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i suck at civilization

Discussion in 'Civ4 - General Discussions' started by tipsy09, Aug 12, 2007.

  1. tipsy09

    tipsy09 Chieftain

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    i have been playing this game for years...and i suck so bad...like today i played on settler...and i was gonna get hammered
     
  2. Slobadog

    Slobadog King

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    What do you know. For the first time i actually feel good about being no better than Warlord.
     
  3. Instant_Cereal

    Instant_Cereal Warlord

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    Well, how 'bout posting some questions or saved games of yours so we can see what you're screwing up on. For me, a player who started with Civ1, Civ has always been a trial by error game. You've got to learn from your mistakes and it's all problem-solving.
     
  4. tipsy09

    tipsy09 Chieftain

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    well what should you do when starting a game?

    i always play with Roosevelt...just a preference...until i become good...i will change...

    should i bust out a warrior? worker? work boat? like when i start..i find myself clicking the next turn button constantly...

    when should i produce my settler?

    when should i produce my first worker? should i let the city grow to its max first? before i start producing a worker?

    should i specialize my cities? one military production city? a gold producing city? etc....

    i know about Roosevelt's strenghts...like producing forges, lighthouses, courthouses...etc...

    but i find myself slipping behind in score early in the game...
     
  5. SantaX

    SantaX Chieftain

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    Ah well there a lots of good strategy guides here, myself, i've been playing since civ 1, I never could do the real high levels, but find myself stuck between nobble/prince in civ iv. However, don't be fooled by the score. It is just a number, nothing more. Wanna see that score go up quickly? Start a fight, take over or pillage some cities, you will see that the score is meant as a guideline, nothing more. You can have a great score and loose 20G a turn.

    And what you should build (for me at least) depends on the situation. Try playing with barbarians turned of, so you can concentrate on the AI civs, personnally I find building a barrack (epic speed) with barbs turned of a good start. It gives you a bit of time so the city can grow, after that you can build a warrior or a worker, maybe even a settler :)

    Most important thing for me with this game is trying new things, new strategies and just having fun :)
     
  6. JujuLautre

    JujuLautre Deity

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  7. Antilogic

    Antilogic --

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    There are a lot of good strategy articles around here, and Sisiutil's guide is great for starters (I skimmed through the guides the playtesters wrote right before getting the game to learn some stuff, not sure if it was Sisiutil's, though). I'll just add some general comments on your questions and what I know from learning how to play the game.

    Honestly, I'm not sure the American civ is for beginners. The Americans, Germans, and a few other "late game" Civs that have mostly late-game UUs and UBs, along with traits that are more "obvious" during the late game like Organized, are not the best for beginners. Strategies with these two civs in particular require subtlety and skill early on, because other Civs will gain the advantage on you with their early UUs and UBs. Later in the game, though, the Americans and Germans can shine.

    I would recommend you give a try to a Civ with a Classic-to-Medieval UU and UB, so you don't have to deal with the pressure of rushing an opponent while still having an earlier advantage. Also, pick a couple leaders with traits that are easy to use: Aggressive, Creative, and Financial are three of the easiest traits in the game to utilize. If your cities are getting smashed, add Protective to that list. Hammurabi, with his Aggressive/Organized combo, will be somewhat similar to your current play as Roosevelt with the Organized trait, but the Aggressive trait will boost all your troops in combat and give you extra production on barracks, a vital early-game building. His UU will keep your cities safe early on from enemy axes and swords, and the UB just gives extra health and happiness at Construction, when your cities are starting to get large. Hammurabi is probably one of the best "starter" leaders. I'm certain others can give you recommendations/recollections of first Civs as well.

    Early game, you will be smashing "next turn" constantly while you explore with your starting unit, because you don't have a lot to do until you start getting more units and cities.

    On your early builds...well, I'm not even all that clear on that. If I can hook up an early food resource, like corn or wheat, then I will typically produce another warrior to guard my city, and a worker to farm that resource. If not, then I might go for a warrior then strait to settler. In any case, I'll get a settler ready to go out and build a second city. Typically, I have at least two cities by ~2600 BCE (going from memory, so that's give or take a couple centuries), to give you a hard date. Always guard your settler as he leaves your borders so he doesn't get eaten by wild animals--if that happens, you are seriously screwed. After that, I try to have either the Bronze Working or Archery techs ready so that I can build a barracks with a chopped forest (to speed production) and start producing good troops. I'll typically produce settlers when my early cities are at size 2 or 3, no later. After I get a few cities going, then I'll start building up.

    All this depends on the map, of course. I typically wait on work boats, but if I have three fish off my coast and no good food resources on the land, I'll consider going for the fish instead. Seeing a starting save is really helpful here.

    Also, on the issue of specialization: YES, YES, YES! I cannot stress this enough--previous versions of Civ rewarded generalization, and having a lot of well-rounded cities with maybe one specialized city was a good strategy to follow. In Civ4, there are a lot more buildings and terrain improvements, so you need to pick them carefully for each city. A good production city for military units will have some good grassland/floodplains near rivers or lakes for farming, and some hills for mining. A good commerce city has a lot of flat land for cottages (cottage-based economies are easier to learn than specialist economies, so for your first games, build cottages in cities with a lot of space!). Of course, special resources like iron and copper make for good production cities, and luxuries like dyes and silks make for good commerce cities.

    Show us a screenshot! :D
     
  8. tipsy09

    tipsy09 Chieftain

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    thanks alot guys...helps alot..really appreciate it...
     
  9. tipsy09

    tipsy09 Chieftain

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    should you put a library, or forge, courthouse in every city? are there some buildings that you have to put in every city...and some buildings that are unnecessary to put in every city?

    like later one...is it necessary to put an obervstaory or university or bank in every city?
     
  10. tipsy09

    tipsy09 Chieftain

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    for example...what do you produce instead of building an unnecessary building? just produce research or something?

    like if your city is commerce city, and you have the option of producing an unnecessary building like a barracks, what do you produce instead, a military unit or research?

    or what if you want to produce a wonder that can be used in another city? you just wait? because that wonder can be taken by another civilization...you know what I mean?

    or is going crazy on wonders a bad idea...are there unnecessary wonders also? I tend to build many wonders...
     
  11. mnf

    mnf King

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    I like the guides in the Strategy Articles forum. But I think the Succession Games are much better for beginners. It's fun to read and actually seeing people applying the strategies is much better than just reading the guidelines and theories.

    Why not try read one or two succession games? You'll be surprised how much you can remember. Sometimes just an innocent looking remark by one of the players could actually be something big for you.
     
  12. tipsy09

    tipsy09 Chieftain

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    succession games?
     
  13. Spearthrower

    Spearthrower Thrower of spears

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    I'd say 95% of the time I put a library, market, courthouse and even a forge (for the engineer specialist) in every city eventually..... these "tier 1" buildings help any city produce a basic amount of stuff that allows you to have some degree over customising it later when you have a better idea of your empire as a whole.

    Observatories, Banks and Universities and other "tier 2" and "tier3" buildings are more specialised and expensive. You wont be able to build all of these in every city, and why would you want to? If you look at what they do (+% science for example) then just go check the output of the city in question..... does +20% science actually mean anything compared to the beaker output of the city?

    Learn to identify specialised city spots, then dont waste time building unnecessary infrastructure in that specialist city.

    For example, you always need a strong production city for troops. You need to identify a place with plenty of hammers (likely to be hills for mines) and enough food to work all those tiles. This city does not need cottages, the economy of your other cities can support the costs of this city. Place the city, get a forge, courthouse, barracks and then crank troops until you need happiness or health and build a corresponding building before going back to cranking troops.

    Try to identify likely spots in the early game for: 1 - 2 production cities, 1 Great Person farm, 1 super science city and let the other cities be more generalised, but make sure they have a decent amount of cottages.
     
  14. tipsy09

    tipsy09 Chieftain

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    thanks alot...and another thing...should your capital be a general city? and not specialized?

    what do you people usually do for your capitals?

    you're supposed to plant your capital on the first turn, right?
     
  15. Spearthrower

    Spearthrower Thrower of spears

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    If you are planning to run Bureaucracy, then your capital is going to be the focus for a lot of gold and hammers.

    However, in BtS I have noticed that capitals nearly always have a lot of excess food now, so I tend to make them my GP city then move my palace to a more appropriate spot later.

    Plant your capital on the first turn - when you are more confident with winning, then you might consider moving based on what you see at the start of the game. As it is, just settle on the spot! ;)
     
  16. Antilogic

    Antilogic --

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    I tend to put forges and courthouses in all my cities, simply to reduce maintenance and increase production (whether they are making military units or commerce buildings, more hammers is better). I almost never "waste" production on research or gold--I'm building units or new buildings. Or making missionaries or spies. If you are going to produce military units, make sure you make a barracks first, otherwise you'll have troops with lower experience levels that won't be as strong in combat.

    On banks, universities, observatories, drydocks, and other "tier 2+" buildings--only if a city needs it for its primary purpose, and if not, then it'll be passed over for the time being. I might install them eventually (say, to get the minimum number of banks and universities together to build Wall Street or Oxford, important national wonders for your specialized cities), but not if I'm planning a war or I have something else going on.

    In my military production cities, I will only put in a market or a grocer if I am close to the health/happiness cap and those buildings will help. That's another key thing about buildings: if you have a health cap of 15, and your city currently has 8 unhealthiness, do not start building an aqueduct. Or, say you have 9 happiness and only 5 unhappiness--don't start on a colosseum. Only build the buildings to expand your population capacity for health and happiness when you need them. Otherwise, focus on other more pressing matters.
     
  17. tipsy09

    tipsy09 Chieftain

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    GP as in great person?

    and should you always put your cities where the game recommends? in the blue circle..or it doesnt really matter...

    like i usually like to put cities just outside the fat-cross of the neighbouring city...
     
  18. Antilogic

    Antilogic --

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    The game normally tries to give you a "good" location with a couple resources for your capital, so I tend to settle on the spot. Additionally, there is some guarantee that within so many tiles of your capital (4 or 5, I think), you will have an early strategic resource: horses, copper, or iron. Moving away from the predetermined spot may cause you to move further away from these vital resources, so I tend to settle on the spot (again). Also, the earlier you are producing commerce and hammers, the quicker you can send out more troops and settlers. If there is a good site within a move (say, to a plains hill that will give your city center 2 hammers instead of 1), then I'll move. But that's about it.
     
  19. Antilogic

    Antilogic --

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    GP refers to great person, normally, unless you are referring to a great prophet. Typically, though, it refers to great people in general.

    The blue circles are what the game calculates as good positions, but I don't always agree with them. I tend to overlap only a few tiles if I can, and if you always settle just outside the city radius, then you might get a lot of overlap. I tend to go for 1-4 tiles overlap, only less if I'm filling in a good coastal site or there are enough resources to split between the two. You'll develop your own system as you gain experience...mine's hard to describe. I just kind of look at the map and pick spots, and sometimes they line up with the blue circles, and sometimes they don't.

    The blue circles are what the AI would settle if they were playing your position, to clarify what they are.
     
  20. tipsy09

    tipsy09 Chieftain

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    do more (unnecessary) buildings and units add to the maintanance of your civ?

    and which city would great library and/or oxford go?
     

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