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History questions not worth their own thread

Discussion in 'World History' started by philippe, Jan 17, 2009.

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  1. philippe

    philippe FYI, I chase trains.

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    How did the Habsburgs linked back to the house of troye in their completely over the top fabricated genaology?
     
  2. dutchfire

    dutchfire Deity Retired Moderator

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    Aeneas -> Rome?
     
  3. Dachs

    Dachs Hero of the Soviet Union

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    I'd guess their connection with the Palaeologus family, rulers of Byzantium, through whom they could then (falsely) go back to Julius Caesar, and then Aeneas.
     
  4. Sharwood

    Sharwood Rich, doctor nephew

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    I was under the impression that the French royal line also claimed descent from Troy at one time. Same basic lineage?
     
  5. Dachs

    Dachs Hero of the Soviet Union

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    Possibly, though most of the Byzantine marital connections were with Muscovy and with the Habsburgs of Spain and Austria. I'm not aware of any Capetian claim to be descended from any of the Trojans, though I'm sure Steph knows more.
     
  6. Sharwood

    Sharwood Rich, doctor nephew

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    I only came across it in passing, while reading, of all things, Nostradamus. Apparently, at the time he was writing, the French royal family claimed descent from Troy. Although, considering the other flagrant abuses of history by translators of that text, it could be complete grade-A bullplop.
     
  7. Steph

    Steph Multi Many Tasks man Retired Moderator

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    Just a medieval legend that Paris, son of Priam, gave his name to the Parisi tribe; who in turn gave their name to Paris, the capital city of France...
    It started developping in the 7th century, but it was not limited to France.
    Many European countries tried to claim some origin in Troy, the Greek, or Rome. It was a kind of way to reincorce the legitimacy of the royal line, especially important during the hundred years war, to try to pove that one side would be more rigthfully entitled to their claims than the other. Like the legend that Joseph of Arimathia brought the graal back to England.
     
  8. Sharwood

    Sharwood Rich, doctor nephew

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    Thanks Steph. I've heard the Grail legend, and the one about King Arthur being Ambrosius (sp?), Contantine's son, but never the one about the Parisi.

    Moving onto another question: Who is the longest-reigning monarch in history? I know who ruled the longest in England/Britain, but who has ruled for the longest period of time overall?
     
  9. Dachs

    Dachs Hero of the Soviet Union

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    Pharaoh Pepi II, if my childhood Usborne book of kings and queens is right (and if I remember it): he reigned for 94 years.
     
  10. Mowque

    Mowque Hypermodernist

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    i second what Dachs said


    Question...How good/bad were German colonial practices?
     
  11. Dachs

    Dachs Hero of the Soviet Union

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    About as varied as anybody else's. It ranged from truly horrendous (the Herero genocide in northern Namibia) to not all that bad. The Germans were able to get plenty of askaris in German East Africa (Tanganyika) to fight in the First World War, after all.
     
  12. Sharwood

    Sharwood Rich, doctor nephew

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    They weren't too good at the whole infrastructure part of colonialism though, with the exception of the Ottoman Empire.
     
  13. RedRalph

    RedRalph Deity

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    Is it true that the Romans had a chronic shortage of heavy cavalry, and if so, why?
     
  14. Sharwood

    Sharwood Rich, doctor nephew

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    I've never heard that. I don't think they had a shortage of heavy cavalry, it's simply that the barbarian hordes made better use of theirs. It is commonly recognised that the stirrup gave the Goths a huge advantage over the Romans in warfare. Dachs Moderator Action: Deleted for language. Infraction given. - KD
    Please read the forum rules: http://forums.civfanatics.com/showthread.php?t=422889 doubtless knows more.
     
  15. Dachs

    Dachs Hero of the Soviet Union

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    The Roman heavy cavalry wasn't as good as most other kinds of a comparable period - certainly it couldn't stand up to Parthian cataphract lancers for the first few encounters, in a straight fight - but eventually the Eastern armies of the Romans adopted catafractarii (as they called 'em). The cavalry problem is one of the Republic, not the Empire.

    And the Goths didn't win because of the stirrup that they didn't have. :p At Adrianople, the commonly accepted reason given for the Roman defeat was a deficit of numbers (the Goths actually had near-parity), the ambush that the Tervingi and Greuthungi were able to work, and the Gothic victory over the overextended Roman left wing as it was reaching the Gothic laager earlier in the battle.
     
  16. Dachs

    Dachs Hero of the Soviet Union

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    I hate doubleposting, but I had a question. :(

    Why is there a Masonic symbol on the DDR flag? My parents have one - long story - and when I was little I thought it was the flag of the German Freemasons (cos you know they started out in Bavaria and all and hey I was little). Now that I know it was the DDR flag, I'm just confused.
     
  17. Cheezy the Wiz

    Cheezy the Wiz Socialist In A Hurry

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    Aeneas is the legendary founder of Rome, but he is just that: a legend. What happened was, Virgil decided the Romans needed an epic story of their founding to rival that of the other Mediterranean empires, so he wrote The Aeneid, which is the story of Aeneas leaving Troy after the Trojan War was done, going to Carthage and making mad love to Queen Dido, and then founding Rome. Its a great story, but its all 100% fictional.
     
  18. Agent327

    Agent327 Observer

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    Freemasonry is widely spread in Western society - which has given rise to countless conspiracy theories. For instance Masonic symbols are quite obvious in certain US institutions. As for this particular instance, the GDR flag, I'm oblvivious to the reason.
     
  19. Dachs

    Dachs Hero of the Soviet Union

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    ...but widely believed in classical times, at least halfway. Rome was called in by several cities in the Hellespontine area in the middle days of the Republic because of the perceived link between them and the Trojans. It's older than just Virgil, but just as probably fictional. :)
     
  20. Verbose

    Verbose Deity

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    And it was widely believed all through Medieval Times as well.

    They knew the story of the Trojan war, but didn't really have access to it through Homer's Greek epic (or the Greek tragedies), but everyone read Vergil, identified with the Trojans, and at least according to one Medieval historians I've read, had a collective crush on queen Dido of Carthage.:love:
     
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