another .5 unless it is the same type so the .5 from a forest doesn't combine the .5 of a rain forest.
 

rover6695

Prince
Joined
Aug 5, 2014
Messages
437
Thanks. So it doesn’t matter if the adjacent district is owned by another city or Civ, I still get the bonus as do all cities and cubs?
 

RealHuhn

Emperor
Joined
Aug 31, 2009
Messages
1,173
Location
Germany
2) Generally, should one place districts as soon as possible to lock in the price, or is it better to wait, use the current tile to farm until ready to build?
In some cases, especially in the early game, it is actually not advisable to immediately lock the price of a district because if you wait and build enough other types of districts first, you begin to get a -50% production discount.
If you want to know more about this district discount mechanism check the link in my signature.
 

rover6695

Prince
Joined
Aug 5, 2014
Messages
437
In some cases, especially in the early game, it is actually not advisable to immediately lock the price of a district because if you wait and build enough other types of districts first, you begin to get a -50% production discount.
If you want to know more about this district discount mechanism check the link in my signature.
Why would you get a discount?
 

qadams

Bohemian
Joined
Jan 2, 2014
Messages
707
Location
Ruritania
Often it is useful to have a loose idea where the first few districts in a new city should go ahead of time, since good district spots are one of the prime reasons to found cities.
Yes, definitely, and with the improved Map Tacks (from the April 2019 update), it's much easier to plan out in advance where you'd like to place districts, improvements, or wonders.
 
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