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Mexico Forever: A DOC Game

Discussion in 'Civ4 - Stories & Tales' started by Lokki242, Apr 3, 2017.

  1. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Secretario

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    1854 Election: Results
    Egalitarian Party: 2 (66%)
    Benito Juarez: 2 (100%)
    Liberal Conservative Alliance: 1 (34%)
    Porfirio Diaz: 1 (100%)

    President Benito Juarez brings the vote to all the men of Mexico!
    Spoiler :

    In a surprising turn, the political landscape of Mexico has been completely altered. After eighteen years under the rule of the Moderate National Party, the radical candidates Benito Juarez and Porfirio Diaz swept up most of their votes in the election, with Juarez seizing the presidency. President Juarez has immediately set about fulfilling his egalitarian platform, pressing the Fifth Amendment into law, which granted all male Mexican citizens over 17 the right to vote or hold political/military positions, shortly after assuming office. He has expressed his desire not only to add an additional amendment granting female suffrage in the near future, but to prepare and deliver a Third Constitution before his term has ended.
     
  2. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Secretario

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    1854-1860: ...And Justice for All
    President Benito Juarez, shortly after beginning his term, soon began funding money away from "unnecessary" research, instead turning it to social programs and government projects to improve the quality of life for all Mexican people.
    Spoiler :

    Development was turned away from progressing towards Mexican rail, with the nation's greatest thinkers turning their attention to finding new social programs and political systems to help promote equality and welfare. The German writer Karl Marx in particular played a large part in the development of such ideals.
    Spoiler :

    Following through on more promises to bring freedom to all Mexican citizens, the Republic of Mali was granted official autonomy by President Juarez on Christmas Day, 1854. Though a military alliance was maintained between the two nations, many Moderates and Conservatives were outraged, seeing Juarez's actions as a betrayal to the nations security. Additionally, the ARM California was also given over to a Mali crew as a show of good faith.
    Spoiler :

    Spoiler :

    As part of his egalitarian policies, some funding had been cut from the administration of Dakota due to their traditional oppression of native groups in the area. This treatment, alongside the state being strong supporters of Diaz in the election, led to the city of Grand Forks being swamped with rioting for much of the months following Juarez's victory.
    Spoiler :

    Despite President Juarez's opposition to expansionism, seeing it as an oppressive, imperialist practice, the colonization efforts begun by Ignacio Comonfort were allowed to continue, or risk losing the money spent. Several islands populated by Polynesian groups were settled by Mexican colonists, the most notable being Hawai'i and Guadalupe, which hoped to see large tropical agriculture become their major industries.
    Spoiler :

    Spoiler :

    Hoping to continue to build unity between Mexicans of all classes and races, President Juarez funded the production of a large bronze statue in the Los Angeles harbor, to greet the many new faces often arriving in Mexican through Californian ports. The Statue of Liberty would represent the determination and free spirit common to all Mexicans, and serve as an inspiration to the people of the nation. Critics, however, have questioned how spending money on a massive statue truly helps the cause of equal rights for the people of Mexico.
    Spoiler :

    In an effort to keep Mexico's resources in their own sphere and economy, the President declined to reopen some longstanding trade deals with the French, as well as other world powers.
    Spoiler :

    In late 1856, Comonfort's National Gallery in Santa Fe was completed. The site would become a major tourist attraction and pinnacle of art, not only collecting Mexican culture, but history as well.
    Spoiler :

    During the winter of 1857, a devastating flu began to spread throughout Europe, similar to the bubonic plague of many centuries prior. Though quarantine efforts were put in place to stop it reaching Mexico, the vast nature of trade networks and international contact meant the infection's spread would be inevitable.
    Spoiler :

    The disease soon struck the major ports in Guatemala, beginning to tear through the slums in the area, which were majorly populated by labourers who still identified as Spanish rather than Mexican. As the death toll began to rise, Juarez funded various health programs to counter the illnesses, including easily available clean water and cleaner living conditions.
    Spoiler :

    Economists soon published their analysis of the strongest economies in the world. Despite the high influx of income Mexico received, the high government spending prevented the nation from being included on the list of wealthiest powers.
    Spoiler :

    On September 16, 1858, Benito Juarez revealed his Third Constitution. The new and carefully structured document once again pushed a more representative voting system, but included additional, essential changes. Additional statues granted suffrage to all Mexican women over the age of 17, bringing the vote to all adults of the nation, and banned politicians from public endorsement or involvement with any religious organization. The Constitution was received quite warmly, due to the wave of popularity Juarez received through his efforts to combat the plague and the rising activity of the lower/middle classes in politics, partially brought about by Juarez's inclusive nature.
    Spoiler :

    Not long after the Third Constitution came into effect, Cabrillo became subject to many bandit raids. The rurales patrols in Colorado had long since diminished, leading the sprawling area and its neighbours ripe for exploitation by criminals. Many of the rice farms outside of Sacramento, manned primarily by Japanese immigrant workers, were subject to raids taking both money and food. Juarez refused to bend to ransom demands by the outlaws and potentially encourage further banditry, and instead ordered the Mexican military to attack and capture all perpetrators, then execute them for their crimes. President Juarez, a hero to many of the downtrodden, had shown his sterner side.
    Spoiler :

    Thanks to the tireless efforts of the Egalitarian government, the plague's effects on Mexico were minimal, and the disease soon disappeared almost completely.
    Spoiler :

    On June 5, 1860, the Governor of California, Andres Pico, unveiled the completely Statue of Liberty, which had been funded by Juarez's considerable surplus. The President's term, peaceful but trans-formative, would soon reach its end with the upcoming election. With a much larger voter base than ever before, the results are difficult to predict.

    Benito Juarez also has the unique distinction of thus far being the only Mexican President to serve a complete term without the nation being in any state of war.
    Spoiler :
     
  3. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Secretario

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    1860 Election
    President Juarez, with his goals of egalitarianism accomplished, has renamed his party as the Reform Party, to better reflect the future changes he hopes to bring to Mexico.

    Moderate National Party
    Supports freedom in the economy. Desires slightly large government that protects national rather than personal interests. Emphasis on meeting regionalist, rather than federalist, needs. Highly nationalist, with a focus on liberating formerly European colonies. Promotes the freedom of all men. Supports expansionism, but with peaceful assimilation of local native cultures.
    Spoiler :
    Pio de Jesus Pico (age 59)
    Spoiler :
    Former President. Former Governor of California. Famously ugly, but beloved by his employees and most Californians. Wealthy but kind landowner, entrepreneur and rancher. Declare Galiano a state, rather than a territory, and end the territorial system. Promote the gambling industry. Build a Catholic Cathedral in Los Angeles as a symbol for the Mexican people. Raise research spending, and continue to expand Mexico’s vast trade network. Begin to settle more of the North American interior. Launch a naval tour to show off Mexico's growing scope to the rest of the world powers.

    Spoiler :
    Ignacio Comonfort (age 48)
    Spoiler :
    Former President. Lieutenant Colonel in Civil War known for killing Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Continue to heavily settle the Pacific, and then move on to Australia. Pressure India into opening trade with Mexico. Work tirelessly to develop the technology necessary to construct a national railroad by raising research spending. Make the Executive Cabinet positions elected offices, from within the ruling party. Declare war on Spain in an effort to liberate the last of their colonies in the Americas.

    Liberal Conservative Alliance
    A party formed from the merger between the Old Liberal and Conservative parties. It has lost the pro-European nature of the Conservatives and the secularism of the Liberals. The Alliance is protectionist and will do whatever it takes to grow the Mexican economy above all others, favouring wealth over nationality. A strong military is key to their platform, as is a firm international presence like those of many European powers. Supports a strong executive branch.
    Spoiler :
    Juan Almonte (age 56)
    Spoiler :
    Former Conservative, but Republican Colonel in the Civil War. Took part in the Conquest of Bridgeport before retiring from the military. Wants to break alliance with the United States and declare war as retribution for the uprisings in Dakota. Force non-compliant native groups to assimilate, and meet refusal harshly. Strong supporter of expanding the influence of Catholicism in Mexican lives. Make infantry the focus of the Mexican army, rather than cavalry. Open a defensive pact with the United Kingdom, and pursue more with other European powers.

    Spoiler :
    Porfirio Diaz (age 30)
    Spoiler :
    Former young Colonel in the Mexican army, serving since age 14. Ambitious. Boasts a shrewd tactical mind and compelling presence, despite his youth. Wants to completely change the Liberal Conservative Alliance to be a party for the Mexican people, then reform the electoral system. Continue to expand free trade, using foreign investment as a stimulus, though under heavy scrutiny. Reform the Mexican Army to be a modern and efficient career path, rather than a bureaucracy. Charge politicians who express a desire to take away freedoms from Mexican people with treason. Make science the most important tool of a strong Mexican government, including an increase in research spending. Restrict the vote to those who are currently employed, and require politicians to have a military service record.

    Mexican Reform Party
    A party founded on the principle of bringing the vote to all citizens, regardless of race or sex. Endorses social programs that help create a better educated, more stable Mexican society. Inspired by socialist principles, but hopes to make them work within an industrialized free market environment. Work to eliminate poverty and racism. Isolationist and protectionist.
    Spoiler :
    Benito Juarez (age 54)
    Spoiler :
    Incumbent President. Former Liberal and Moderate National, member of parliament for over fifteen years. Incredible orator. Believes both opposing parties are broken, and do not represent the average Mexican. End social segregation. Encourage stronger relationships with Asian powers, and promote immigration. Close down some trade deals once they expire. Switch research to other political systems. Cut research spending to afford social programs and infrastructure. End settlement of unclaimed territory. Continue to develop the relationship between the Mexican government and native bands as one of respect, to make them feel like a part of the nation.

     
  4. Bautos42

    Bautos42 Chieftain

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    I vote once again for Benito Juarez.
    Sorry for the delay, I missed the update to the storry until now.
     
  5. Glorious Leader

    Glorious Leader Chieftain

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    Sorry I was gone for a while, but I also vote Benito Juarez.
     
  6. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Secretario

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    Hey, welcome back, and no worries. I don't mind the extra time, since I'm a little swamped (hence the slowdown on my own posts).
     
  7. A.Caesar

    A.Caesar Chieftain

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    I'll go with Benito Juarez too
     
  8. ChineseWarlord

    ChineseWarlord Chieftain

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    Why should you care?
    Benito Juarez will knock this election out of the park.
     
  9. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Secretario

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    There's a part of me that wants to vote Diaz to avoid a unanimous vote, but... come on, Benito Juarez is awesome.
    Before the *mysterious* election results are posted, however, I do have a special little post coming in honor of Mexico's 50th anniversary.
     
    A.Caesar likes this.
  10. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Secretario

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    The Founding Fathers: Mexico's Fiftieth Anniversary

    In commemoration of fifty years of Mexican independence on September 16, 1860, the Juarez government has placed heavy significance on the study of founding fathers; the men who made Mexico possible.

    Don Miguel Hidalgo (May 8, 1753-June 14, 1822, age 69)
    Spoiler :

    Don Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla was the true father of Mexican independence, as well as a Catholic priest and former professor. It was Don Hidalgo that rallied the people of Mexico together to throw off the chains of Spanish oppression, after years of watching them suffer. Nearly a hundred thousand peasants rallied behind his cry, followed by many other leaders and soldiers. Hidalgo was the first man to enter the governor’s palace in Mexico City following its capture, and led the negotiations with King Alphonse, following a firm but fair stance. Following independence, the Don continued to play an active role in Mexican politics as leader of the Popular Catholic Party, advising caution and unity for the nation. His death on June 14, 1822, was a day of mourning for the entire nation, and went on to become a national holiday celebrating Mexican founding fathers.

    Ignacio Allende (January 21, 1769-February 9, 1825, age 56)
    Spoiler :

    Ignacio Allende, like many of the leaders of the rebellion, was an active member of the Spanish Army when the conflict began, and a career soldier. He was also one of the few criollos (Spanish whites born in Mexico) to have such a high level esteem in the nation. What made him unique was the amount of power he held within the Spanish hierarchy; Allende was a captain, signifying his tactical expertise and investment in the current system. Yet he threw it all away to help the people of Mexico find their freedom. Ignacio Allende helped organize the many troops that stormed Mexico City, and maintained the new nation’s security before terms with Spain had been established. Ignacio played a large role in Mexican politics all the way up to his death, leading the Conservative party and strong-arming himself into the Minister of War office under President Victoria. Operating as a general for much for much of his political career, his aggressive tactics broke down the defences of many enemy armies in early conflicts and the Mexican-American war. Despite his ambitious nature and dedication to a strong Mexico, his inability to swiftly end the Surprise War would crush his limited popularity shortly before his death.

    Mariano Matamoros (August 14, 1770-January 1, 1811, age 41)
    Spoiler :

    Mariano Matamoros is one of the few soldiers who fought for a free Mexico that did not live to see it fully realized. A Catholic priest and close associate of Don Hidalgo, Matamoros stood by his friend’s side as the revolution began. Matamoros had a closer relationship with many of the Mexican-born landowners who looked down on Hidalgo’s peasant following, and was thusly able to convince many of them to make common cause for an independent nation. Matamoros had limited military experience, and it was this that led to his fate. Before King Philip could be deposed, Matamoros led a cavalry division to secure a Mexican safe-zone, where he was captured and eventually executed by Royalist forces, only a few weeks before a peaceful transition would be established.

    Agustin de Iturbide (September 27, 1783-July 18, 1858, age 75)
    Spoiler :

    Before the struggle for independence began, Agustin de Iturbide was a Lieutenant in the Spanish Army, descended from a noble family back in Europe. Despite his technical status as a criollo, he was well-liked within political circles, with rumors of a potential governorship to eventually come his way. It was his status deep within the system that initially held Iturbide in opposition to independence, believing it would only create a weak, fragmented Mexican nation and cause the collapse of the Spanish empire. As his troops toured the countryside amidst the rise of nationalist sentiment, his view changed. The suffering of the Mexican people, particularly those without criollo status as non-whites, moved Iturbide to switch sides, making contact with Ignacio Allende and Vicente Guerrero. It was Iturbide’s loyal soldiers and knowledge of Spanish tactics he brought to the table that allowed the Mexican Army to seize control of the regional capital, which decisively turned the conflict in Mexican favor. Following the official peace made with King Alfonse, Iturbide still worried for Mexico’s future as a fledgling state without the population or production of the United States. Hoping to build a strong state, Iturbide advocated for a continuation of positive relations with the Spanish Empire, as well as a Mexican monarchy, ensuring a head of state with complete power. The other politicians competing for election did not agree with Iturbide’s views: Guerrero, and Guadalupe Victoria (who would win the election) were particularly insulted. Following Victoria’s ascension to the presidency, he exiled Iturbide for his “traitorous and opportunistic” beliefs. Many Mexicans supported him, now believing Agustin had only helped the cause to further his own station. Iturbide would flee to Paris, then London and finally New York, where he would eventually pass away. President Benito Juarez gave him a posthumous pardon shortly after his death, and Iturbide’s family soon returned home to Mexico, their exile ended.

    Vicente Guerrero (August 10, 1782-April 23, 1850, age 68)
    Spoiler :

    Vicente Guerrero’s race left him at the bottom of Mexican social class: quarter African, quarter native and half Filipino, with no caucasian ancestry to be found. Under Spanish rule, this meant he was worth very little, yet his meteoric rise as a Mexican hero is legendary. Guerrero was a relentless soldier who led much of the Mexican Army that was outside Ignacio Allende’s jurisdiction, earning him a position at the peace negotiations with the Spanish Crown, despite his opposition to ending the conflict. Throughout his entire political career, Guerrero would call for the liberation of trodden peoples, the end of racism, and the fall of empire, particularly Spain. These views, alongside his dismissal as Minister of War to be replaced with Allende, led to his departure from the Liberal party and the founding of the Moderate Nationals. He soon became Mexico’s second President; the first person of colour to ever be democratically elected to head of state in recorded history. Though he would only serve one term, Guerrero would continue to play a majorly active role in politics and warfare for the rest of his career, contributing to Mexico’s victory in the Surprise and Opium Wars, as well as the Republican victory in the Civil War. Despite being neglected and dismissed by his peers, Guerrero carved a legacy for himself that all Mexicans will remember.

    Guadalupe Victoria (September 29, 1786-October 3, 1841, age 55)
    Spoiler :

    While Don Hidalgo is the father of Mexico’s revolution, some would say Guadalupe Victoria is the father of the Mexican nation. A lawyer and veteran of the Spanish Army, Victoria served beneath Guerrero and Allende in the newly formed Mexican army. It was his sharp political mind that gave him rise to prominence. Victoria pushed himself into the negotiations with the Spanish Crown, pushing hard to ensure the best possible result for the people of Mexico. Shortly after that, he was the lead author of the First Mexican Constitution, which no doubt contributed to his victory in the first general elections, making him Mexico’s first President. He would remain President for the next twelve years, helping shape the nation Mexico would become. His decisive victory over the United States ensured Mexico would be the dominant power over the North American continent, and the nation’s living conditions were greatly improved through government programs. Slavery was also made illegal under his regime, helping the many downtrodden minorities of the nation. Though the Surprise War would turn poor quickly, costing Victoria his position, he would advise the more radical liberals for many years to come. Victoria’s policies of secularization, though how they were enforced would zig-zag, played a major role in building a more unified, egalitarian Mexico. Victoria passed away before his time due to an epileptic condition amidst the Mexican Civil War, and was mourned across the nation.

    Martin Javier Mina (July 1, 1789-January 18, 1847, age 58)
    Spoiler :

    Despite serving in the Mexican cabinet for almost thirty years, Martin Javier Mina is often overlooked as a founding member of the Mexican state. Mina was young when the fight for independence began and, despite being an active participant, did not hold the sway other leaders of the revolution did. Despite several unsuccessful bids for the Presidency, Mina never held elected office. It was his impact on policy while serving as Minister of Justice, or Foreign Affairs, or the Interior that allowed him to leave a lasting impact on the Mexican state. Unlike the big, intense personalities of Guadalupe Victoria, Vicente Guerrero and Santa Anna, Mina often presented a more calm, rationalized point of view that tempered his contemporaries’ fires. Many of Mexico’s most effective laws, policies and behaviours can be traced back to Martin Javier Mina making him a small, but unforgettable part of the national legacy.
     
  11. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Secretario

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    1860 Election: Results
    Reform Party: 5 (100%)
    Juarez: 5 (100%)

    President Benito Juarez wins election with shocking amount of support!
    Spoiler :

    Benito Juarez has broken records with the 1860 Mexican General Election, appearing to have won the majority of votes in every riding. This, coupled with extreme success with in terms of winning seats for the Reform Party in Congress, has given President Juarez almost complete control over the Mexican government. Government policy is now exclusively focused on the equality between all citizens. Mexico has truly become a home of the free.
    Spoiler :
     
  12. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Secretario

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    1860-1866: What Grows, Prospers
    Though many celebrated the official "end" of racism in Mexican politics, more conservative politicians were outraged, using excuses to justify their prejudices. In protest, they slowed down their cooperation with Juarez's leadership on the federal and state levels, preventing the government from accomplishing much over the next two years as it tore down its opposition.
    Spoiler :

    Within a few months of the government freeze, the riots in Grand Forks reignited. Both American and Mexicans rose up, taking out their frustrations and the lack of support from their local government.
    Spoiler :

    By January, 1862, the government freeze ended, and Mexico returned to operating under business as usual. After two years of no progress, President Juarez could finally pursue the goals he had intended to pursue upon his election.
    Spoiler :

    Unexpectedly, pressure came from the Orient. A Korean delegation, under pressure from their Chinese overseers, demanded that the Mexican Republic end its trade with Japan, which was taking up some of the market other East Asian nations could fill. Juarez, supporting equal opportunity in terms of trade, refused the request, and was met with hot air in response.
    Spoiler :

    Hoping to control the treatment and regulations of various trades, as well as boost the government income, President Juarez soon set about nationalizing the colonial industries of Mexico. The process of buying out corporations from greedy merchants would take some time, made only worse by further outrage back home, this time from the Moderate Nationals who strongly supported a free, laissez-faire economy. Pio de Jesus Pico, former President and architect of Mexico's trade networks, publicly decried Juarez in Congress for his "money-grubbing" and "oppressions in the name of freedoms".
    Spoiler :

    The completion of a large levee system in the rivers surrounding Santa Fe gave the city complete control over water flow and flooding, helping provide large amounts of water to steam-based and other industries. This was soon followed with the opening of construction of the New Mexico University, the first of its kind in Mexico, and focused on trades and hard, applicable sciences. The city was truly becoming a core part of the Mexican nation.
    Spoiler :

    Spoiler :

    During a trade negotiation during the Dutch, the patronizing behaviour and expectant nature of the foreign delegation rubbed President Juarez the wrong way. In a spur of the moment decision, he cancelled the cotton trade between Mexico and the Netherlands, citing the awful labour treatment created by intense pressure to reach such international demand. The President then left before the shocked diplomats and merchants from the Lower Countries could respond.
    Spoiler :

    The fishing industry in the Pacific around Galiano and Estrechos Fuca quickly began to grow in 1863, leading to rapid population boom for the state.
    Spoiler :

    In the Philippines, a new religion was rapidly becoming popularized. Chinese and Japanese immigrants to the islands brought Buddhism with them, and many locals began to convert en masse. This led to tension with the prevalent Catholic population already dominant in the region, leading to regular unrest and conflict that local administration could do little to amend.
    Spoiler :

    By 1864, the Mexican Republic was no longer alone as a colonizer of the Pacific; American settlements had quickly begun to spring up in various island chains, seeking luxuries and strategic advantage.
    Spoiler :

    Around this time, the cities in Hawai'i began to develop a large pearl-fishing industry, which quickly became a colossal goldmine for the people of the islands, bringing money and tourists.
    Spoiler :

    The consistent improvements to living conditions under Juarez's rule soon gained international recognition. Mexico City, which had seen its slums developed into safe, healthy communities, was soon listed by various travel journals as one of the great metropolises of the world, only improved by its ancient Mesoamerican wonders.
    Spoiler :

    With the end of the Imperial Wars in Europe, many great powers had begun to question the status quo following other conflicts such as the Opium War, and the rising power of Mexico was thusly invited to the Congress of Krolewiec in Poland as a neutral party. The subject of debate was whether the losing side of the conflict (the Habsburgs who had initiated the war) should have their territories divided by the victors. Juarez supported national integrity and sovereign rule over imperialism, and many attendees followed suit, leading to no change in the status quo.
    Spoiler :

    The Republic of Mali, instead of flourishing, had grown corrupt and inefficient over its ten years of independence. The nation's President soon met with President Juarez, begging to return to the previous relationship of paternalistic support. Juarez surprisingly complied, supporting the motion due to the request coming from the people of Mali themselves, rather than being imposed on them as a term of independence as had happened before.
    Spoiler :

    As Juarez's second term rapidly came to an end, Spanish rule in South America finally began to end. After years of begging for support from Colombia or Mexico, the people of Peru claimed their own destiny. Following a bloody war and millions of deaths, the nation of Peru declared itself independent of Spanish rule, becoming a dictatorship led by the same general who secured national freedom.
    Spoiler :

    Despite tensions caused by Mexico's lack of support, Peru still signed a defensive pact to show solidarity between former Mexican colonies, extending a unified network of post-colonial states containing Mexico, Peru, the United States and Mali.
    Spoiler :

    Benito Juarez's second term in office was less successful than his first, marred by the early government standstill and a declining economy. Quality of life and education continued to improve nonetheless. Only the next election would show whether the President and his reform party had fallen out of favor.
     
  13. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Secretario

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    1866 Election
    Ignacio Comonfort has retired from pursuing the presidency, but still serves in Congress. Porfirio Diaz, with vigor and outrage, has managed to oust his rivals within the Liberal-Conservative Alliance, leaving him dominant within the party.

    Moderate National Party
    Supports freedom in the economy. Desires slightly large government that protects national rather than personal interests. Emphasis on meeting regionalist, rather than federalist, needs. Highly nationalist, with a focus on liberating formerly European colonies. Promotes the freedom of all men. Supports expansionism, but with peaceful assimilation of local native cultures.
    Spoiler :
    Pio de Jesus Pico (age 65)
    Spoiler :
    Former President. Former Governor of California. Famously ugly, but beloved by his employees and most Californians. Wealthy but kind landowner, entrepreneur and rancher. Declare Galiano a state, rather than a territory, and end the territorial system. Promote the gambling industry. Build a Catholic Cathedral in Los Angeles as a symbol for the Mexican people. Raise research spending, and continue to expand Mexico’s vast trade network. Begin to settle more of the North American interior. Launch a naval tour to show off Mexico's growing scope to the rest of the world powers. Restore the free trade system of Mexico, and end all research and development of socialist programs. Instead put money into projects that will create jobs and wealth for Mexico.

    Spoiler :
    Juan Bautista Ceballos (age 55)
    Spoiler :

    Former Minister of Justice under Pico and Comonfort. Believes Pio Pico places too much emphasis on the economy over the people of Mexico. Heavily demilitarize due to a lack of regular wars in Mexico to reduce expenses. Fund independence movements in Rio de La Plata, as well as other colonies. Expand Mexico's alliance network. Introduce several social programs based on Juarez's ideas, but to a less radical degree. Abolish the death sentence.

    Liberal Conservative Alliance
    A party formed from the merger between the Old Liberal and Conservative parties. It has lost the pro-European nature of the Conservatives and the secularism of the Liberals. The Alliance is protectionist and will do whatever it takes to grow the Mexican economy above all others, favouring wealth over nationality. A strong military is key to their platform, as is a firm international presence like those of many European powers. Supports a strong executive branch.
    Spoiler :
    Porfirio Diaz (age 36)
    Spoiler :
    Former young Colonel in the Mexican army, serving since age 14. Ambitious. A meticulous planner. Boasts a shrewd tactical mind and compelling presence. Wants to completely change the Liberal Conservative Alliance to be a party for the Mexican people, then reform the electoral system to prevent complete victories such as Juarez's. Continue to expand free trade, using foreign investment as a stimulus, though under heavy scrutiny. Reform the Mexican Army to be a modern and efficient career path, rather than a bureaucracy. Charge politicians who express a desire to take away freedoms from Mexican people with treason. Make science the most important tool of a strong Mexican government, including an increase in research spending. Restrict the vote to those who are currently employed, and require politicians to have a military service record. Declare war on Spain to liberate the Rio de La Plata. Heavily tax the rich, but emphasize collective, fair ownership over nationalization.

    Mexican Reform Party
    A party founded on the principle of bringing the vote to all citizens, regardless of race or sex. Endorses social programs that help create a better educated, more stable Mexican society. Inspired by socialist principles, but hopes to make them work within an industrialized free market environment. Work to eliminate poverty and racism. Isolationist and protectionist.
    Spoiler :
    Benito Juarez (age 60)
    Spoiler :
    Incumbent President. Former Liberal and Moderate National, member of parliament for over fifteen years. Incredible orator. Recently developed a sickly condition. Rash, but always optimistic and protective. Believes both opposing parties are broken, and do not represent the average Mexican. End social segregation. Encourage stronger relationships with Asian powers, and promote immigration. Close down some trade deals once they expire. Declare an embargo on all imperialist powers until their colonies are released. Continue to develop the relationship between the Mexican government and native bands as one of respect, to make them feel like a part of the nation. Nationalize the majority of Mexican industry. Enact welfare programs for the unemployed, homeless, disabled and elderly out of taxpayer pocket. Heavily increase taxes on the rich.
     
  14. A.Caesar

    A.Caesar Chieftain

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    Juarez again for me.
     
  15. ChineseWarlord

    ChineseWarlord Chieftain

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    Why should you care?
    Call me a traitor to all that is good, but I'm gonna go with Juan Bautista Ceballos this time. Reform is best done gradually, so the robber barons don't realize what is happening until it is far too late.
     
  16. Bautos42

    Bautos42 Chieftain

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    I too vote for Juarez
     
  17. Glorious Leader

    Glorious Leader Chieftain

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    I'll vote Benito Juarez
     
  18. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Secretario

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    I'll toss my vote in for Porfirio Diaz, results will hopefully be up today or tomorrow :)
     
  19. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Secretario

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    1866 Election: Results
    Reform Party: 3 (60%)

    Juarez: 3 (100)
    Liberal-Conservative Alliance: 1 (20%)

    Diaz: 1 (100%)
    Moderate Nationals: 1 (20%)
    Ceballos: 1 (100%)

    Benito Juarez's third victory marks a historic moment in Mexico!
    Spoiler :
    Benito Juarez's latest victory in the Presidential elections is a first for the nation, as he is the only Head of State thus far to win the position three times. Though support has slipped since the mass popularity Juarez held in the 1860 election, the Reform Party still dominates the national caucus. Change seems to be ever on the Mexican horizon.
     
  20. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Secretario

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    1866-1872: New Directions
    At the start of his third term, President Benito Juarez did something a little different; he didn't decrease research spending. Happy with the current status quo of the prior term, the Reform government instead maintained their previous goals, happy with the progress they were currently making.

    Under Juarez's time in office, Mexico's population had been rapidly growing, largely due to open immigration policies and the heavy improvements in public health. The nation soon would be listed as one of the most populous countries in the world.
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    In Rapidos, which had long been a city without a dominant religion among its settlers, finally saw a string of Protestant churches take hold of the local population. Its lack of regulations for frontier living likely appealed to the people of Dakota, despite Mexicans now making up most of the population.
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    Around 1867, the scientist Lucas Alaman, an aging supporter of the defunct Conservative Party, returned to national prominence through his studies of natural sciences. Based out of Los Angeles due to self-imposed exile and its viable position to help explore the world, his newfound reputation inspired Alaman to return to the national capital, where he would found the Alaman Academy of Sciences under his name, which soon became Mexico's most prestigious school for years to come.
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    The large surplus built up over Juarez's presidency was soon put to good use early in the term. Various construction and infrastructure projects received extensive government funding across the country. The most significant of these was the government funds used to buy out the remaining trade monopolies, putting the once exploitative colonial industries under government control and regulation.
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    In the north-east of the continent, the Dominion of Canada formed, declaring its independence. The autonomous nation was a confederation of formerly French and British colonies that banded together to seek independence, seeing more in common with each other than with their respective overlords, who forced harsh taxes with little support. This move left French Louisiana and British Newfoundland as the only European colonies in North America. The Prime Minister, a Scotsman named John A. Macdonald, soon met with Benito Juarez personally, commenting that he "never thought a small man could be so large".
    Spoiler :

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    With nationalization driving many secondary industries based off of colonial luxuries to Mexico City, the textile industry experienced a massive boom, dominating the region completely, overseen by government staff.
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    The University of Santa Fe finally opened in 1869, bringing new opportunities for an expanded education to many men, and some women of Mexico. Unlike Alaman Academy, which was much more exclusive and science focused, USF taught a wider variety of material to a wider variety of students.
    Spoiler :

    After years of campaigning for a more socialist direction in Mexico, Juarez’s dreams were achieved: a variety of pension plans, paid child care, food for youth, homeless shelters and many more programs were abruptly enacted. A variety of industries, relying on transportation and manufacturing, were also nationalized. This was all a part of the Mexican People’s Act, or the 1869 Act, which Juarez had been tirelessly drafting and pushing into practice for much of his political career. Though many members of opposition parties were outraged, alongside conservative citizens, Reform caucus members, as well as a few Moderate Nationals breaking party lines, allowed it to pass. Though a large number of Mexicans celebrated the changes, others, including politicians, threatened "drastic action" if any more actions were taken. Juarez, however, seemed temporarily satisfied, and rejected the few Marxist calls for a full Communist transformation, something he thought impossible and in opposition to democracy.
    Spoiler :

    Hoping to control interference and action against the changes in government policy, President Juarez founded a secret service to investigate treasonous conspiracies, or track foreign agents. The MIB, or Mexican Intelligence Bureau, soon set to work from its headquarters in Mexico City.
    Spoiler :

    The research efforts of the Mexican Republic finally turned back to steel. Despite the detours, Juarez too hoped to build a railroad that would help to unify the people of his country. Additionally, Mexican political scientists accepted an offer to help draft a constitution for the Ottoman sultans, who hoped to satisfy rising unrest with a more fair style of monarchy.
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    Benito Juarez would have little time to celebrate the achievement of his goals. After years of declining health, a winter flu left him hospitalized for a week, weakening him further. On January 21, 1870, Benito Juarez's heart gave out, and he passed away. The nation went into mourning. The current Minister of Justice, Sebastian Lerdo de Tejada, was elected by the Reform Party to succeed Juarez until the next general election.
    Spoiler :

    Sebastian Lerdo de Tejada, Seventh President of Mexico

    The now-President Tejada soon went about going back on a few of his predecessor's more "radical" behaviours, such as reopening a variety of trade deals Juarez had ended, believing the now tighter control over Mexican industries would prevent the abuses that international demand had previously wrought.
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    The higher income that foreign trade brought Mexico also allowed Tejada to risk increasing research spending once more, hoping the swift completion of a railroad would help earn him the adoration Juarez himself once received.
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    Unexpectedly, the city of Sacramento was seized by celebrations in Juarez's memory for several months. The city had entered the Republic of Mexico as little more than a Spanish fort, and was now a bustling, healthy city, largely helped by the leadership of the deceased Benito Juarez.
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    The fall of 1870 saw what remained of the Choctaw tribe arrive in large numbers, fleeing Louisiana into Mexican territory due to harassment by French troops attempting to relocate them. Pressed into a corner and desperate, many Choctaw braves began raiding local Mexican farmsteads, despite attempts by Tejada to send diplomats to open negotiations.
    Spoiler :

    The Choctaw continued their raids into 1871, refusing to make contact with Mexican officials, pursued by French troops. Their raids grew more vicious, leading to several dozen deaths in New Mexico. The Mexican Army was forced to retaliate. On March 3, 1871, the last of the Choctaw met with a brigade of Mexican riflemen, and were exterminated. The surviving women and children were relocated to live in other native communities, though they shared little culture or language.
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    In 1872 (the end of Tejada’s term), Rafael Guizar y Valencia, a Catholic priest, became famous for his work caring for the poor and sickly across Mexico. Many saw him as figure exemplary of the Juarez era, and his regular sessions preaching in the central square at Mexico City became a cultural icon, even popular among tourists.
    Spoiler :

    Though President Tejada had done his best to fill the void Juarez left behind, only the 1872 election would be able to measure his success.
     

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