It is on internet, therefore it must be true

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Steph, Oct 23, 2009.

  1. Cheezy the Wiz

    Cheezy the Wiz Socialist In A Hurry

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2005
    Messages:
    25,238
    Location:
    Freedonia
    Victorian literature has done a lot to hurt popular understanding of history. Already mentioned is the Robin Hood phenomenon. But also The Fantastic Voyages of Christopher Columbus has led to the popular idea that people back then though the world was flat and that CC would sail off the edge of it if he went West. In fact, the dispute among his potential funders was just how big the (round) world was, and if it was feasible to actually cross all the way to India or if they'd get lost or all starve or something along the way.
     
  2. Bugfatty300

    Bugfatty300 Buddha Squirrel

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2003
    Messages:
    10,352
    Location:
    Mexico
    I personally like the crazy phantom time theories that propose that the early middle ages never existed and that Charlemagne and his dynasty was the same person as Julius Ceasar and his decedents or something like that.
     
  3. SS-18 ICBM

    SS-18 ICBM Oscillator

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2006
    Messages:
    15,268
    Location:
    Here and there
    There's stuff on the Internet that may not be true? Alert the presses.
     
  4. Dachs

    Dachs Hero of the Soviet Union

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    32,588
    Location:
    Moscow
    The Baktrian historian, upon reading the offhand comment, dejectedly lowered his head, muttering all the while: "Oh, it's true! it's all true!"

    Considering how often a historian of Baktria has to look through obscure Indian texts, some of which are almost certainly fiction, to back up an already thin framework based on coinage and a couple of ruins, it's truly shocking we know as much as we do. (Or that we think we know as much as we do.) One of the foundations for the view that the Baktrians captured Pataliputra, the capital of the Mauryan Empire, is a line in an Indian grammar book that children were supposed to practice, which references a Yonaka siege of the place. Hell, one of the only literary references to Demetrios Aniketos is in Chaucer, for Pete's sake:
    Of course, we have other reasons to believe he existed, too. Like coins, and a few disparate literary references. But still. :(
    Yeah. In the case of the Trojan War, though, it's a good idea not to go too far. Schliemann and his 'Treasury of Atreus', his 'Priam's Gold'...I mean, "I have looked upon the face of Agamemnon" makes good copy, but there was basically no basis for referring to the death-mask as his!
    :love: Last Thursdayism!
     
  5. The Last Conformist

    The Last Conformist Irresistibly Attractive

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2001
    Messages:
    27,779
    Location:
    Not on your side
    Bah.

    All the cool kids now subscribe to Next Thursdayism, the doctrine that the world will be created next Thursday, complete with fake geological strata etc, and what you think you are expriencing right now is nothing but the fake memories of some guy next week.
     
  6. MagisterCultuum

    MagisterCultuum Great Sage

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    16,422
    Location:
    Kael's head
    Yes, and some of those who refused to fund him actually argued that he would probably run into another continent on the way and have too much difficulty navigating around it. Most of the educated elites in Europe knew better than to trust Columbus's preferred Ptolemaic model.


    There is also some evidence that the medieval Norse expeditions to North America did not end completely, but just became less common. The first natives found in a certain area near Newfoundland were in possession of several European artifacts, including those bearing the mark of some known Italian manufacturers. This tribe is also noteworthy for not letting Europeans land, insisting that insisting on using ropes to pass trade items to and from the ships while still at sea, thus preventing the kind of contact that spread deadly European diseases to less careful tribes.


    Also, it seems the first map to call the new world America significantly predated Amerigo Vespucci. It seems the continents were instead named for Richard Ameryk, the chief financial backer of John Cabot. His name was also found on documents proving that Newfoundland had been (re)discovered in 1479 (13 years before Columbus's voyage), and that many of Columbus's prospective backers knew about it.
     
  7. TheLastOne36

    TheLastOne36 Deity

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2007
    Messages:
    14,045
    I think it has became well known as of late that Scandinavians frequently visited Greenland long after the initial settlement collapsed to cut and collect wood.
     
  8. gangleri2001

    gangleri2001 Garbage day!!!

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Messages:
    3,954
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Caldes de Montbui, Großkatalonien
    Totally agree. I've been reading the post of french yahoo answers Steph mentioned and there's people who actually belive that the kingdom of Malandar existed!!!

    For those who can understand french, here you got the link:

    http://fr.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070218125122AAv6pes

    :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:
     
  9. The Last Conformist

    The Last Conformist Irresistibly Attractive

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2001
    Messages:
    27,779
    Location:
    Not on your side
    I think you are slightly confused - Scandinavians from Greenland made later expeditions to "Vinland" to collect wood, but nobody would travel to Greenland for the same purpose, the place being essentially treeless.
     
  10. Counterclaw

    Counterclaw Prince

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    440
    I guess I find it more amusing that worrying. The world is full of misinformation. It's in textbooks, newspapers, games, movies, you name it. But it's sort of cool that your game was popular enough to become part of someone's "reality."
     
  11. TheLastOne36

    TheLastOne36 Deity

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2007
    Messages:
    14,045
    Sorry, I meant Vinland, not Greenland. :lol:
     
  12. Elta

    Elta 我不会把这种

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2005
    Messages:
    7,590
    Location:
    North Vegas
    :cringe:

    That's all I can say.
     
  13. Steph

    Steph Multi Many Tasks man Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2002
    Messages:
    18,162
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Pont de l'Arn, FRANCE
    It's even worse that that. Some people transformed "She was a young woman living 5 centuries ago" into "living in the 16th century".

    No one doubted the existence of Malandar, nor was surprised with the appearance of Amazons in the story!
     
  14. Aleenik

    Aleenik Deity

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    Messages:
    2,203
    Location:
    France
    I agree. For example, last night I had to find the inventor of a few different things and the year they where first made. It was like one thing said something than another thing said something else. Needles to say, when I sent in the assignment I had no clue if I choose the right people and dates for the inventions.
     
  15. jessiecat

    jessiecat Divine Monarch

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2007
    Messages:
    4,405
    Location:
    Cornwall, somewhere near England
    It's been understood for centuries that Shakespeare wrote historical plays on behalf of his royal paymasters to give their own slant on history. And that historians of every stripe have recorded facts to suit their thesis. So why is it a surprise that the internet can be used to create the illusion of fact from pure fantasy? Is it any different from marketing or advertising? We live in a world of illusion, "smoke and mirrors", as somebody said.;)
     
  16. Steph

    Steph Multi Many Tasks man Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2002
    Messages:
    18,162
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Pont de l'Arn, FRANCE
    I wonder what would happen if I create a false wikipedia entry for her.
     
  17. jessiecat

    jessiecat Divine Monarch

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2007
    Messages:
    4,405
    Location:
    Cornwall, somewhere near England
    If wikipedia is any good at all, one of their editors should check for corroberation. Can you fabricate a back-up source on Google as well? That would be really interesting if they quoted 2 false sources.
     
  18. Valka D'Ur

    Valka D'Ur Hosting Iron Pen in A&E Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2005
    Messages:
    26,311
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Red Deer, Alberta, Canada
    Getting more correct, but still not quite...

    Vinland was named that because they found grapes (or some sort of fruit suitable for making wine). The area where they found all those lovely trees they intended to cut and take back to Greenland (which wasn't very green and was indeed nearly treeless by that time) was called "Markland."

    The aboriginal inhabitants of Newfoundland were the Beothuks. Sadly, those people are now extinct. They had a violent run-in with some of the people from Leif Eriksson's voyage, so would naturally be a lot more cautious if they encountered any Europeans after that.

    I think you have an excellent imagination, but if you were to do such a thing I would lose all respect for you. The archaeologist/historian in me shudders at the thought of deliberately posting false information on Wikipedia. :nono:
     
  19. Gelion

    Gelion Captain

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    12,111
    Location:
    Earth Dome
  20. gangleri2001

    gangleri2001 Garbage day!!!

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Messages:
    3,954
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Caldes de Montbui, Großkatalonien
    Wrong. There you can clearly see that the user Vaetuva is the only one who realized that it was a fictional character from a fictional story. On the amazons, I'd say that no one actually read the whole story (neither did I).
     

Share This Page