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How do you guys avoid "brain overload"?

Discussion in 'Community Patch Project' started by GodDamnItAlexander, Jun 2, 2017.

  1. GodDamnItAlexander

    GodDamnItAlexander Warlord

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2017
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    I guess I could describe the feeling as; "too much information for my brain to handle."
    My first method to deal with this was to play on tiny, but to be frank the game just isn't that fun with only 4 civs.
    So I play on small now, but towards the later stages of the game, especially if I'm a warmongerer, it's just too much for me too handle.

    Between managing the cities, the civilian units, the fighting units, world congress, trading and everything else...
    It really makes it hard for me to finish a game, not because of strategy, but because there's so much to micro-manage.
     
  2. tu_79

    tu_79 Deity

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    Malaga (Spain)
    Chieftain difficulty. It matters not if you fail. First see what's going on. Then play to win. Later increase difficulty. Worked for me.
     
  3. CrazyG

    CrazyG Deity

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    Beijing
    You could try playing a one city challenge. There is a lot less to micromanage and its a very fast game
     
  4. Blue Ghost

    Blue Ghost King

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2016
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    689
    I know what you mean. As awesome as Vox Populi is, the sheer complexity of it is one of its major weaknesses. All the information that needs to be processed can be really daunting, and can diminish enjoyment. Most of the complexity is necessary to achieve the amazing amount of depth the game has, but I'd be on the lookout for ways to simplify the game without sacrificing too much depth.

    As for practical advice, I find that in the later game, while the amount of decisions does increase, the relative importance of those decisions drops drastically. In the early game every point of science and culture matters, but in the late game missing out on a few hundred science barely warrants a blip on the radar. Even on higher difficulties, I rarely feel the need to micromanage every decision for the late game. I let most things run on autopilot and heuristics, taking control only when I feel the need to pivot my overall strategy. And it's worked well enough for me, on Emperor.

    - Build queues in cities. You don't need to evaluate the numerical benefits of every building. Once you have an overall sense of what buildings are the most important, you can use similar build queues for every city, as the needs of different cities don't vary that much.
    - Automate workers. I usually have all my workers automated by the Renaissance era, since by then all the core improvements have been built already, and the order of the peripheral ones doesn't matter that much. I take control of the workers to improve any newly discovered resources, but aside from that, I let them do their own thing.
    - Automated faith purchases. Once the religious battles are done (usually around Medieval/Renaissance), there's no need to micromanage missionaries.
    - For trade routes, the important thing is whether you want to go internal or external. I usually go external on my trade routes. For external trade routes, the city you send them to doesn't have big an impact. Just go for the one that gives the most gold. Check the trade route overview if you're so inclined, but even just sending them from their current city works.
    - Optimizing trade agreements can be tedious, but the stakes are fairly low. Check what agreements you want to make every few turns. You don't need to optimize the best civ to trade with. A suboptimal trade will only cost you a few gold, which is trivial in the late game.
    - There aren't any shortcuts for war, as far as I know. Military units will need to be micromanaged, as the stakes for war are quite high. But keep in mind that in the war game, only your cities closest to the fighting really matter. Just go on developing your other cities as if you were at peace.

    In short, develop heuristics and shortcuts to help with the decisions that don't matter, and focus on the big picture. Major decisions like policy choices, when to go to war, and strategic focus matter a lot more than squeezing every drop of gold out of your trade agreements.

    I hope that helps!
     
    GaiusLukasCäsar and IcyAngel like this.
  5. saamohod

    saamohod King

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    I play with events turned off. Helps my brain a bit without jeopardizing the depth of the game.
     
  6. glider1

    glider1 Deity

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    You are correct, there is actually too much information for your brain to handle. That is what the user interface is supposed to help with. It is the same for everyone, it is just that the good players have played so many games that they have memorised a suite of simple plans that tend to work despite the information wall.

    What about starting a game in different eras, to learn the basic elements of each era without having to go through ancient era first. Then put all the pieces together into a complete playthrough starting in ancient. That way you minimise your workload.
     
  7. GodDamnItAlexander

    GodDamnItAlexander Warlord

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    Not sure this is the solution. I currently play on king as prince is too easy.

    Sure, I want to try this one game. Which civ would you recommend?

    Thanks! I personally found build queues in cities extremely helpful. You just need to pick a few and then you can more or less forget about it for a while.

    I like a bit of randomness in my games, makes it harder but more interesting.

    Great advice!
     
  8. Aldebaran1997

    Aldebaran1997 Prince

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    You know, Civ V is basically brain overloading game as it is. VP added some more elements and lots of text to explain what they do, but those elements have clear purpose and consistency which vanilla doesn't. For example, policy descriptions of Tradition branch are quite long, but they always grant a building has a specialist and yields it supposed to increase to your capital. So, you don't have to read and memory every single one of them, just learn what they want to let you know.
     
  9. CrazyG

    CrazyG Deity

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    Korea or Byzantium

    edit- go for a science victory. this lets you see all the techs, buildings, wonders and units in a fast game with little micromanagement.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2017
  10. ashendashin

    ashendashin King

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    I've always managed to avoid overload with VP for the most part. Started by having so many misconceptions that I only managed to be successful by knowing what my empires overall needs were. Over time I refined my knowledge of what does what, and at this point the only times I have anything like an overload is lategame slogfests, where I just have so much to click at times that I sometimes take a break after maximizing the success of a particular set of turns, and when I get a surprise DoW when I have my units concentrated on certain cities. I usually take a break to decide on the optimal movement of units later, since the AI can be weird about bribed wars sometimes.
     
  11. FoxOfWar

    FoxOfWar Prince

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    Automating workers and using building queues, especially as game progresses, helps a lot. Granted, I tend to automate workers too early instead, but that's another problem. (Occasionally running into the good ol' "Oi! Why are you building roads when I am already in negative income?")

    Also particular city focuses are pretty good, though I tend to micromanage my capita/important production cities. Similarly, keeping most conquered cities as puppets unless you have a good reason for wanting to manage it yourself.

    Queuing techs when the next couple of techs are pretty obvious. Sometimes I go through couple of eras in an entirely shift-queued tech line, usually if I'm already ahead and am just shooting for the next science building or military unit that I want.

    It's hardly ideal, but you can go through most games (well, on King/Emperor where I play, anyway) without starting that many trade deals, as the computer is pretty good at offering you money the instant you have an extra luxury or strategic. Unless you're the Netherlands, anyway.
     
  12. vyyt

    vyyt Deity

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