Have You Ditched Civ VI and Returned to Civ V?

Have You Reverted to Playing Civ V Instead of Civ VI?

  • Yes.

    Votes: 6 66.7%
  • Nope. Still playing Civ VI

    Votes: 3 33.3%

  • Total voters
    9

blackbutterfly

Emperor
Joined
May 9, 2016
Messages
1,246
Location
Leeds, UK
I decided to play test one of my map mods in Apocalypse mode inspired by England's heatwave, and it is just too easy even on Deity, compared to Civ V, HUMANKIND, etc. There are way too many exploits:
My maps are scripts similar to Civ V's Scrambled maps. In Apocalypse mode tiles become hyper-yielding after forest fires making it super easy to exploit simply by not chopping forest and jungle. It's a joke! 😂
 

Redaxe

Emperor
Joined
Aug 20, 2013
Messages
1,523
I was turned off from Civ 6 from the graphics style.
Civ 5 gets boring after a while because the game is let down by a few tedious mechanics that really should have been scrapped.

Cut back on the tedious tile improvement micro (this often takes up nearly or maybe more than half of your game time and is really a completely pointless exercise)
- cities should build their own farms automatically (micromanaging farms is silly & just gets worse and worse on larger maps)

Then add in some AI enhancements, government system, taxes, local happiness, health mechanism, some early tech tree rebalance, much faster early expansion but with a dark age mechanism that really hits hard in the late classical period and it would be set.
This way you'd be spending less time micromanaging workers and more time managing your civ.
 

blackbutterfly

Emperor
Joined
May 9, 2016
Messages
1,246
Location
Leeds, UK
Cut back on the tedious tile improvement micro (this often takes up nearly or maybe more than half of your game time and is really a completely pointless exercise)
- cities should build their own farms automatically (micromanaging farms is silly & just gets worse and worse on larger maps)

Yes, the micro of building roads in Civ V 😫
At least that is one thing that is automated in Civ VI (sort of). But Civ VI introduces its own set of micro. Gone are puppets which were very useful to manage larger empires.
In Civ VI large empires are a pain to manage especially endgame.

HUMANKIND for example does away with the worker altogether.
While you still have to build your own farms (as districts/quarters) you don't have to worry about worker micro.
 

KayAU

Emperor
Joined
Sep 1, 2014
Messages
1,018
I just finished another war in Vox Populi, as Japan finally capitulated after some 50-70 turns of conflict. I thought I'd share the story to give you an idea of how differently these things tend to play out when the AI is actually competent. First, a screenshot of the state of things immediately after the war:
Spoiler :

japancapitulated.jpg



So, first of all, the attack was not a surprise, as Nobunaga had attacked a few times earlier. He was friendly in the early game, but backstabbed me. Fortunately for me, my empire in the east was protected by the mountain range in the middle of the continent, and the fact that Lhasa and Panama City acted as a buffer between us. This, combined with the fact that the Shoshone gets a combat bonus in friendly territory, that I was in control of Mt Kilimanjaro, and that I had the Great Wall, meant I had an unusually easy time defending. However, striking back is an entirely different matter, so the previous confrontations had all ended in white peace. Now, for the latest, grander war, I wanted to find a more permanent solution. I knew that Nobunaga was planning another attack, as he was investing heavily in gaining the favour of Lhasa and Panama City. This would have given him much easier access to my lands as well as a good number of allied military units. Being aware of the threat, I was also pumping out diplomatic units and trying to solve their quests, as once war was declared, you can't really flip city states back. Fortunately, I had the city states allied to me when he finally declared war, and especially Lhasa did an excellent job as a first line of defense. I sent in my own units to support them, and together, we were holding off Nobunagas land forces. I was also helped by my highly upgraded Recon unit, who had extended vision and the ability to traverse mountains. He later became a casualty of war, but in the early stages he was invaluable for reconnaisance and harrassment.

After a while, Nobunaga offered me a peace treaty, but this time, I had different plans. I wanted to take Kagoshima, and maybe force capitulation, which would make him my vassal. It would also fullfil a city state quest and provide an XP boost to all my units. However, there were three main issues with this:
1. The geography, which had protected me, was doing an equally good job protecting Nobunaga. Anything I tried to send through the narrow pass northwest of Lhasa would be killed off very quickly.
2. My military forces were not nearly strong or advanced enough to push an assault without taking terrible losses.
3. Nobunaga had his Samurai units, which were really hard to kill, while easily destroying my units. Our tech levels were very similar, but his unique unit was in pgving him a definite edge.
To combat this, I did three things, which came together at nearly the same time:
1. Push for Gunpowder to get access to cannons and tercios. This would even out our unit strengths, and give me something which could survive a turn or two through the pass.
2. Build up a naval force in the north, which could support the assault, as well as a few landing troops to help gain a foothold.
3. Win the "Treasure Fleet" shared project. VP has a few more of these than the base game. Treasure fleet gives three rewards: a frigate (which no-one even had the tech for yet) for bronze, and admiral for silver, and a Grand Canal wonder in the capital for gold, which would give a small combat strength and sight boost for all naval units.

I immediately turned all my production towards Treasure Fleet, and managed to get all three rewards. Nobunaga and several others all managed to get the frigate and admiral. It also appeared that Nobunaga had noticed my naval buildup, as he had started to pump out ships himself. Still, I decided the timing was as good as it was going to get, and pushed the assault. My ships moved in from the north, and the frigate and some galeass helped me make room for the landing troops. I pushed a tercio through the pass, with cannons following close behind. My explorer was striking from the mountains. I lost quite a few units, but managed to finally take Kagoshima with a reasonable portion of my fighting force still alive. It was not quite enough to make Nobunaga capitulate though, so I set my eyes on Osaka. It was around this time I noticed an Assyrian naval force approaching from the southwest. I had some vessels there, doing some harassment and picking off the odd wounded unit moving too close to the coast, but pulled them back to let my unexpected help do their thing. To my joy, Nobunaga redeployed parts of his army to deal with the new invasion, which made it much easier for me to take Osaka. With Osaka in my control, Nobunaga finally capitulated, and he is now my vassal. I have lost a lot of units, but it was worth it. It is now time to rebuild, and especially to build up a navy capable of repelling future invasions. I also need to try and gain a tech advantage for the late game. In vanilla Civ 5 I would be leading by 10-20 techs at this point, but in VP, the aI usually leads by 1-3 techs in the mid-game. This time I'm already on par with them, though, so it's looking promising.

So that's how you can deal with the AI in VP...on Prince difficulty. I did win, but it took a concentrated effort, and I took serious losses along the way.
 

Fluffball

Prince
Joined
Sep 22, 2011
Messages
427
  • Yes, Climate System and coastal flooding in particular.
    This alters the map/geography sinking coastal tiles with global warming and rising tide...soz, sea level :)
  • The Canal district:
    in many maps it's useful to have the canal to be able to traverse maps with 2-3 tile isthmus.
    For example in Civ VI maps including the Nile, Levant and Arab peninsula it is possible to build canals and move navies across.
    Something not possible in Civ V.
  • 1-tile Wonders.
But I really miss playing tall in Civ V.
No puppet cities in Civ VI. Like Beyond Earth, it's a play wide game.
Civ VI only does climate system 'better' as it actually has a climate system (if you have the expansion).

Climate system is a joke though, like most of the other potentially interesting features Civ VI has. I even tried various mods to try to make it interesting but nothing could make it interesting.

It is extremely easy for the player to mitigate while the AI seems to be completely unable to deal with raising sea levels in particular and i particularly loved having my coastal resorts facing my massive sea wall...All the potential mitigating effects.i.e. clean energy come at a point when it is too late to make any difference to climate change (which is not reversable) and at a point in the game where your just freewheeling to the end of the game so you don't need additional power.

To the general topic. I tried Civ VI when it was released and got bored very quickly thus returned to Civ V with the Vox Populi Mod. I retried Civ VI a while ago when all the expansions were released and on a cheap deal hoping it would be like other games in the series where it starts pretty basic and becomes good when the expansions flesh it out and solve many of the original issues but while i liked many of the ideas they mostly seemed at best poorly thought out or unfinished or the AI was simply not able to use them properly which made them unfun.
I found it particularly laughable that while there are menu's upon menu's of information available i had to download a raft of mods to provide extremely basic information.e.g. i must have spent a huge amount of resources buying luxuries i already had or trying the sell the AI resources it already had because the game didn't tell me in the trade screen until i got a mod that told me.

Therefore after a couple of games i ditched Civ VI, never to return, and now solely play Civ V with the Vox Populi mod.

Even though i have played every version of Civ including Beyond Earth (which while not exactly an outstanding addition to the series is much better than Civ VI) and usually buy the next version the day it is released i am going to be waiting to see how it turns out and watching a lot of youtube videos to judge the gameplay before i even think about parting with my money for Civ 7.
 
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blackbutterfly

Emperor
Joined
May 9, 2016
Messages
1,246
Location
Leeds, UK
Civ VI only does climate system 'better' as it actually has a climate system (if you have the expansion).
Climate system is a joke though, like most of the other potentially interesting features Civ VI has.

YouTuber @Boesthius did a comprehensive video of how broken Civ VI is.

At least Civ V was left in a decent state when Firaxis moved on. Another reason why I have returned to Civ V.
 

KayAU

Emperor
Joined
Sep 1, 2014
Messages
1,018
Even though i have played every version of Civ including Beyond Earth (which while not exactly an outstanding addition to the series is much better than Civ VI) ...

You know, I actually think Beyond Earth -with the Rising Tide expansion- has a lot going for it, and keep returning to it every now and then. I even made a whole thread about it: :)
https://forums.civfanatics.com/threads/beyond-earth-a-flawed-underrated-gem.662341/
It's unfortunate that it was abandoned in the state it's in, as I think it was just one expansion away from true greatness. Unlike Civ 6, I think some more content would have gone a long way towards improving it. I think it suffered a bit due to a weak launch, and the inevitable comparison to the brilliant Alpha Centauri.
 

Fluffball

Prince
Joined
Sep 22, 2011
Messages
427
You know, I actually think Beyond Earth -with the Rising Tide expansion- has a lot going for it, and keep returning to it every now and then. I even made a whole thread about it: :)
https://forums.civfanatics.com/threads/beyond-earth-a-flawed-underrated-gem.662341/
It's unfortunate that it was abandoned in the state it's in, as I think it was just one expansion away from true greatness. Unlike Civ 6, I think some more content would have gone a long way towards improving it. I think it suffered a bit due to a weak launch, and the inevitable comparison to the brilliant Alpha Centauri.
I actually enjoyed it also and found it to be a solid game but didn't find it to be 'outstanding' although it certainly had the potential to be so. It built upon Civ V much more than Civ VI did which seemed more like they threw CiV V out the window and started again having forgotten everything that was good about Civ V.

BE also felt more natural like it followed on from a space victory in Civ V and i have even played a couple of games where i played BE after finishing a space victory in Civ V.
 

Iconian

Chieftain
Joined
May 16, 2021
Messages
71
To install it, check out this thread:
Huh, so the Community Patch is part of Vox Populi?

I subscribed to the Community Patch a few years back but never actually got around to using it, as I was more interested in looking at small mods. Also, I've been a lot more interested in using non-DLL mods. I believe that Gaia's core mod and Iska's Stones to Stars both make changes to the DLL file. My thought has been to try to put together a big mod using the best non-DLL mods out there. Then, once I have those together, I can start looking at the DLL mods.

One way or another, I have a lot of work cut out for me. These big mods have already covered so much territory, and it's tough figuring it all out . . .
 

Darth Tribble

Friendly Neighborhood Conqueror
Joined
Oct 14, 2013
Messages
115
Location
Earth
Sorta. I seem to alternate between IV and V.

I really want to like Civ VI, but it just cannot maintain my interest. I think I only ever one one game on Civ VI, and that's good enough for me.
 
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