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French Wonders

Discussion in 'Civ5 - Mod Components' started by Salamandre, Nov 30, 2015.

  1. Salamandre

    Salamandre King

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    20 FRENCH NATIONAL WONDERS
    (available to only France Civilization )​



    La Bastille
    Bastille was a fortress in Paris, known formally as the Bastille Saint-Antoine. It played an important role in the internal conflicts of France and for most of its history was used as a state prison by the kings of France. It was stormed by a crowd on 14 July 1789 in the French Revolution, becoming an important symbol for the French Republican movement, and was later demolished and replaced by the Place de la Bastille.

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    Le vignoble de Bordeaux

    (Bordeaux famous Vineyard) A Bordeaux wine is any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France, centred on the city of Bordeaux and covering the whole area of the Gironde department, with a total vineyard area of over 120,000 hectares, making it the largest wine growing area in France. Average vintages produce over 700 million bottles of Bordeaux wine, ranging from large quantities of everyday table wine, to some of the most expensive and prestigious wines in the world.

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    De Gaulle carrier

    Charles de Gaulle is the flagship of the French Navy and the largest western European warship currently in commission. She is the tenth French aircraft carrier, the first French nuclear-powered surface vessel, and the first and so far only nuclear-powered carrier completed outside of the United States Navy. She is named after French statesman and general Charles de Gaulle.

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    Chenonceau Castle

    The Chateau de Chenonceau is a French chateau spanning the River Cher, near the small village of Chenonceaux. An architectural mixture of late Gothic and early Renaissance, Chateau de Chenonceau and its gardens are open to the public. Other than the Royal Palace of Versailles, it is the most visited chateau in France.

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    Disney Land

    Disneyland Paris, originally Euro Disney Resort, is an entertainment resort in Marne-la-Vallee, a new town located 32 km east of the centre of Paris, and is the most visited theme park in all of France and Europe. Disneyland Paris had become the number one tourist destination for Europe, outselling the Louvre and the Eiffel Tower.

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  2. Salamandre

    Salamandre King

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    Les Champs Elysées

    The Avenue des Champs-Elysees is probably the most famous avenue in the world. This impressive street stretches from the Place the la Concorde to the Place Charles de Gaulle, the site of the Arc de Triomphe. The Champs-Elysees is almost two kilometers long and seventy meters wide. At its western end the street is bordered by cinemas, theaters, cafes and luxury shops. On the opposite end, near the Place de la Concorde, the street is bordered by the Jardins des Champs-Elysees, beautifully arranged gardens with fountains and some grand buildings including the Grand and Petit Palais at the southern side and the Elysee at its northern side. The latter has been the residence of the French Presidents since 1873.

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    Fontainebleau Palace

    The Palace of Fontainebleau is located 55 kilometres southeast of the centre of Paris, and is one of the largest French royal chateaux. The medieval castle and later chateau was the residence of French monarchs from Louis VII through Napoleon III. Napoleon I abdicated his throne there before being exiled to Elba. Today it is a national museum and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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    Opera Garnier

    The Palais Garnier is a 1,979-seat opera house, which was built from 1861 to 1875 for the Paris Opera. The Palais Garnier is probably the most famous opera house in the world, a symbol of Paris like Notre Dame Cathedral, the Louvre, or the Sacre Coeur Basilica.

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    Lascaux Grottos

    Lascaux (Lascaux Caves) is the setting of a complex of caves in southwestern France famous for its Paleolithic cave paintings. The original caves are located near the village of Montignac, in the department of Dordogne. They contain some of the best-known Upper Paleolithic art. These paintings are estimated to be 17,300 years old. They primarily consist of images of large animals, most of which are known from fossil evidence to have lived in the area at the time. In 1979, Lascaux was added to the UNESCO World Heritage Sites list along with other prehistoric sites in the Vezere valley.

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    Luxembourg Gardens

    The Jardin du Luxembourg, or the Luxembourg Garden, located in Paris, was created beginning in 1612 by Marie de Medici, the widow of King Henry IV of France, for a new residence she constructed, the Luxembourg Palace. The garden today is owned by the French Senate, which meets in the Palace. It covers 23 hectares and is known for its lawns, tree-lined promenades, flowerbeds, the model sailboats on its circular basin, and for the picturesque Medici Fountain, built in 1620.

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  3. Salamandre

    Salamandre King

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    Le champ de Mars

    The Champ de Mars (Field of Mars) is a large public greenspace in Paris. The park is named after the Campus Martius in Rome, a tribute to the Latin name of the Roman God of war. The name also alludes to the fact that the lawns here were formerly used as drilling and marching grounds by the French military. The construction, in 1765, of the Ecole Militaire was the first step toward the Champ de Mars in its present form. Grounds for military drills were originally planned for an area south of the school, the current location of the place de Fontenoy. The choice to build an esplanade to the north of the school led to the erection of the noble facade which today encloses the Champ de Mars. The planners leveled the ground, surrounded it with a large ditch and a long avenue of elms, and, as a final touch, the esplanade was enclosed by a fine grille-work fence.

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    Le Mont-Saint-Michel

    Le Mont-Saint-Michel is an island commune in Normandy, France. The island has held strategic fortifications since ancient times and since the 8th century AD has been the seat of the monastery from which it draws its name. The structural composition of the town exemplifies the feudal society that constructed it: on top, God, the abbey and monastery; below, the great halls; then stores and housing; and at the bottom, outside the walls, houses for fishermen and farmers. Its unique position — on an island just 600 metres from land — made it accessible at low tide to the many pilgrims to its abbey, but defensible as an incoming tide stranded, drove off, or drowned, would-be assailants. The Mont remained unconquered during the Hundred Years' War; a small garrison fended off a full attack by the English in 1433. One of France's most recognizable landmarks, Mont Saint-Michel and its bay are part of the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites and more than 3 million people visit it each year.

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    Le Mont Blanc

    Mont Blanc is the highest mountain in the Alps and the highest peak in Europe outside of the Caucasus range. The Mont Blanc massif is being put forward as a potential World Heritage Site because of its uniqueness and its cultural importance, considered the birthplace and symbol of modern mountaineering.

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    Le palais des Papes

    The Palais des Papes (Papal palace) is a historical palace in Avignon, southern France, one of the largest and most important medieval Gothic buildings in Europe. One time fortress and palace, the papal residence was the seat of Western Christianity during the 14th century. Due to its immense size, the Palais was also the place where the general organisation of the Church began to change. It facilitated the centralisation of services and the adaption of operations in order to suit the needs of the papacy, creating a truly central administration for the Church. Since 1995, the Palais des Papes has been classified, along with the historic center of Avignon, as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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    Le Pont Neuf

    The Pont Neuf (New Bridge) is the oldest standing bridge across the river Seine in Paris. In the seventeenth century, that bridge of memories, the old Pont Neuf of Paris, was the rendezvous of quacksalvers and mountebanks. Booths for the sale of various articles lined the sides of the bridge. People flocked there to see the sights, laugh, chat, make love and enjoy life as only Parisians can. Students and grisettes of the Quartier Latin elbowed ladies and gentlemen of the court. Bourgeois families came to study the flippant manners of their superiors. Poodle clippers plied their trade; jugglers amused the quid nuncs with feats of dexterity; traveling dentists pulled teeth and sold balsams; clowns tumbled; and last, but not least, pickpockets lifted purses and silk handkerchiefs with impunity.

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  4. Salamandre

    Salamandre King

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    Le Golphe de Porto

    The coast of the Gulf of Porto is one of Corsica's most famous landscapes, and rightly so - with its dramatic sculpted red rock and sweeping bays it has to be seen to be believed. The pinnacles and ravines of the red granite Calanches soar out of beautiful blue seas framed by the jagged peaks of Paglia Orba. They are best explored by foot or by boat. There are daily boat trips from Porto that visit this UNESCO world heritage site.

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    La pyramide du Louvre

    Of all the Grands Projets in Paris, none created such a stir as the Pei Pyramids in the courtyard of the famous Louvre Museum. Spectacular in concept and form, they provide a startling reminder of the audacious ability of modern architects to invigorate and re-circulate traditional architectural forms. The main Pyramid is basically a complex inter-linked steel structure sheathed in reflective glass. In fact it is an entrance doorway providing a long-overdue entrance portico to the main galleries of the Louvre. As one descends into the interior entrance foyer, the dramatic nature of the intervention becomes apparent. The main Pyramid, which certainly disturbs the balance of the old Louvre courtyard, is countered by two smaller pyramids, which provide further light and ventilation to the subterranean spaces. Completed in 1989, it has become a landmark of the city of Paris.

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    Le Theatre Antique d'Orange

    The Theatre antique d'Orange is an ancient Roman theatre in Orange, France, built early in the 1st century AD. It is one of the best preserved of all the Roman theatres in the Roman colony of Arausio which was founded in 40 BC. Playing a major role in the life of the citizens, who spent a large part of their free time there, the theatre was seen by the Roman authorities not only as a means of spreading Roman culture to the colonies, but also as a way of distracting them from all political activities. As the Western Roman Empire declined during the 4th century, by which time Christianity had become the official religion, the theatre was closed by official edict in AD 391 since the Church opposed what it regarded as uncivilized spectacles. After that, the theatre was abandoned completely. It was sacked and pillaged by the barbarians and was used as a defensive post in the Middle Ages. During the 16th-century religious wars, it became a refuge for the townspeople.

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    L'arc du Triomphe

    The Arc de Triomphe de l'Etoile (Triumphal Arch of the Star) is one of the most famous monuments in Paris. The Arc de Triomphe honours those who fought and died for France in the French Revolutionary and the Napoleonic Wars, with the names of all French victories and generals inscribed on its inner and outer surfaces. Beneath its vault lies the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from World War I. The monument was designed by Jean Chalgrin in 1806 and its iconographic program pits heroically nude French youths against bearded Germanic warriors in chain mail. It set the tone for public monuments with triumphant patriotic messages.

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    Versailles

    The Palace of Versailles is a royal chateau in Versailles in the Ile-de-France region of France. It is also known as the Chateau de Versailles. The court of Versailles was the centre of political power in France from 1682, when Louis XIV moved from Paris, until the royal family was forced to return to the capital in October 1789 after the beginning of the French Revolution. Versailles is therefore famous not only as a building, but as a symbol of the system of absolute monarchy of the Ancien Regime.

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  5. How to know

    How to know Chieftain

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    Great job! Really like the splash screens! Also is it possible to make them available to all the Civs as world wonders? After all, thank you for the release.
     
  6. Buridan

    Buridan Chieftain

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    :old: In my opinion most of these wonders are too strong in comparison to other wonders of the required techs :badcomp:
    The only wonders that are good as they are are
    La pyramide du Louvre, Le Theatre Antique d'Orange, L'arc du Triomphe, Versailles, Le champ de Mars, Le palais des Papes, Opera Garnier, Luxebourg Garden and De Gaulle carrier.

    For all the others:
    Le Golphe de Porto - food and production from sea tiles is too much, also the +1 movement / +1 vision is already good for the great lighthouse.
    Le Mont Saint Michel - not +1 food AND +1 prod on hill tiles. Only one of them would be enough, together with the other things this is ok.
    Le Mont Blanc - does it count for all mountains or only for natural wonders? I think someone already modded the Mont Blanc as a buildable natural wonder; try comparing to that one.
    Pont Neuf - either only +1 food / +1 prod for river tiles in the city OR worker movement cost is 1 and +15% wonder production. But please not both in one wonder, thats too much.
    Fontainebleau Palace - this is too op. And I have no idea what changes would make it acceptable - either remove it or find some other not so powerful boni.
    Lascaux Grottos - the +1 prod on "this, this,.. and this" resource is ok, even the improvement speed is acceptable (maybe just +10% perhaps) but the other +x prod should be removed.
    La Bastille - the idea is ok, but I think both production boni should be removed since the promotion is pretty strong.
    The vignoble de Bordeaux - o.O +20% gold AND ... AND +5 gold / 2 prod / +1 culture for wine AND a free merchant? come on, just the bonus for wine would be enough, anything additional makes it imba.
    Chenonceau Castle - Either only giving mounted units this promotion OR giving all the rest (+2 culture and 5 prod with gunpowder and +25% xp per artwork)

    additional: the "De Gaulle carrier" should more be a unit, don't you think? Is it possible to make world units like in civ IV? that would be much better for this one. Also the Louvre already exists, it wasn't neccessary to make an other version for it; bt alright, you did that and that is ok :lol:

    And as a last thing. Many of the wonders are giving very much production. Do you plan on using them in a scenario about France? If yes then it might be ok for them how they are now - depending on the tweaks the scenario makes on the game rules

    And of course: gratulation for the these pieces of work :goodjob:
     
  7. Craig_Sutter

    Craig_Sutter Deity

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    You may want to consider the Walls of Carcassone as a wonder.
     
  8. Salamandre

    Salamandre King

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    Hi, thanks for feedback.

    I am aware they are strong but as I specified on steam I only play at deity and there is no way atm to make wonders rewards modular, to adapt to each difficulty level.
    So in my approach I start from the idea that those will be the ONLY wonders you will be able to construct. Sure, if you play low difficulty then you will probably tramp AI, but why not try to go deity when playing with those wonders, could be interesting.

    Now about details: in general the required conditions are very difficult to meet, take as example the Bordeaux vineyards. You think 5 gold and +2 production for worked wine tiles is broken, but look in your saves, how many of your games you have more than 2 wine luxuries in same city borders? It happened to me once in 10 games that I found 2 close each other. This means +10 gold, 2 culture and 4 hammers for one big wonder. Looks to me ok.

    And so on. On the other side, there are dozens of wonders available on steam, which I downloaded then I found myself in the game never produce them because they were not worth and time to invest. A lot of them. A wonder which gives 5 gold and 1 production is not worth to build if it takes 50 turns. if you put your city on wealth for 50 turns, the benefit on the entire game will be greater.
     

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