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Favourite Historical Weapon ?

Discussion in 'World History' started by kiwitt, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. Phrossack

    Phrossack Armored Fish and Armored Men

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    Spoiler :

    Very few modern tests of medieval armor are remotely accurate, what with different construction techniques, materials, what the plate's set up against, whether or not it has padding under it, etc.

    Don't get me wrong, the English longbow was a mighty weapon, but certainly not the armor-piercing, empire-building medieval machine gun that many make it out to be. And plate is actually quite flexible:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xm11yAXeegg
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMuNXWFPewg
     
  2. Bugfatty300

    Bugfatty300 Buddha Squirrel

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    The AK is somewhat overrated in some circles but atrociously constructed? How so? Unless you're talking about Kyber Pass manufacture, AKs were and are as solidly built as anything in the west and the design's reputation for reliability and ruggedness certainly isn't a myth.
     
  3. Flying Pig

    Flying Pig Utrinque Paratus Moderator

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    Heavy, generally quite unwieldy; definitely 'a handle for the bayonet' in Patton's words more than a shooting weapon.
     
  4. Bugfatty300

    Bugfatty300 Buddha Squirrel

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    Most variants are as light as modern 5.56x45mm designs and are on par with most AR-15s. Unwieldy is a matter of opinion I guess. The sights are not the best, the position of safety/selector is awkwardly positioned but they are just a comfortable to aim and handle as anything else I shoot.
     
  5. GoodSarmatian

    GoodSarmatian Temporary Configuration

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    Tables, chairs, ladders...
    Anything I can get my hands on,.


    Link to video.
     
  6. holy king

    holy king Chieftain

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    i, for one, always exchanged my american rifle for an ak as soon as i killed the first ruskie in operation flashpoint, since it was that much easier to handle.
     
  7. NedimNapoleon

    NedimNapoleon Weird Little Human

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    You train a guy with no education in a day to use and clean it. Its the peoples weapon.
     
  8. Flying Pig

    Flying Pig Utrinque Paratus Moderator

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    That's its benefit, but of course there's always the zeroeth law of squaddy-proofing that if, against all the odds, somebody ever designs a peice of kit which the soldier cannot break, the soldier will lose it.
     
  9. say1988

    say1988 Chieftain

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    Out of curiosity, do you know how modern AK models (i.e. AK-10X) compare to western assault rifles?
     
  10. That nerdy kid

    That nerdy kid Vampire Slayer Slayer

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    Girandoni Air Rifle
     
  11. vogtmurr

    vogtmurr Chieftain

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    The Czech, Israeli Galil, and Finnish rifles in particular, were built to a very high standard. The Valmet M76 (both in 7.62 Soviet and 5.56 NATO) compares favourably to any standard rifle in the west, and is built on the same general action and design as the AK. These are not so modern now of course but indicate even in the AK's heyday the weapon was sound in principle.
     
  12. Cheezy the Wiz

    Cheezy the Wiz Socialist In A Hurry

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    The halberd is certainly a handsome, versatile, and effective weapon. But "weapon" comprising such a huge selection of objects, I'm forced to compare it with this beautiful contraption:



    There is a story about NVA troops encountering an ANZAC unit armed with FALs in Vietnam; they thought they had encountered a number of .50 caliber machine guns, because the rubber trees they had learned to hide behind from the smaller American rounds were being split by the Australians' rifles.
     
  13. Flying Pig

    Flying Pig Utrinque Paratus Moderator

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    Ah, the good old SLR. The Aussies actually were particularly inventive with their weapons back in Malaya days; they cut the barrel short and filed down the safety sears so that the weapon would fire automatic. As a result, they had an aggressive, short-ranged killing machine which tore through the light cover: the 800m accuracy that the 'original' rife had was totally redundant in terrain where you couldn't see 10m most of the time.
     
  14. Bugfatty300

    Bugfatty300 Buddha Squirrel

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    Interesting that the rifles in the picture appear to be chambered in 5.56x45mm and apparently accepts M16 magazines too.

    I wonder where I could buy one of those.
     
  15. gangleri2001

    gangleri2001 垃圾收集日!!!

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    Old school never dies.
     
  16. Luckymoose

    Luckymoose The World is Mine

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    I have to agree on rocks, but...



    Biggest rock is best rock!
     
  17. mayor

    mayor Heart & Mind

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    :mischief:
     
  18. Tee Kay

    Tee Kay Challenge accepted

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  19. Cheezy the Wiz

    Cheezy the Wiz Socialist In A Hurry

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    Fascinating. I love stories of soldiers' "battlefield engineering" and doing awesome/crazy stuff like this.

    I believe it's a Canadian model. Still NATO 7.62x51.
     
  20. vogtmurr

    vogtmurr Chieftain

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    Thats not the Canadian model - but it may be the FNC 5.56 version.

    The one I was trained on looked like this but wasn't identical (this is actually the UK L1A1). Note the straight magazine.
    Spoiler :

    Yes there are cases where the 7.62 still shines over the 5.56, as noted certain kinds of cover, and at any appreciable distance in a crosswind, I guarantee if you are firing tracer you will see a major difference between the two.

    As far as 'favourite weapons', all of the ones mentioned are interesting, but as a kid growing up, who could deny there was a great variety of fighter jets in the cold war era to choose from:

    Spoiler :





    Since then, I've found the Treaty Era warships 1920-36 to be fascinating, because designers had to really optimize the balance between speed, firepower, protection, and seaworthiness in order to stay within treaty era displacements. With such restrictions on numbers and size, every class counted. The evolution in that period in response to developments in other countries posed unique challenges to naval architects that didn't exist once the design restrictions 'opened up'.
    Spoiler :
     

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