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MigratioNES: The Grandest Tale Ever Told

Discussion in 'Never Ending Stories' started by Lord_Iggy, Apr 24, 2016.

  1. Luckymoose

    Luckymoose The World is Mine

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    The Amalyafv will continue developing their chirping/whistling language as they mingle with the Gero Basin peoples. They'll settle eastward into the smaller river valley emptying in the southern sea, branching off into successor groups as they merge with large populations. Not much else to say, as it is likely they'll be succeeded by the Amalyo or another group.

    Also, I think it's time for a severe drought along the Gero River, eh?
     
  2. inthesomeday

    inthesomeday Immortan

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    If the drought's caused by a heating period, then oughtn't the iced mountains to melt and flood the south?
     
  3. Thlayli

    Thlayli Le Pétit Prince

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    Tiryap 7: The Yap Awakens, or, Snakes on a Plain

    A desperate struggle for control initiates in the Timika Valley, between Nekra, Mkyaph, Tiryats and Timika. Thanks to all the migration, the land is too densely populated to support everyone, so someone's going to lose, but who?

    Ultimately, the victory goes to the Tiryat, who essentially manage to breed effective wolfhounds at this time through periodic adaptation and training, though the breeds are still somewhat rough and not so different from wolves. Tiryat groups are the most well adapted to the climate, as the ecological catastrophe altered the native fauna the Timika and Mykaph used to rely on in what was once desert land and is now cold coniferous forest. With their superior hunting techniques and cold weather clothing, the Tiryats kill and assimilate the natives, although the sea remains named Timika. The combined population of riverdwellers will henceforth be known as Tiriyata.

    As for the Mkyaph and Timika, many of them are absorbed into the Tiriyata, swelling their numbers, while others, clinging to their separate identities, are taken in by the Ikyah wanderers who share their oases with them. Over a period of centuries, this new group migrates north into the lands of the Apfal, where they begin to dwell in the warmer seas according to the legends of their ancestors. This fusion culture of Timika and Ikyah is called Imikyah.

    The Akp become increasingly well adapted to the misty mountain caves of what they call the Tzpha Rift, where they make the first Tiryap language family art, a charming portrait of a giant black snake consuming animals and children. AND THE WORL- anyhow, groups eventually leave the Rift to inhabit the upper reaches of the great Wabaho River, displacing less-advanced Apa'nuk tribes. This strand will be called Kptp. Other Akp clades will push down into the Obaho coastlands. They will make good offerings to Black Snake God.

    Meanwhile, in the Thunderdome Itap Sea, Tiryaps will use dogs acquired from diffusion from the Timika Valley, and will use packs of them to hunt down the Diryaj like the monsters that they are. Wooden javelins with fire-hardened points also become more popular during this time as the Tiryap become extremely adept hunters and throwers. While the Tiryap will be highly hostile to the arrival of Querhua migrants, killing and ritually eating them, they will end up reverse-engineering a lot of their technology and combining it with their more advanced hunting techniques to help turn the Itap into one of the most technologically developed areas in the world. Ziag will make a final push, aided by dogs and perhaps primitive slings, to claim the Ikzil valleys for their own and drive the mountain dwellers into the higher dales.

    The Diryaj, hounded on all sides and lacking the adaptive hunting-teamwork ability of their Tiryap cousins, will be driven out of the Itap Sea to the south, as Tiryaps come to be the predominant group, albeit becoming much taller than their neighbors due to a bit of Diryaj intermarrying. As the ice sheets retreat, the Diryaj will kill everything that moves south of the Ypta Mountains, their giant stature and smaller groups making them better suited to the low population density, harsh life and large, brutal creatures living south of the mountains. Once established here, they will make it very hard for anyone else to replace them.

    The Diafhe continue to press north, perhaps pushed out of the way by the Querhua outmigration, further adapting to the savannah and eventually pressing towards Vamalo and Vomma territory. If the Querhua invent bows, the Diafhe will most likely be early adopters of this technology for their hunting pursuits.

    I won't talk about Makyerf, Far Tiryat or the Tharyavs since I don't want to control too many groups.
     
  4. Luckymoose

    Luckymoose The World is Mine

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    Droughts don't require warm weather.
     
  5. Terrance888

    Terrance888 Discord Reigns

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    The Dry Times Orders

    Places with Orders
    Gero
    Akal
    Kippal
    Agal
    Wobaoh
    Waban
    Ap
    Wab
    Bana
    Wabaha
    Hwabhwa
    Querhua
    Ebe
    Amalyafv
    Tiryat->Tiriyata
    (Nekra, Mkyaph, Tiryats)
    Mkyaph+Ikyah->Imikyah
    Akp
    Kptp
    Tiryap
    Ziag
    Diryaj
    Diafhe

    Places I will order
    Nekra
    North+west Itaro Region
    Wabban

    Nekra

    The Nekra, an offshoot of the herdchasing Myakap culture, do not contest to control the Timika sea per say. Rather, they continue to chase their herds and develop their herding and nature flowing spirituality (and generally stay out of everyone’s way). That is, until the wolf-men Tiryats push strongly into their traditional territory with their ravenous packs. The Nekra, ever protective of “their” herds, develop a rivalry with the Tiryat/Tiriyata. Additionally, through many generations of herd chasing and the new thought of bending the creatures of nature into alliance, they may begin domesticating their former partners. If some manage to domesticate camel-esque creatures, they may range into the desert. Also, although they are against the wolf-men, the Nekra may over time hypocritically adopt their dogs as well to assist their herding and herd chasing.

    (@Thlayli, I hope keying my orders off your orders is ok)

    Wabban

    The Wabban are in one of the largest temperate regions known to mankind so far. And the incredibly visible changing seasons mark a huge departure from annual patterns elsewhere. The Wabban start developing seasonal ritual, and struggle to find ways to mark the passing of time. Perhaps they would turn to the sun, moon, and stars. Or they might fall into route counting of days or moons. This closeness with the patterns of nature also causes emphasis on the patterns of breeding and growth among plants and animals, and an urge to learn and master these natural patterns for their own benefit. (this urge may or may not bear fruit this update). The Wabban quickly develop a concept of man’s place in the world as it’s master as they learn of their new world and bend it to their whims, but also of man’s inability to stand against the seasons, and time itself.


    The North and Western Itaro Regions

    Ikzil, Tyumru, Fumo, Goeh, Coeh, Vamalo

    As the Vamalo Moon-cycles ritual spread to the Fumo-Kuku, so too does the Ikzil Star-naming spread to the Tyumru. The Tyumru, perhaps from their ancient Tiryapic bloodline, name many after great beasts and animals of the Itaro region. Along the river boundary between the Fumo, Vamalo, Goeh, and Tyumru the fusion of the Moon-cycle and Star-cycles rituals give rise to a new astronomical-centric ritual center. First sticks, then stones rise to mark the confluence of various sky patterns and the omens they supposedly name. The new shared interest in sky-naming does not dampen the endemic warfare, but it does lead to increased cooperation during times of peace (instead of merely temporary cooperation during times of war).

    To further define the moon-cycle rituals of the Vamalo, the changing face of the moon symbolized the changing flora and fauna of the plains they move over. Whereas the ancient Fumo forebear of the Vamalo merely concerns itself with increasing the hope for a better future, the Vamalo sees these moon patterns embolismic of greater ones, of “unite-for war-that-we-must-fight” and “hope-for time-of-milk-and-honey”. Already, before this update, the Fumo have erected simple temporary structures and ritual sites to welcome their Vamalo partners.

    The Fumo concept of “Hope-for Good-future-for Us” spreads further. No longer is “Us” a relatively compact (larger than clan) region. It now spreads to their Kuku allies. The Vamalo clan or three which stops at their ritual sites at exact times every year or two. The Tyumru skull-chief whose sky-spirit-woman comes to discuss the tail chasing snake or the wolf slaying bear with their own future-spirit-seer.

    As the deluge of Querhua and Gero descend upon the Itaro, the distinctive cultures of the North and West coasts impresses themselves upon the newcomers, even if the ancient peoples who birthed them are swept away…
     
  6. Thlayli

    Thlayli Le Pétit Prince

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    Yeah that's fine Terrance!
     
  7. North King

    North King blech

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    The drought is a localized one caused by a local increase in ocean temperature, not an increase in all oceans, continental, or global average temperatures. Note how El Niño years on Earth are not, generally speaking, significantly hotter, but can still cause droughts in regions very, very far from the western Pacific.
     
  8. ork75

    ork75 Prince

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    The far west Oebhwaho, the ones across the strait, continue to move west and north along the coast. They fish, they hunt with spears, and begin to diverge from their relatives to the East linguistically. They are the Oypuao. The groups inland hunt whatever big and medium game there is, utilizing organized group hunts and fire, and the coastal peoples fish.

    They leave small cairns in their wake. These pathside shrines serve both religious and navigational purposes, and the new culture places their faith in a worldwide network of guiding "dreamways" on which humans travel spiritually. The cairns mark intersections and waypoints along these routes.
     
  9. SouthernKing

    SouthernKing crickety cricket

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    (tell me if I'm doing anything wrong here)

    Some of the desert Ikyah splinter into two groups.

    The Ixyah, situated vaguely in the same region as their ancestors, further develop their astronomical knowledge; their mythology begins to grow into an increasingly complex one featuring the interplay of star-inhabiting "celestial spirits" in an eternal conflict with the evil sun. In the process, watching the varied wandering objects that seem to cross the sky every few months, the Ixyah notice that some of these objects seem to abruptly reverse direction every so often. Due to their seemingly random motion the Ixyah deduce that the spirits guiding these wandering stars must be tricksters aligned with the sun.

    The Ikji wander east, further into the depths of the desert. In addition to inheriting their ancestors' nocturnal and astrological ways, the Ikji come to see the oases and watering-holes they congregate around as holy sites of a fashion.

    Still others wander further east into the Abhwal headwaters, where they mingle with some peripheral Vomma. The resulting Immah help spread the nocturnal lifestyle and belief in the destroying sun amongst the communities and peoples who have congregated around the river.
     
  10. Lord_Iggy

    Lord_Iggy Tsesk'ihe

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    Update 7: 40 000 Years

    Northern Continent (Wabana)

    Independent of the Tiryat domestication of wolves on the southern continent, the Obo people (of Wab and Wobaoh admixture) of the northwestern interior forests have made a similar alliance with bushy-tailed canids. These northern wolves had been living for many generations as commensal scavengers, but more recently have come to develop a closer relationship with the Obos. This has allowed both to hunt far larger and more dangerous prey than would otherwise be practical for either species on their own (incidentally dramatically reducing the population of northern megafauna), and has allowed the Obos to spread widely. Through indirect networks of trade, these tame wolves have spread across the west, and into the northern reaches of the Wab basin. Roaming far across the northern temperate and boreal Zones, the Obos have even come into contact with the Wabban of the far east, spreading their culture and their animal companions into these farflung riverlands.

    The other major breakthrough of the north has been the creation of dugout canoes, which arose in the central river valley of the Wab, but swiftly spread across the continent. These greatly improve the connectivity of the long coastline, as well as the maritime capabilities of those who possess them.

    Of all the peoples of the north, the Wabban have become the most numerous. Dominating a large, temperate region rich in wildlife and edible plants, the population density of the Wabban has mushroomed to levels only seen otherwise in the great rivers and inland seas of the southern continent. To maintain such a population, they have had to strive to understand and master their natural environment, developing a particularly keen understanding of the cyclical patterns that enrich their verdant land.

    At long last, the isolation between the northern and southern continents has been broken. Wabaha mariners have crossed into the lands of the Wabahn, while a group of Weway have crossed the strait separating them and the Wab. The southerners have found a group speaking languages that are incomprehensible to them, a people with sloping foreheads, bright, strangely-coloured hair, and protruding jaws, but they are clearly recognizable as fellow humans.


    Western Continent (Epua)

    The Ebe people of the western continent fear the violent waters that carried them from their ancestral homelands. Abandoning the raft-roaming ways of their ancestors, they have migrated inland. Meanwhile, their close cousins, the Oypuao, have spread far further and maintain a stronger presence on the coast, though some Oypuao do migrate inland. A major distinguishing feature between these two groups can be found in their beliefs. The Ebe revere a Sun God, while reviling an evil Storm God, while the Oypuao have a more animist faith, centred around stone cairns and dreamways, physical paths of the non-physical human spirit.


    Southern Continent (Apala)

    The world is turned on its head as a great drought in the Gero Valley has led to a great exodus of humans (primarily Gero, Querhua and Amalyo), armed with the most advanced cultural toolkits yet to be developed by humanity. This has both radically changed the face of the ancient homeland of humanity, and done a great deal to spread comparatively 'advanced' traits and technologies across this portion of the world. The causes of this drought (which is better described as a series of acute dry periods highlighted in the midst of a general regional drying trend and the equatorial shifting of climate bands) are a complex mixture of periodic climate oscillations and the continued accumulation of material into the antarctic ice cap, which has grown so tall as to have a significant affect on continental climate patterns.

    Geros, who had already been pushed into marginalized regions by the Querhua, were the most harshly affected. A major wave of Geros, the Gevera, flooded northwards into the jungles, throwing them into immediate conflict with the mixture of Avenecs, Hwabhwas and Wabahas who called the southeastern jungles their homes. However, armed with fearsome bows and greater levels of social organization, the Geveras were able to back up their migration with force of arms. Across much of the lower reaches of the rivers, the Geveras were able to establish nearly full control, either engulfing the native populations, driving them out, or exterminating them. Further up the rivers, their influence was less absolute, and the Geveras merged into the native milieu, giving rise to the Hwetkas.

    To the east of the Gero River, it was the Querhua who migrated in much larger numbers. The Quera spread across the temperate belt and entered the Akger River en masse. The native Akals fought back, but were largely displaced, either further west or to the upper reaches of the river. This had the secondary effect of driving a large number of Akals into the realm of the Kippals, significantly diversifying the area, as well as accelerating the region's technological development.

    The Agals, pushed to the brink by the invasion of the Saryaz, survive by dint of their ancient relationship with the southern ungulate herds. By harvesting individuals when needed, and protecting the herds at other times, the Agals have been able to secure their existence. They have also subtly influenced the evolution of their herds: the hoofed beasts are less skittish around humans, and seem to tolerate their presence to a degree.

    The Sierhua are a Querhua group who moved south, merging with the Amalyos, who already had more experience in surviving in the new, arid climate system affecting the upper river. The Sierhua themselves gave rise to a new group that set out across the Kicca plains, the Sierda. The furthest Sierda have reached the end of the Long Sea, and the Yakgu Rifts. Here, they have settled next to the Mnalyaba and Daryava, turning this region into an impressively diverse melting pot of cultures, genes and technologies. The Mnalyaba have mixed heavily with the new arrivals, though in far eastern regions they remain relatively distinctive from the Sierda. Further west, the Tharyavs generally are wiped out by conflict with southern Amalyafvs, or come to assimilate into the culture of their Daryava cousins. Meanwhile, the Mnayakgu rift-men keep their heads down and out of the way, opting to continue living largely outside of the influence of the large, clumsy 'walking men'.

    In the south, the Amalyafvs remain well-established, enjoying the fruits of regular contact with the hectic north.

    At the northern end of the rifts are the Urbala, descended from Wabaha who expanded to this coast many thousands of years ago, from their homelands in distant, northern deltas. Urbalas have a mixed relationship with the inland Saryaz, alternating between trading and warfare from season to season.

    The Gierho pursued a westerly migration route, flooding into the Apalo plains. Absorbing the last of the Apalos, the Gierhos warred against the Diafhe, and at times even the Vamalos, until they reached the nigh-legendary Itaro, the sea that the Diafhe referred to as 'Itap'. Here, they found a warring milieu of strange and alien men: terrifying, cannibalistic ogres, mer-folk, wild southerners full of hate and fear, and the embattled Fumos. The Gierho, repulsed and terrified by the Diryaj 'ogres', set themselves to destroying these monster-men, driving the bulk of the survivors to the south and taking the eastern Itaro as the spoils. News of the riches of Itaro, spread by the farflung Vamalos and some mobile Gierhos, drew on a secondary wave of migration. With population pressures rapidly intensifying, the Gierhos surged outwards once again. Saviours against the Diryaj scourge no more, the Gierhos now expanded against the Fumos, Coeh and Goeh. Many Gierhos were similarly shocked by the bizarreness of the Cao, interpreting them as malevolent spirits made flesh and killing them as such. The toehold of the aquatic hominids on the coasts of the Itaro is now minimal indeed, and the proud and ancient Fumos are largely assimilated or gone, a few independent groups hanging on at the eastern frontier of the Gierhos.

    In the south, Gierhos warred and mingled with the Tiryaps, producing the hybrid Gierhyep. With knowledge of survival in the colder southern regions of the Itap, the Gierhyep have rapidly overtaken the Tiryaps, while maintaining large portions of Tiryap culture. Purebred Tiryaps are pushed now to the fringes.

    Tyumrus, having by now acquired many of the military technologies of the invaders (and having a large river separating them from the Gierhos) were able to hold their lands, also insulating the Ikzils from direct Gierho contact. Meanwhile, in the south, a strange ethnogenesis has occurred between southern Tyumrus, Ziags, and Tiryap/Tiryats displaced by the ascendant Gierhyep. The Zyuzak, as they are named, are as a whole highly hostile to the Gierhyep, and have provided significant resistance to their advance. In spite of this, isolated Gierhyep settlements can still be found in almost all parts of the Itap basin.

    Most recently, the Ziags have begun a renewed movement into the Ikzil Vale, ensuring that there are truly no reprieves from the violent history of the cradle of humanity.

    Throughout all of this, a growing set of religious beliefs has been spreading throughout the Itaro, influenced by the star-naming of the desert people to the west, and the lunar cycle rituals of the northern Vamalos. Simple marking sticks and placed stones mark sites and symbols of legendary portent.

    West of the basin, beyond the alpine Mukta, the Ikyah people of the Great Sand Ocean have diverged in several directions, giving rise to the Ikji and Ixyah. Both people have developed a strong reverence for the stars, whose movements form the basis of their spiritual beliefs. The Immahs, another Ikyah offshoot, have also spread their nocturnal, sun-defying ways to the upper reaches of the Abhwal River, interbreeding with the Vommas.

    South of the vast desert, around the Timika Sea, things are becoming somewhat less chaotic, a the Tiryats, the people most well-adapted to and familiar with boreal survival, cement their control over the inland sea. The new rulers of this region are known as Tiriyata, having absorbed many influences from the more populous Timika. Timika culture survives in the north, while the Mkyaph remain a distinct presence in the south, though they are increasingly influenced by the Tiriyatas.

    In the far southwest, isolated, coastal Tiryats have diverged into the Kiryaks, who have independently rediscovered the large mammal hunting techniques that their distant cousins once practiced thousands of kilometers away, on the shores of the Long Sea.

    Some Timikas, forming close associations with the Ikyah, gradually migrate across the Great Sand Ocean, oasis by oasis, until they reach the Apfal Sea. The Apfals, while numerous, are rather backwards, and the Imikyah people are able to establish a foothold on the far side of the desert.

    In the great spine of the continent, rising high out of the equatorial jungles to soaring, glacier-capped peaks, live the Akp, in the fractured land they call the Tzpha Rift. Here, they create religious art, featuring the motif of a black, all-consuming serpent. A northwestern expansion of the Akp people puts them into contact with the coastal Obahos, beginning a long and contentious conflict between the highlands and the lowlands. On the inland slope of the mountains, the Kptp move into the headwaters of the Wabaha River, driving many Apa'nuks deeper into the forest.

    At the end of this age, the world is changed in many ways by the great migrations out of the Gero basin- though old familiar faces are still clearly present. Features of anatomical modernity have spread across the home continent, with only the more isolated regions in the far west and far southeast remaining largely unaffected. Along with this have come technologies: new techniques of stone tool manufacture are spreading rapidly, such that much of the world now possesses a mesolithic level of technology. Bows, spear-throwers, harpoons and other such weapons allow for more successful hunting, as well as more successful warring against rival humans. The dog has been domesticated- twice, in fact! The Tiryat Dog can be found across the southern reaches of the home continent, from the Kiryak coast to the Long Sea, and in many places they have spread northwards. The Obo Dog, domesticated from a different species of wolf native to Wabana, can be found from Wabban to Ap. The dog is not the only species making steps towards domestication: the boreal antelopes of the Agal are also making their first, basic steps.

    Humanity is advancing now more rapidly than ever. What once took hundreds of thousands of years is now being accomplished in mere thousands. Who can imagine what wonders may lie ahead?

    Spoiler :


     
  11. Daftpanzer

    Daftpanzer There may be more posts after this.

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    Awesome update, Iggy!!! I've been keeping my eye on this :)

    If I understand correctly, I'm free to create my own branch, or at least attempt to do so?

    I'm especially interested in the peoples of the northern continent. I was wondering what the Obo people look like physically? Although I also assume at this stage, with the updates having fewer years involved, its much more about culture than genetics.
     
  12. Terrance888

    Terrance888 Discord Reigns

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    Rainbands shifts southward over The Great Sand Ocean, perhaps leading to growing flora in the desert and growth in the Great Inland Seas. Perhaps several could even drain into a sea after flooding their basins. Or perhaps, it could lead to seasonal rivers and erosion. Whatever the case, the ancient drying of the hominid homeland seems like it is, if at least temporarily, reversed.

    (*shrug* if this is not viable tell me, but I don't have anything I really want to do and I felt like I did enough where I wanted to interfere with.)
     
  13. thomas.berubeg

    thomas.berubeg Wandering the World

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    The AMH traits introduced by the new migrants spread along the coast and up the rivers of Wabana, and from there across the continent.

    The Wabban have learned the cycle of the stars, and that things happen at approximately the same time as the stars look the same. Numerous shaped stone pillars serve as reminders, carved and painted with Ochre into the likeness of the night sky when particular plants are ready to eat, or the great storms or coming. Some Wabban on the river have even noticed that the plants they like to eat grow in middens that they have abandoned in a prior year.

    Many of the people on the coast of the northern continent have adopted the use of dogs on their little flotillas. These dogs have long shaggy coats and long limbs, allowing them to shed salt water from the foam. They are adept swimmers and enjoy cooling off in the water.

    The Wabahn people, now known as the Arpam, have developed a robust artistic tradition that has influenced many people across the continent. They carve stone into the shapes of various spirits.





    The Wab also have developed an artistic tradition, driving fish shaped effigies into the closest bodies of water. The Wab further upriver, also, have begun to coexist with herds of wild sheep. These animals provide a steady source of protein, and are ideal as companions to early human groups: They are relatively aggressive, are social animals, and breed very quickly, as well as producing much needed proteins.

    The Wobaoh develop ground stone tools (Again, which spread to other people), creating both more effective weaponry, but also delicate jewelries and useful "dinner ware:" Bowls, Pots, etc.

    Meanwhile, the Technological package of the south, the bow and arrow, introduced by crews from the south, have spread through most of the continent.
     
  14. thomas.berubeg

    thomas.berubeg Wandering the World

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    All the people of the northern continent have long, muscular arms, take on fat easily, and are gregarious. Physically, they tend towards the paler spectrum, while the hair of the women is Brindled: patterns of Black and Red. Males have a slight propensity to Albinism. Anatomically Modern Human traits have been introduced as of late, so, probably their faces emphasize neotanous traits.

    Edit: I forgot, but the founding population had some of those people with the stranger vocal cords, giving the northern continent a larger vocal range
     
  15. Lord_Iggy

    Lord_Iggy Tsesk'ihe

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    Think of it as a bit like a NESLife. No one has exclusive ownership over a group of people. You're free to create a group emerging from any other group on the planet. Anywhere works. If you want to go into a place that already has a lot of humans and a lot of conflict and history, I would recommend the southern continent (some call it Apala). The northern continent, Wabana, is more ethnically homogenous: it's descended from a fairly smaller starter population. There is lots of space for interesting new things to arise there, if that piques your interest. The western continent, Epua, has only very recently been discovered, and people are still in the process of expanding across it. If you are interested in expanding into the unknown frontier of humanity, this would be a great place to start out.

    Most people on the northern continent tall and lanky, typically lean, but good at putting on fat, to help them get through difficult times. Their hair is typically straight and thick, and is most often black or red. In women, their hair is sometimes two-tone, a mixture of black and red. They're very sociable, and many of them tend to have something of a wanderlust, particularly outside of the more densely-populated areas on the coasts and rivers.

    The Obos, in specific, are lighter-skinned than their southern kin (who are very dark). In adapting to high latitudes, their skin has become paler, currently it's a middling skin tone, typically a light brown shade. The further north you are, the paler you are, on average. Because they are far isolated from the introductions of anatomically modern humans in the south of their continent, they tend to have some archaic traits, such as heavy brows, large and pronounced dentition (leading to their mouths being slightly more protruding), and backwards-sloping foreheads. In profile, a male Obo might look like this, but with fairer skin.



    The Obos are also a cool people for being the first to domesticate dogs on their continent, so they have a very close relationship with their companion animals.

    Thomas provided a pretty good description, I just decided to confirm that and added some further details.

    I can definitely work with the rain bands shifting, and that (coupled with what might eventually be the end of the current ice age) could definitely cause some interesting hydrology.
     
  16. inthesomeday

    inthesomeday Immortan

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    Apa'al Cultures
    Kogan Mountain
    The influx of immigrants from both the east and the south resulted in a new cultural hub in the Kogan Mountains and around the Kogan River. The accidental germination of Kogan-native plants with seeds brought by Aeger and Geroite refugees results in a revolution in the flora of the region. Culture and technology in the Kogan region explode with the new contacts. The craft techniques of the Gero valley and the Kippal stoneworking technologies improve food storage, and primitive walls and improved masonry from the period imply both a centralization of social orders following the migrations as well as an adaptive sentiment among the peoples of the Kogan.
    Social divisions also grow clearer and clearer with the introduction of new immigrants. Political organizations grow in complexity, with religious hierarchies and kinship orders defining the many territorial divisions among different tribes in the Kogans. Similar innovations spread across the rivers of the Kicca region, but with a population decrease in the Gero, the spotlight is now spread a bit more evenly.
    Aegal Plains
    Aegal humans become more and more dependent on the herds they follow for food, insulation, and even cultural rites in the form of early rituals concerning a spiritual connectivity with the herd animals. Though many Aegals die as a result of invasion, competition, or environmental changes, the course of natural selection is accelerated by cultural developments, and the Aegals grow closer and closer to the herds they follow, whose evolution is shaped by the same aforementioned phenomenon, though not as drastically as in Aegal cultural tradition.
    Itap Sea
    The bloodiest battlefield of human history where cultures have been born and die shakes the culture of the influx of Geroite refugees. The spread of archery technologies to Itap accelerates the already whirring wheels of slaughter and suffering. However, Geroite culture remains for the most part isolationist in Itap, building structures similar to in the Kogans. The shamanism in the Itap Geroites develops to center around a ghoulish death worship, but otherwise the traditional culture of the Gero exclaves in Itap remains sustained from Gero times.
    This xenophobia and isolationism is rare in Apa'al cultures, and reflects the harrowing nature of Itao during the time. Though the technologies of archery and superior tools spread to the natives in Itap, the finally homeostatic ethnic strain of the Geros was able to stay on the cutting edge of defense against cannibalism and invasion due to the ingenuity and adaptability of the tight-knit social groups that defined Geroite organization. Common tactics of self-defense when confronted with the dangers of roaming cannibals were generally centered around exploitation of tactically useful features of the surrounding environment, particularly the use of mud to camouflage, build impromptu defensive structures, or to cover up a hole dug quickly in the ground, followed by a concentrated barrage of arrows against the creatures.

    Apa'al Language Fun Fact: Itap Geroite- "Sleeping in a marsh" is an idiomatic expression used to describe an insurmountable problem or overly paranoid person.
     
  17. Lord_Iggy

    Lord_Iggy Tsesk'ihe

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    I'm starting work on the update now (doing climate stuff first). Post soon if you want to contribute!
     
  18. Lord_Iggy

    Lord_Iggy Tsesk'ihe

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    Update 8: 10 000 Years

    Northern Continent (Wabana)

    The men who came from the sea multiplied, they expanded, and they warred. The Veyay, with their smooth-ground tools and weapons, boats and greater social organization, rapidly overtook their delta region and a broad swath of coastline. The Wab culture is thus split into two broad branches, one in the eastern branch of their great desert river, the other in the west. Both have interbred, to a degree, with the Veyay, and have adopted the southerners' technological package. One group of northwestern Wab have merged with the local Obos, giving rise to the Hoppa people. These are some of the world's first herders, making use of dogs to manage herds of small ungulates.

    Further east, the newly-arrived Wabaha rapidly overwhelmed, absorbed or displaced the bulk of the native Wabahn. Naming themselves the Gueba (a word referring to their southern heritage and distinct origins), they also soon came to dominate a large region of the southern coast of this new continent. The Bana and Arpam (the remnants of the Wabahn) have become increasingly influenced by the Gueba, leading to gene and technological exchange, which is slowly beginning to filter through the hinterlands of the continent. While this has been largely a one-way exchange, Arpam and Bana art and body decoration has come into vogue among the Gueba, who festoon themselves with colourful feathers, quills and plant fibres, and carve human likenesses into stone. The Wavro, on the other hand, isolate themselves from the outsiders, holding onto the old ways and retreating deeper into the forests.

    The Wabban continue to grow and multiply, as a revolution begins to overtake their people. Recognizing that familiar plants were growing in their communal waste heaps, the Wabban made their first, stumbling steps towards agriculture. By deliberately sowing the grains in certain areas, they are able to control where plants will grow in the future. This practice has become highly ritualized, with star-watchers predicting the coming changes of the seasons, and stones marking the importance of these life-sustaining practices. The arrival of early agriculture, however simple, has been a welcome relief, as the arrival of hunting bows has lead to a major depopulation of the native megafauna in much of Wabana.

    Far to the west, the Wobaoh have made use of the many stone resources available in their region, allowing them to master many of the fine stoneworking tools introduced by the southerners, as well as producing some of the first ceramics, which have begun to spread across the continent.

    In the north of the continent, the Ap have gradually sidled north, moving with the shifting forested zones, while the Obo have expanded across a the shores of a vast, salty, northern body of water, and the Agvans diverge from the northern Wabban, creeping further and further up the frigid coast.


    Western Continent (Epua)

    The story of the people of Epua has been one of steady, largely peaceful expansion. The Ebe of the inland west have diverged into the Hebet, while the Oypuao have given rise to the southern Yopuo and the northern Oypo. The things that these people are very strange, and never seen before by other humans: strangely bloated, fat-trunked plants, pouched creatures in the trees, armoured behemoths on the ground, huge clawed beasts, and monstrous, predatory birds that walk like men. Fortunately, most of these animals are delicious.


    Southern Continent (Apala)

    The Akal migration into Kippal lands, combined with a heavy influence of Quera and Urbala influences, has led to the rise of the Aeger culture, on the Kogan River. The Aegers have become an increasingly organized and stratified culture, developing distinct social orders and simple clannish associations, which regularly war with one another for resources and prestige. Along with the Gero River, it is one of the most advanced regions in the world.

    The Agals, for their part, are content to remain as herders, tightening their relationship with their beasts through ever-more elaborate rituals. This herding behaviour gradually expands to their Saryaz neighbours. However, their lands are increasingly under threat, by the expansion of the Zarayaba and Nyamaba.

    At the end of the long sea, an extended period of migration winds down, as consolidation begins. The Matagya, Nyamaba, Zarayaba, Daryava, Mnalyaba and Sierda each occupy distinct areas, although interbreeding leads to a general homogenization of the region, with most populations having a mixture of Tiryap, Amalyap and Gero features. However, this does not lead to large-scale cultural homogenization. Long-held grudges, whose origins are so old as to be remembered only in myth, leave this area fractured and tribal, constantly at war with itself.

    The Mnayakgu, wisely, stay out of it, retreating into unreachable fastnesses when the walking men war with one another.

    The Amalyafvs hold their ground, steadily expanding into the south as the forests begin to expand once again into the tundra.

    The Gero Valley has been a hotbed of activity, technology and conflict. In the aftermath of the Gero Migration, populations continued to swell, but with outside lands now having similar technology to the people of the Valley itself, there was a far smaller opportunity for massive population movements. Thus, somewhat like the people of the Yakgu Rifts, the Gero Valley has become increasingly polarized and competition for resources reaches a fever pitch, as different groups vie for control of the rich region.

    It was around this time that Apala's agricultural revolution began, entirely independent of the similar events unfolding in Wabana. Exchange of different plants between the people of the Kogan, Aquer and Gero Rivers provided a fine starting combination of plants. It's not entirely clear where the first agricultural practices emerged, but they quickly spread across these rich river valleys, all of which enjoyed a broadly similar climate. This practice, for now, remains largely limited to these three rivers, but it is just beginning to spread beyond its area of origin, to the Rifts and the Itaro Sea.

    The Itaro remains violent, although to a somewhat lesser extent than before. What is most interesting in this region is the development of further religious beliefs. The sea is a mixing pot of Tiryap fetishism and shamanism, the worship of the night sky (spread by the wandering desert-folk), and a form of death worship practiced among many Gierhos and Gierhyeps.

    The Gierhos have pushed steadily eastwards, ultimately absorbing and extinguishing the last of the venerable Fumos, and extirpating the last of the mainland Cao. The Gierhyep, meanwhile, have continued to push back at the Zyuzak, Ziag, Ikzil and Tyumru, with only the latter managing to maintain a significant presence on the shores of the Itaro. The Diryaj, meanwhile, have been mercilessly hunted by the both of the migrant groups, driving them further and further into marginal territories.

    Around the Timika Sea, the Tiriyata are dominant, with the Timika and Mkyaph living on the fringes of the inland basin, while the Nekra and Tiryats live largely away from the rivers, hunting and gathering in the open plains and cold forests respectively.

    On the west coast, the Makapo/Wabako cultural complex remains largely intact, while the Myakaps and Makyerf provide an indirect connection between the Timika Sea and the outer ocean.

    The Apfal Sea is split between Apfals and Imikyahs, while the great mountains to the northwest are dominated by the Akp people, who carve huge images of the All-Consuming Serpent in hidden, sacred places deep in the mountains. Some even cross the Tzpha rift, and begin to settle the northern range.


    Across the world, populations are soaring. Advanced hunting techniques allow humans to take down bigger and bigger prey (leading in many cases to the extinction of naive megafauna). Agriculture has dawned, and along with it comes even more complex social organization. Some areas, particularly around the Kogan River, have begun to build simple, semi-permanent structures for shelter and storage. Art is widespread, and religions are appearing across many different cultures, early attempts to construct a cosmology to explain the world and all of the incredible things that it encompasses. The All-Consuming Serpent God of the Akp, the Spirit Fetishes of the Tiryaps, the Animal Totems of the Wab, the Holy Night Sky of the Ikyah, the Cyclical Moon God of the Vamalos and the Dreamways of the Oypuao are just a few of the countless ways that humanity has begun to interpret the mysteries around them.

    Spoiler :


     
  19. thomas.berubeg

    thomas.berubeg Wandering the World

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    The spread of the northern agricultural package amongst the Wabban is accompanied by increased tribal sedentarism (Though, as with their ancestors, it’s not uncommon for a Wabban, or a group of Wabban, to up and leave and travel to the edges of the world as merchants and traders in their teens and early adulthood, before either returning home or settling with a new tribe.) Wabban villages are characterized by many circles: circular huts are arranged in a circular pattern around a communal meeting ground, in the center of which is a raised hearth, and around it all is a low earthen wall.

    Near many Wabban villages are built communal passage graves, where the dead of the village are intered. The main passages of these graves are traditionally built high up, on a hill, with height added further via a tumulus, and line up with the North star. These passage graves are not the only megalithic structures built to correspond with the seasons: In a few places, on the highest of high hills, the Wabban have lugged immense stones and built henges, through which the sun rises on the equinoxes.



    Presumably, this implies the existence of an established clergy, though Wabban society remains mostly equitable. The Wabban religious complex focuses strongly on the cyclical nature of existence, and features deities that live and died and are reborn, as the Sun does daily.

    The Wab, and the Hoppa, to whom they are closely connected, on the other side of the continent, also treat their dead with immense respect, building megalithic communal tombs of their own. Unlike the Wabban, however, these barrows are dug downwards, with tumulus above, deep burial chambers lined with large stone and timber, emulating the caves that litter the region. The Wab Barrows are lined with the same stone fish-headed figurines that the Wab scatter in the rivers of the area, While the Hoppa line thiers with Dog statues. These, presumably, serve as spirit guardians.

    Sheep herding spreads down river, and (Maybe) the western agricultural package reaches the area.



    It is amongst the Veyaj that the first signs of true organized warfare is found in the north. While most of the people on Wabana prefer diplomacy and raiding to resolve conflict, the Veyaj have glorified warfare, seeing in it a necessary and glorious evil. Warfare amongst the Veyaj is a last resort, but when it occurs, entire tribes are eradicated and villages put to the torch. After all, if one doesn’t remove one’s enemies immediately, then they have the chance to do the same to you. As a result of these brutal and destructive traditions, a highly ritualized and organized system exists to prevent warfare, where champions of each village will meet first to discuss, then to wrestle, to resolve disputes.

    Some of the Obo, those who live along the shores of the Great Water, have diverged from their kin, taking to a more aquatic lifestyle, fishing and hunting the marine animals who make their home there. They are known as the Sapopo, The people of the water. They make boats out of skin and bone, and their dogs are bred for hunting on the water. They make jewelry out the bones of their dead, believing that the souls of their ancestors bring guidance, and that the souls of their dead enemies bring strength.



    The large flotillas that line the shore of the continent grow ever more complex, raft complexes and canoes visiting from the Ap in the west to the Agvan in the east, spreading technologies, goods, and genes.
     
  20. Thlayli

    Thlayli Le Pétit Prince

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    Tiryap 20XX: I Ran out of Animal Puns

    Kiryak people take to the seas in large canoes made from bones and cured sealskin, and sail up the coastline, hunting seals, tuna, and whatever else they can eat. Eventually they'll get blown over to the western continent and continue to live a relatively peaceful and migratory life, bringing more advanced technology to the West. If I can't have canoes, just give me whatever.

    Not so for the Akp.

    After institutionalizing a formal priesthood caste based around increasingly sophisticated human sacrifice rituals, the Akp swarm out of the mountains, killing and eating the innocuous lowland Obaho people. This variant of the Akp will be known as Echp. Eventually the Echp will grow used to living near the terror sea, and will begin to sail out on its bounteous waves, before a segment of them are blown across the ocean.

    They will exclusively hunt and kill as many of the locals as they can find for the sacrificial rituals to the snake god, the typical Tiryap berzerker genes growing more accentuated in their population. This trans-oceanic group will be called Chpkt. The Chpkt and the north-migrating Kiryak will also fight each other, but the more sedentary Chpkt will be content to occupy the interior while leaving the coasts to the boat people.

    The great genocide of Epua begins.

    The Tiryap retreat back into the Ypta mountains as they warm, returning to their ancient ways as they occupy the vales, far from the lowland fighting in the Itap. They are forced out by a combination of Ziag and Zyuzak, long related populations, who combine into the greater population of Ziyuzagh. The Ziyuzagh worship the mountain gods, placing large cairns atop the peaks. Their priests live atop the mountains, honoring the mountain gods with human sacrifices, as is the Tiryap-family tradition. With their newfound cultural unity, the Ziyuzagh will complete the elimination of the Ikzil and shatter the Tyumru, building a network of advanced tribal hunter-gatherer kingdoms under the collective arbitrage of the mountain-priests, who are able to convince multiple tribes to work together to oppose their foes.

    By the end of the period, the Ziyuzagh will be pushing into Gierhyep territory. The Ziyuzagh will also begin to create advanced and sophisticated wall-carvings in the vales of the mountain valleys, pseudo-symbolic and moving towards a pictographic writing system, though still thousands of years away. And their funerary traditions will become increasingly sophisticated, with large family groupings being interred together in the mountaintop cairns.
     

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