1. We have added the ability to collapse/expand forum categories and widgets on forum home.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. All Civ avatars are brought back and available for selection in the Avatar Gallery! There are 945 avatars total.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. To make the site more secure, we have installed SSL certificates and enabled HTTPS for both the main site and forums.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Civ6 is released! Order now! (Amazon US | Amazon UK | Amazon CA | Amazon DE | Amazon FR)
    Dismiss Notice
  5. Dismiss Notice
  6. Forum account upgrades are available for ad-free browsing.
    Dismiss Notice

Great Quotes Δ' : Being laconic is being philosophical

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Kyriakos, Jul 22, 2018.

Tags:
  1. Kyriakos

    Kyriakos Alien spiral maker

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    49,880
    Location:
    Thessalonike, The Byzantine Empire
  2. Lohrenswald

    Lohrenswald nIGHTMARE

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2013
    Messages:
    5,406
    Location:
    The end
  3. r16

    r16 not deity

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2008
    Messages:
    4,514
    ı haven't become printable yet , so it must go to what people in CFC have themselves said thread .
     
  4. GoodSarmatian

    GoodSarmatian Temporary Pattern...still recognizably human...

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2006
    Messages:
    8,979
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The Horned City, The Abyss
    This one doesn't require source and context ?
    Here's one I remember from an internet comment somewhere a couple of years back:
    "The fundamentalist doesn't worship God. The Fundamentalist worships himself by proxy of God."
     
  5. Arakhor

    Arakhor Dremora Courtier Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Messages:
    28,917
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    UK
    Moderator Action: Whilst certain posts may contain memorable quotes, please use the Brought to you by CFC thread for comments made on these forums. Thank you.
     
  6. civvver

    civvver Chieftain

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    4,366
    I always liked:

    Work is the curse of the drinking class. -Oscar Wilde

    and

    If you define the problem correctly, you almost have the solution. -Steve Jobs. Cus it's so true. People try to make and design things without understanding the purpose of the thing. All things are to solve some sort of problem.
     
    yung.carl.jung and Kyriakos like this.
  7. Thorvald of Lym

    Thorvald of Lym A Little Sketchy

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Messages:
    7,883
    Location:
    A Palace north of Oslo
    My father put it in a similar way; roughly paraphrased: "Everyone has a solution, but few actually know the problem."
     
    Hrothbern and Kyriakos like this.
  8. Kyriakos

    Kyriakos Alien spiral maker

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    49,880
    Location:
    Thessalonike, The Byzantine Empire
    "Believing in progress does not mean believing that any progress has yet been made".
    Franz Kafka
     
    yung.carl.jung likes this.
  9. SS-18 ICBM

    SS-18 ICBM Oscillator

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2006
    Messages:
    15,072
    Location:
    Here and there
    As long as it's laconic or philosophical, I suppose.

    Anyway, this one is certainly the former.
    "N U T S"
    -Gen. Anthony McAuliffe (US 101st Airborne Division), 22 December 1944 response to surrender demand of Gen. Hasso von Manteuffel (German 5th Panzer Army) during the Siege of Bastogne
    Spoiler :
    The response was typewritten on a piece of paper. One surmises that in later times it would be an electronic message, stylized as

    N U T S
    U
    T
    S

    On a more philosophical note, some Camus. While I take umbrage with his overall hostility to the powers (and potential benefits) of reason, he makes a good point in the necessity of setting limits on our hubris.
    "Socrates, facing the threat of being condemned to death, acknowledged only this one superiority in himself: what he did not know he did not claim to know. The most exemplary life and thought of those centuries close on a proud confession of ignorance. Forgetting that, we have forgotten our virility. We have preferred the power that apes greatness, first Alexander and then the Roman conquerors whom the authors of our schoolbooks, through some incomparable vulgarity, teach us to admire."
    -Albert Camus, Helen's Exile (translation by Justin O'Brien)
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2018
    yung.carl.jung likes this.
  10. Dachs

    Dachs Lord Baldemort

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    32,101
    Location:
    Thedas
    22 December 1945, huh? :p

    Joking aside, I like that quotation. I like lots of pithy quotations from military history, even if they didn't actually happen that way. Military evergreens!

    ---

    "Wicked men, you are sinning against your fathers, who conquered the world under Philip and Alexander!"
    [Epi tous pateras, ho kakai kephalai, tous meta Filippou kai Alexandrou ta ola kateirgasmenous]

    -Antigenes, commander of the Silver Shields, at the Battle of Gabiene, 316 BC, pace Diodoros Sikeliotes XIX.41

    Spoiler explanation :
    Antigenes was a commander in the army of Eumenes of Kardia during the wars of Alexander's successors. At Gabiene, Eumenes' troops fought the army of Antigonos. Many of Antigonos' troops were relatively newly joined, or had served in the west during the conquests of Alexander. Antigenes, however, commanded the Silver Shields (Argyraspidai), a unit partially comprised of sexagenarian veterans of Alexander's wars. In the two battles that Eumenes fought with Antigonos, at Paraitakene and Gabiene, the Argyraspidai outfought every unit sent to attack them, and defeated every unit they attacked.

    According to Diodoros, this particular message was actually shouted by a horseman who took his instructions from Antigenes and rode out between the lines. Diodoros' source for the campaigns of Eumenes was the historian Hieronymos of Kardia, a countryman of Eumenes', officer in his army, and later a general and administrator for Antigonos; Hieronymos' history is generally reliable.

    I have seen the quotation translated both as a rhetorical question and as a statement.


    "I hope to go through the Siegfried Line like [redacted] through a goose. That is not quotable."

    -MG George S. Patton Jr., CG Third Army, press conference 7 SEP 1944 2100 hours, pace Martin Blumenson, The Patton Papers

    Spoiler explanation :
    Patton's Third Army had just completed its rapid dash across France, bagging thousands of German prisoners and bypassing every defense line the Germans could throw together. Next came the defenses of the West Wall, which the Western Allies referred to as the Siegfried Line. (Ironically, the Germans actually did have a Siegfried Line in the First World War, but the Allies chose to call it the "Hindenburg Line".) Patton consistently denigrated the value of fortifications, and suggested that a man who used fortifications knew he was going to get beaten, otherwise he wouldn't need to use them. This was very pithy and quotable, but as it turned out, Third Army had a remarkably tough time with the German defenses in the fall of 1944.

    First came the barrier of the Moselle River in eastern France. Patton gave his press conference during Third Army's initial attempt to force the Moselle, which did not go well; he remained publicly optimistic and even seemed disconnected from the battle to cross the river, as if he were still in "pursuit mode" and this was just a temporary obstacle. Eventually, however, Third Army managed to cross the Moselle and fought a series of difficult battles with German armored reserves in Lorraine.

    Mud and poor supply slowed the Americans down, but even worse was Patton's inexplicable fascination with the fortress of Metz. Before the First World War, back when the Germans controlled the city, they had upgraded the Metz-Diedenhofen fortress complex to a network of highly advanced armored fortifications, thoroughly protected against modern high explosives. Later, Metz was integrated into the French Maginot Line. It was the fortress par excellence, and it had been the American objective in November 1918 before the Armistice intervened. Patton, who had served in the American Expeditionary Force during that war, became obsessed with the notion of "finishing the job" from 1918, and ordered an entire army corps, Walton Walker's XX, to waste the entire autumn trying to capture Metz from a numerically and qualitatively inferior German force. The German commanders of Army Group G, Balck and Mellenthin, were happy to see the Americans waste months on a glorified outpost rather than the real German vulnerabilities. The Americans suffered significant casualties in the attempt to reduce Metz, and still had not even managed to reach the Siegfried Line - let alone go through it like crap through a goose.

    Patton's Third Army did not end up breaking through the West Wall until 1945.


    "We're in a chamber pot, and tomorrow we're going to be [redacted] on."

    -General Auguste Ducrot, CG 1st Corps, night of 31 AUG - 1 SEP 1870, immediately before the Battle of Sedan, pace Dr. C. Sarazin, Récits sur la dernière guerre franco-allemande, quoted in Showalter, Wars of German Unification

    Spoiler explanation :
    In the summer and fall of 1870, the imperial French army was about as obliging an enemy as the Germans could have expected. First, the Army of the Rhine fought the Germans alone around the fortress of Metz and let itself be besieged there. Then, the rescue effort of the Army of Chalons was badly mismanaged, and after it marched to the fortress of Sedan on the Belgian border it soon found that the German army had arrived to encircle it. The night before the Battle of Sedan, German campfires formed a semicircle of light around the trapped French. The German commander, General Moltke, called the position a "mousetrap"; Ducrot, according to Sarazin, the senior medical officer of one of his divisions, had a rather more homely metaphor.


    "Oh Lord, if you won't give us the victory today, at least don't give it to those scum on the other side! In God's name, march!"
    [Lieber Gott, steh mir heute bei, oder willst du mir nicht beistehen, so hilf wenigstens auch dem Schurken von Feind, sondern sieh wie's kommt. In Gottes Namen, marsch!]

    -General Leopold I, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau, prayer delivered before his troops immediately before the Battle of Kesselsdorf, 15 DEC 1745 (sources basically innumerable)

    Spoiler explanation :
    Fairly straightforward, I should think.

    Some historians, e.g. Ranke, claim that attributing the quotation to Leopold von Anhalt-Dessau is an error and that it was actually said by Count Sporck at the Battle of St. Gotthard in 1664. This particular sentiment, however, is pretty common in Christian armies, and one writer suggests that it goes back as far as the Third Crusade. The Old Dessauer's formulation here, though, is the most famous.

    Leopold's army of Prussians was slightly outnumbered by the Austro-Saxon army it fought at Kesselsdorf, but it still won the battle. Frederick the Great, who was within a day's ride but not actually present at the battle, apparently removed his hat in salute to the Old Dessauer when meeting him that evening, in acknowledgment of the aged warrior's victory. It was the Old Dessauer's swan song; the Peace of Dresden, which ended the war, was signed shortly thereafter, and he died two years later.

    A literal translation of the quotation would be something like "oh Lord, stand by me today, but if you don't wish to stand by me, at least don't help those enemy scoundrels, but rather see how it goes [i.e. "let us try it ourselves"]! In the name of God, march!"
     
    GoodSarmatian and Kyriakos like this.
  11. Kyriakos

    Kyriakos Alien spiral maker

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    49,880
    Location:
    Thessalonike, The Byzantine Empire
    Going from the text in greek, it seems to say "(you turn/fight) Against/onto your fathers, oh bad minds (literally bad heads), the ones who conceived* of it all under Philip and Alexander" :)

    *the verb "katergazomai" (ta ola kateirgasmenous) means to process; eg in industry it means to turn a primary material into something else, through a process. More specifically when used about ideas it refers to making an elaborate concept; eg to weave a plan is often written using this term; katergazomai schedion etc.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2018
    SS-18 ICBM, GoodSarmatian and Dachs like this.
  12. Kaitzilla

    Kaitzilla Lord Croissant

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Messages:
    7,611
    Location:
    America!
    Bow before the witty onslaught of the Dread Emperors and Dread Empresses of Praes!

    #1 Dread Emperor Traitorous
    #2 Dread Empress Malevolent II
    #3 Dread Emperor Irritant I :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2018
    Dachs likes this.
  13. Dachs

    Dachs Lord Baldemort

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    32,101
    Location:
    Thedas
    Thank you!

    Your explanation, for whatever reason, reminded me of this.

     
    Kyriakos likes this.
  14. Kyriakos

    Kyriakos Alien spiral maker

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    49,880
    Location:
    Thessalonike, The Byzantine Empire
    The annoying lack of a double "p" in the english version of Philippos keeps making me give that term a double l! :D
     
  15. Commodore

    Commodore Technology of Peace

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2005
    Messages:
    9,842
    Location:
    The Tiberium Future
    "Wakanda forever, but where's my money?"

    -Denzel Washington
     
  16. Takhisis

    Takhisis Would-be overnight hero

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    38,836
    Location:
    up yours!
  17. r16

    r16 not deity

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2008
    Messages:
    4,514
    there are unfounded allegations that ı am not anti-American recently . And while there is indeed a claimed attempt by the US to economically punish New Turkey for the so-called Strategic partnership with Iran (which is merely a temporary Qatari need in face of Saudi pressure and am not the one ever to say New Turkey is like ever for Turkish interests) this is entirely personal . Stuntwoman , being what she is , is now painted as valueless , so that she or her country people might take offence , despite to apparently prevalent objection of "But, she is beautiful..." and like obvious this will be my bane for the next five years or whatever . So from a book , like of which will not available in New Turkey , because they respect Kemal for the duration :

    How George Washington Fleeced the Nation And Other Little Secrets Airbrushed From History.

    Spoiler :


    "On closer inspection, other elements of America’s ‘founding story’ are also not quite as clear cut as our teachers led us to believe. The original break with the mother country is laid at the feet of the British, whose policy of extortionate taxation viciously pushed the reasonable colonists too far. In fact, all the taxes raised in America stayed in America and were to be used for ensuring the military defence of the colonists themselves. They always intentionally aimed only to recover a small proportion of actual costs, the rest having to be met by British taxpayers.


    The infamous Townshend duties, imposed by the British Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1767 on a range of household goods, including glass, paper and, notoriously, imported tea, and which history portrays as being responsible for igniting the American Revolution, were planned to raise in their first year a mere £43,000 (from two and a half million colonists) to contribute towards defence costs estimated at £406,000. The individual scale of the demand was minimal. At the time, the average American paid sixpence a year in tax (about £2.60 in modern values). By comparison, their British counterpart was stumping up 25 shillings, 50 times more.
    ...

    The Boston Tea Party in 1773, the iconic rebuffing of excessive British taxes, was in fact nothing of the sort. The measures being protested were injurious all right, but not for the reasons history asks us to remember. The attack on the tea shipments in Boston harbour was in reaction to the introduction of the Tea Act, by which Britain was seeking to increase tea imports into America to help save the ailing East India Company from bankruptcy. The Act in fact reduced taxes on tea. That was the problem for American traders, who had profited enormously from smuggling the stuff in and undercutting the official market where tea sold very expensively because of the customs taxes levied. The Governor of Massachusetts estimated at the time that five-sixths of all tea consumed in the colony was smuggled. There was so much of the illicit trade going on, and few prosecutions, that engaging in it was regarded less as a serious crime and more as a commercial gamble. So reducing the tax threatened to undermine the lucrative smuggling trade with mountains of cheap legitimate tea. That was the problem the Bostonians had. And that was why they revolted. Post-Revolution, the story took on a far different and more uplifting patrioticly shade.


    ...

    An oft-quoted illustration of Washington’s dedication to the service of his country is the decision he made, when asked to take command of the Continental Army at the start of the War of Independence, to gallantly agree to forego a salary. He merely asked to be paid his expenses. It was a canny choice. Had he taken the pay (at $500 a month) he would have garnered $48,000 for his pains in his eight-year war service. By opting for expenses, his account at the end amounted to an eye-watering $447,220 (by the smallest estimate), in the order of $9 million in today’s values. He even managed to include in the bill the cost of a new carriage and imported wines for his headquarters.


    When Washington became America’s first President in 1789, he again offered to work ‘just for expenses’. A wiser Congress this time insisted on paying him a salary. At $25,000, it was the equivalent in modern values of over $600,000. (The official salary of the President today is only $400,000.)"
     
  18. Takhisis

    Takhisis Would-be overnight hero

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2005
    Messages:
    38,836
    Location:
    up yours!
    Some excerpts from a Long Read article which I found on the Graun:
    Coming face-to-face with the current onslaught of linguicide, I find myself wanting to venture a modest proposal. What if anglo-globalism wasn’t a one-way street? What if the pre-contact languages of the Americas were taught in American high schools? What if British schoolchildren learned some of the languages spoken by the actual residents of the former empire? (This is a utopian project obviously. But how much would it actually cost to add a linguistic elective to larger high schools? One jet fighter? A few cruise missiles?)

    (…)

    Noam Chomsky’s idea of a universal grammar underpinning all languages was based on a rather narrow empirical base. More recent research into dozens of smaller languages, like Kayardild and Pirahã, has been steadily whittling away at his list of supposed universals. We now know there are languages without adverbs, adjectives, prepositions and articles. There seems to be hardly anything that a language “needs” to be – just thousands of natural experiments in how they might be assembled. And most of them are about to be lost.

    (…)historically speaking, monolingualism is something of an aberration.

    (…)
    A resident of another linguistic hotspot, the Sepik region of Papua New Guinea, once told Evans: “It wouldn’t be any good if we talked the same; we like to know where people come from.” It’s a vision of Babel in reverse. Instead of representing a fall from human perfection, as in the biblical story, having many languages is a gift. It’s something to remember before we let English swallow the globe.​

    I really recommend that you read the entire article (and it's the Graun, no paywall and you can donate afterwards if you want).
     
  19. Kyriakos

    Kyriakos Alien spiral maker

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    49,880
    Location:
    Thessalonike, The Byzantine Empire
    According to an actual person of letters (Fernando Pessoa) there are only three languages likely to play an international role. English, Spanish, and Portuguese. Seems quite logical (maybe the portuguese one less so, but at least there is Brazil, and a couple african countries) given that French is only spoken as first language in France and a number of african nations, and German is only a first language in Germany/Austria and some bordering stuff (eg parts of Switzerland).

    Speaking at least a second language is obviously positive. For starters, you are always provided with added info if you don't identify something as a singularity. That said... it isn't like you gain much more if you can use base x, x1, x2 etc for arithmetic, despite gaining something if you are fluent in at least two different ways.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2018
  20. cardgame

    cardgame Obsessively Opposed to the Typical

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2009
    Messages:
    11,178
    Location:
    Misery
    Replace portuguese with chinese

    portugal and brazil cannot into relevance
     
    Kyriakos likes this.

Share This Page

Ebates: Get Paid to Shop