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Dutch History (an RFC narrative)

Discussion in 'Civ4 - Rhye's and Fall of Civilization' started by Bob III, Oct 19, 2007.

  1. Bob III

    Bob III Lazy Roamer

    Joined:
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    The Dutch Revolution
    The year was 915. Christianity was in full force, being the state religion of all Europe. The people in northern France were on the edge of a full-scale revolution. If it weren’t for the popularity of Louis XIV, this ship would have sunk long ago. The entirety of northern France was farmland, occupied by poor peasant farmers. Its people were upset with their poverty and ill treatment by the French government. A revolutionary leader emerged, and his name was Joseph of Amsterdam, Amsterdam being the largest city in northern France. He led his people to believe there would be something better on the other side of the bridge, a new hope of survival and wealth. Joseph united the people of northern France to a new cultural identity, the Dutch identity. In 918 Joseph sent a messenger to Paris, the French capital, saying that the Dutch people had created a new Kingdom under the rule of Joseph I. Louis XIV did not take the news lying down. He sent a brigade of 100 longbowmen and 150 macemen to squelch the revolt. Joseph was ready. By 919 the Dutch Revolution was in full swing. Louis’ troops approached the adequately barricaded Dutch city of Amsterdam to find 120 crossbowmen and 70 pikemen garrisoned. Although outnumbered, the Dutch forces were well trained and defended. The pure pride of the people and revolutionary fervor almost scared off French general Jean Luc in the beginning, but he fought with passion. The Dutch people ended successful in the small-scale battle, only loosing 11 men compared to Jean Luc’s loss of 79. Jean Luc gave up, and instead of bothering with a full-scale war, Louis XIV recognized the independence of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, under its first king, King Joseph I of Amsterdam.

    The Dublin Crisis and Early Dutch Expansion
    After the Dutch colonization of Morocco and their conversion to Christianity, a period of expansion began. Northern Africa was seen as a rich and productive area, free from foreign domination of any kind. Joseph I ordered a group of settlers to establish a colony in the area of Africa known as Morocco, where contact was established with Malinese leader Mansa Musa. The colony thrived, and had great impact on the Netherlands, including King Joseph’s conversion to Christianity. In 1235, King Joseph I made an alliance with Queen Elizabeth of England against the Independent City-State of Ath-Cliath, located in Ireland. King Joseph sent a troop of crossbowmen to assist the English in their war, but arrived to find no English troops and a poorly defended Ath-Cliath. The crossbowmen conquered Ath-Cliath, and renamed the city Dublin. The English misinterpreted this victory as a threat and a move towards war. In reality, King Joseph planned to give the city to her majesty, but after the Dutch diplomat in London was tossed out of the city, King Joseph decided to keep the city, which became a successful colony, but upset Elizabeth. After a few years, relations smoothed, but Dublin remained Dutch.

    The Battle of 1455 and the Spaniard War
    In 1455, the Spanish Empire was growing at an alarming rate, invading France. Germany had already entered the war on the French side, but could not prevent the near-collapse of the French government after Spanish troops took Bordeaux. King Joseph officially declared war on the Spanish in 1455, and began a war to last many years. One month after war was declared Dutch troops hailing from Dutch Morocco took Melilla, to the delight of the Dutch, French, and German people. In 1490, England joined the war on the side of the Spanish. Shortly after, King Joseph made peace with Queen Isabella of Spain, not wanting to risk conflict with mighty England. Melilla was kept, and prospered. In the late 1500s, the Dutch settled Denmark, finally claiming the disputed area for her own. The Vikings and Germans lost all hold in the area, and the Netherlands finally claimed the land of fertility.

    The rule of Jonathan the Weak
    Shortly after the settlement of the New World in the late 1500s, the beloved King Joseph I died, and this began the rule of his son, Jonathan. King Jonathan was expected to follow in his father’s footsteps, and to be a peaceful ruler in most cases. But as soon as Jonathan the Weak came to power, he declared war on France and Germany, two of the Netherlands’s closest and friendliest neighbors. The plague hit soon afterward, and Hamborg (which had just recently joined the Kingdom of the Netherlands) was captured by the Germans. In 1670, Jonathan the Weak was bullied into an embarrassing peace treaty by the Germans, “liberating” Denmark to German control. In a brief sprawl with the American natives, New Amsterdam was also lost. Algers, a former French colony, revolted and joined the illustrious Dutch North African Colony. Louis XIV refused to make peace on Jonathan’s terms, so the war continued. Louis’ troops captured Amsterdam in a surprisingly unepic battle, and Jonathan the Weak was exiled to Mali, where he spent the rest of his life ruling the unimportant people there.

    Game played by Bob III
    Story Written by Bob III
     
  2. Hitti-Litti

    Hitti-Litti Deity

    Joined:
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    ^^

    Look at your first sentence, and correct the year. :lol:
     
  3. Bob III

    Bob III Lazy Roamer

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    Ooops. Corrected. =P
     

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