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Molecular Structures of the Alcohol Compounds

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by tuckerkao, Jul 29, 2020.

  1. tuckerkao

    tuckerkao King

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    Just downloaded this Chemistry software, wondering how large will the Alcohol molecules be able to expand?

    Methanol -
    Methanol.png

    Ethanol -
    Ethanol.png
     
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  2. Ajidica

    Ajidica High Quality Person

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    Have you tried expressing the values in dozenal?
     
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  3. tuckerkao

    tuckerkao King

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    Custom fonts are usually the hard part when using a new software. Convert those numbers from decimal to dozenal is way easier to me.

    Since General Chemistry in the 1st year of the University are well known to the general public, those basic molecular structures shouldn't be too hard. I could do those when I was even in high school.

    Propan-1-ol -
    Propan-1-ol.png

    Propan-2-ol -
    Propan-2-ol.png
     
  4. The_J

    The_J Say No 2 Net Validations Retired Moderator Supporter

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    Structures can go as long as you want them. Physiological relevant should be less than 20 though.
     
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  5. MrCynical

    MrCynical Deity

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    In theory you can make alcohols arbitrarily large. In practice the vast majority of the time in chemistry you're looking at butanols and smaller. I think octanol is the highest I've actually seen in a real application.

    Part of that is only having the alcohol group, and no other functionality. Plenty of larger molecules have an alcohol -OH in there somewhere, but because of loads of other functional groups we tend not to think of them as alcohols.

    Unless you're asking for the limits of the software, in which case, just try expanding the molecule till it crashes I guess.
     
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  6. Samson

    Samson Deity

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    Long chain alcohols are made from fatty acids. These Fatty alcohol's are used in the production of detergents, surfactants, cosmetics and some foodstuffs. Apparently "reports suggest that 5–20 mg per day of mixed C24–C34 alcohols, including octacosanol and triacontanol, lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL, "bad" cholesterol) cholesterol by 21%–29% and raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL, "good" cholesterol) by 8%–15%."

    There are also the sugar alcohols such as xylitol, that are used as non-insulin releasing sweeteners. These have multiple -OH groups, so are a bit different: formula for xylitol = HO(CH2)(CHOH)3(CH2)OH.
     
  7. IglooDude

    IglooDude Enforcing Rule 34 Retired Moderator Supporter

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    I once got some extra credit in high school chemistry for naming an absurdly large alcohol molecule, it had somewhere north of two hundred atoms. Good times.
     
  8. tuckerkao

    tuckerkao King

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    How about naming this large molecule which almost everybody on this Earth cares about?

    I checked the chiralities for the 3 specific carbons, made sure they matched -
    MolView Covid-19 Molecular Structure with the Spike Angle.png
     
  9. IglooDude

    IglooDude Enforcing Rule 34 Retired Moderator Supporter

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    I don't remember how, so hang on while I see if I have my chemistry textbook from 1986...

    Yeah, nope.
     
  10. MrCynical

    MrCynical Deity

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    Structure search offers:

    ethyl 5-(2-oxopyrrolidin-3-yl)-4-[[3-phenyl-2-(phenylmethoxycarbonylamino)propanoyl]amino]pentanoate

    i.e. too big for the systematic naming approach to be particularly useful. Care to let us in on the significance? It looks like a mimic for a 3 or 4 amino acid peptide sequence. Some similarity to various protease inhibitors, but doesn't match anything obvious, assuming you've drawn it correctly.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020
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  11. The_J

    The_J Say No 2 Net Validations Retired Moderator Supporter

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    2 phenylalanine and a pyrimidine... heck, no clue, probably not relevant for my research area.

    Edit: so that's then neither DNA or protein, also none of the major hormones :dunno:.
     
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  12. tuckerkao

    tuckerkao King

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    Whenever I see the Nitrogen bonds locate in the middle and adjacent to a -one group(C=O double bond), that's likely to involve the future mutation of the virus.

    I particular want to learn the names of all the possible isomers including enantiomers and diastereomers of the common molecules. I just like the IUPAC naming system of the organic chemistry a lot because it gives me the potential to name large numbers in many different math bases probably all of them that are not too big.

    The molecular isomers have the identical chemical formula but distinct arrangements of the atoms in the space.

    The numerical isomers have the identical absolute quantity but are expressed in distinct math bases, thus have the different names -

    Numerical Isomers for Octal 21 and Decimal 17 and Dozenal 15.png
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020
  13. The_J

    The_J Say No 2 Net Validations Retired Moderator Supporter

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    ..err... what?

    I hope you mean pure alcohols, because otherwise you will very fast have too many compounds :lol: (.e.g. sugars... oh boy).
    Actually, even with alcohols...
     
  14. Ferocitus

    Ferocitus Deity

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  15. MrCynical

    MrCynical Deity

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    These structures are peptide bonds, and are a basic feature of any protein backbone.

    "involve a future mutation of the virus" :confused:

    It's hard to know where to begin with the multiple layers of misunderstanding there. This is not the structure of any viral protein or nucleic acid sequence where the concept of mutation makes sense. It has nothing to do with Covid, or indeed any other virus as far as I can tell.

    The number of possible isomers of even quite small molecules can be absurdly large.
     
  16. tuckerkao

    tuckerkao King

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    There are diol alcohol compounds: methanediol, ethan-1-1-diol, ethan-1-2-diol, ethen-1-1-diol, E-ethen-1-2-diol (trans), Z-ethen-1-2-diol (cis), ethynediol.

    If the entire molecule isn't a virus, then that protein part will be okay. The molecular graph I posted was the original Covid strain from Wuhan, China. The Italian strain had the spikes mutated, the benzyl head was swapped with the nitrogen + one(C=O) bonded area, then the virus became more infectious.
     
  17. Ferocitus

    Ferocitus Deity

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    The red, white and blue atoms make me think it's either Putine, Trumpene or hydroxychloroquine.
     
  18. MrCynical

    MrCynical Deity

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    This sentence is roughly equivalent to saying "If the entire brick isn't a house then the kitchen part will be OK". It's not so much a case of being wrong as not understanding what the words you are using actually mean.

    The structure you've posted is of a small molecule, not a virus or a component of any virus. I'm not sure where you got the impression this molecule was "the original Covid strain" or anything related to it.

    To put things in perspective, a single "spike" protein of Covid consists of thousands of atoms. The outer protein case of a single virus particle is composed of many copies of these spike proteins, along with many copies of other similarly complex proteins. Inside that case are around 30,000 bases of the virus' genetic code, with each base consisting of a few dozen atoms.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020
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  19. thetrooper

    thetrooper Schweinhund

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    I'm with the cynic. Too small.
     
  20. tuckerkao

    tuckerkao King

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    The several molecules I looked and drew were the main protease and the key enzyme of the coronavirus, I'm sure I haven't included the RNA chains which will be too large for my software.
     

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