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More Civilisations

Discussion in 'Civ5 - New Civilizations' started by Pouakai, Apr 23, 2013.

  1. Mingel

    Mingel Warlord

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2015
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    192
    Location:
    Serbia
    DarthStarkiller to be honest i expected Yugoslavia in JFD'S WW2 civs with Tito as leader and Partisan as UU and some building probabbly for second unique component. For Peter I as i know from history probabby is unique artillery and GG or Great war infantry. Because Serbia stoped much larger AU army i will give some boost on fighting in friendly land and not like Ethiopia (if had more cities bonus) bonus on fighting with larger army.Also from history Serbia retreat true North Albania to Greece,then coming back with French troops. I think Pouakai can think something interesting for Serbia WW1 UA. For decisions i really don't have idea.
     
  2. Hoop Thrower

    Hoop Thrower Cyberbolivarian Inkarri

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2013
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    2,487
    Location:
    Chile
    You pretty much described the civilizations of DJSHenniger right there.
     
  3. Gyra Solune

    Gyra Solune King

    Joined:
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    942
    Oh oh ohhhh okay makes sense. Well, we do tend to share civ pedia entries when alt leaders are involved so if JFD doesn't have his own then here it is as well!

    Serbia's pedia:

    Spoiler :

    History
    Forged in the early middle ages by Slavic migrations, Serbia lies at the heart of Southeast Europe, its fortunes shared by many of its neighbors as outside empires sought to hold the crossroads of Europe for themselves. In this region, Serbia has been at the forefront of affairs, first as a powerful kingdom during the Middle Ages, then, following Ottoman rule, as one of the premier Balkan states, in the center of the web of alliances that led to the first Great War. Waxing and waning throughout the twentieth century, today Serbia has emerged from war and dissolution as a developed aspirant to the European Union.

    Geography and Climate
    Located in the center of the crossroads from Central to Southern Europe, landlocked Serbia has some of the most diverse terrain in all of Europe. Fertile and temperate plains cover the northern third of the country, becoming more hilly and rugged to the south, with the most southerly reaches dominated by untamed mountains. Serbia boasts some of the highest biodiversity in Europe, but is also among the most prone to natural disasters. Its temperature ranges from bitterly cold winters caused by the intense Košava winds, to warmer and more arid climates akin to other Mediterranean nations.

    Early History
    Among the most significant facets of Serbia's earliest history is the presence of the Neolithic Vinča culture, one of the most extensive and developed pre-Indo-European cultures. After its decline, the region was largely defined by the advancing Greeks under Alexander the Great, and the various peoples in conflict with them, such as the Illyrians and Thracians. By 75 BC, the Roman Empire had conquered the region, firmly establishing it under the provinces of Dalmatia and Moesia, turning it into one of their core areas of stability. Even after the split and subsequent collapse of the Western Roman Empire, Serbia remained under Byzantine influence, whereupon migrating Slavic people began to call the region home.

    Middle Ages
    During the seventh to ninth centuries AD, the Serbian Principality was formed, for the first time establishing the Serbian people as a sovereign realm. At this point, friction with the invading Bulgar was the primary concern of the Principality, and in 924, faced with a Serbian alliance with Byzantium, Časlav Klonimirović of the Bulgars invaded and annexed Serbia, ending the first Principality. Upon his death, the Balkans grew unstable, led by petty lords and switching between Bulgar and Byzantine hands, until in 1090 when the Serbian Grand Principality was reinstated, elevated to Kingdom status in 1217 by Grand Prince Stefan Nemanja. Together with his son, who he installed as the first King of Serbia, Nemanja is often considered the father of the Serbian nation, and was canonized by the Serbian Orthodox Church after his death.

    During this time, as Byzantium began to falter, Serbia flourished, steadily expanding southwards even when war on many fronts faced down the kingdom. In 1331, Stefan Dušan overthrew his father and established the Serbian Empire, coming to dominate nearly all of the Balkans and marking a golden age of Serbian prosperity. As the Byzantine Empire collapsed in the wake of the Turkish invasions, Dušan sought to make Serbia a new successor to Roman tradition, and to make himself the new Byzantine Emperor. However, in 1355, Dušan died of sudden illness while on the march to capture Constantinople. This, combined with the advancing Turks and the weakness of his son, caused the complete collapse of Serbia as it was soon completely conquered by the Ottoman Empire just a century later.

    Ottoman Rule and Independence
    As the buffer zone between the constantly clashing Habsburgs and Ottomans, Serbia was a land of strife and chaos for most of the next few centuries. Most of its inhabitants became serfs of an inferior class under Ottoman law, prompting the Great Exodus, a mass migration of Serbs to the Habsburg realm. Throughout the later Middle Ages into the early modern times, most of the Balkans were a shifting frontier between larger powers. But during the early 1800s, Serbians made numerous attempts to reclaim their sovereignty, starting with two uprisings led by Karađorđe Petrović and Obrenović from 1804 to 1815. Struggling at first, the Serbians were vastly outnumbered by Ottoman forces, but during the Great Eastern Crisis that devastated the Ottomans permanently, Serbia managed to acquire peace and sovereignty, eventually leading to globally recognized independence during the 1878 Congress of Berlin. The nation continued to push against the faltering Ottoman Empire as the central force of the Balkan League, and emerged even larger when the League collapsed and Serbia found itself against previously allied Bulgaria. It was during this time that Peter I Karađorđević was in power, and the earliest years of the 20th century were marked as a golden age for Serbia, its territory greatly expanded, its policies and culture hitting a marked high point.

    World War I
    Despite its successes, Serbia was the epicenter of what was described as the 'powder keg of Europe'. Russian allegiances and treaties in the Balkans destabilized the area, any move certain to resound throughout the web of agreements woven across the continent. In June of 1914, exactly this happened: Gavrilo Princip, a pan-Serbian nationalist revolutionary, assassinated Austro-Hungarian heir Archduke Franz Ferdinand while he was in Sarajevo. Though the archduke was unpopular, Austrian officials decided to take the opportunity to justify war against Serbia, delivering the unreasonable July Ultimatum. When only one of the ten demands was refused, Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, who was then allied with the Russian Empire, who proceeded to mobilize against Austria-Hungary. Germany, knowing France had military agreements with Russia, issued its own ultimatum to the French, who agreed to withdraw but began mobilizing its own reserves, prompting Germany to attack Belgium and Luxembourg, then France as well. As Belgium's neutrality was enforced by the British, soon Great Britain declared war on Germany in August, and in the span of barely more than a month, all the Great Powers of Europe and their global holdings were engulfed in what came to be known as the Great War.

    The war was characterized by months, if not years, of impenetrable trench warfare, only broken much later by usage of gas warfare and the invention of the battle tank. Serbia, while allied with France, Great Britain, and Russia, was in between the Central allies of Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, and the Ottoman Empire, and comparatively small. Surrounded on all sides by greater foes, Serbia was conquered within the year, more than a quarter of its pre-war population dying in combat, its survivors increasingly pushed farther and farther south to Greece. Near the end of the war, Serbian forces joined with French support and reclaimed the abandoned Balkan front - by which point, most of the fighting was concentrated between the United States and Germany. With the collapse of Austria-Hungary by the end of World War I, some of its former territories merged with Serbia to create the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, officially named such by the son of Peter I, Alexander the Unifier, in 1929.

    Yugoslavia
    The first World War left southeastern Europe stricken with poverty and debt. The vast majority of Yugoslavia's populace were farming peasants in dry or hilly terrain, with little to no mechanization, and very little other industry to speak of. With ethnic conflicts straining the nation, the Great Depression coerced Yugoslavia to become a dependent of Nazi Germany. King Alexander established autocracy of the king in 1931, only to be assassinated three years later. The king's cousin, Prince Paul, headed the regency council for Alexander's child king, and pledged formal allegiance to the growing Axis powers in 1941. With massive protests sweeping Yugoslavia, Paul was overthrown by a British coup just two days afterwards. Subsequent withdrawal of Axis support led to a German invasion just a few weeks later, and Yugoslavia remained divided between Axis territories with the royalty in exile for the remainder of World War II. Loyalist resistance groups continued to fight occupation, but gradually Allied support shifted from them to the more powerful Partisans under Joseph Broz Tito.

    Though formally it was the monarchy who had been restored to power following the war, Tito's Communist Partisans held true control over Yugoslavia, and in late November 1945, the king was formally deposed, and Tito established the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. Despite Tito's Communist policies and initial alignment with Joseph Stalin, Tito split from the Soviet bloc with ambitions of unifying Eastern Europe under his own influence, and became instrumental in founding the Non-Aligned Movement. Despite this, a threat of Soviet invasion prompted Tito to align more closely with the United States, who shipped aid and weaponry in the hopes of turning Yugoslavia into the front line of defense against the Iron Curtain. Over the next three decades, Tito enacted sweeping reforms, developing the economy at a rapid pace while granting increased autonomy to the Republic's constituents. On the whole, Yugoslavia was a success at becoming an intermediary between the East and West blocs, occupying an important strategic geopolitical location during the Cold War. Though Tito was among the more globally popular Communist authoritarian leaders, in 1980, he died at the age of 87, and Yugoslavia was soon to break apart.

    Dissolution and the Modern Day
    The republic was plagued with problems during the end of the 20th century, with ethnic and economic tensions tearing at the nation. Finally, by 1991, warfare marred the Balkans as Yugoslavia's constituents violently broke from each other in Europe's deadliest conflict since World War II, lasting through the decade. The Yugoslav Wars took the lives of thousands: in Serbia (then established as the state union of Serbia and Montenegro, breaking in 2006), this was most highlighted by the Kosovo Wars, as the former semi-autonomous region declared independence, which has not yet been resolved today despite greater European support in favor of Kosovo. Despite such recent violence and ongoing territorial disputes, the largest in Europe, Serbia is still one of the prime applicants for expansion of the European Union, and has settled from the chaos that plagued the Balkans into modest stability. It is likely, however, that joining the European Union within the coming decade will settle the Kosovo dispute, and hopefully bring the perennially troubled region greater prosperity for the future.

    Factoids
    Famed inventor Nikola Tesla, best known for the creation of the AC electric supply system that is now a global standard, was a Serbian (though born in modern Croatia, at the time part of Austria-Hungary) born in 1856.

    Serbia is the world's second largest producer of plums, second only to China.

    More Roman Emperors were born in Serbian provinces than anywhere except Italy itself.

     
  4. Pouakai

    Pouakai It belongs in a museum. Moderator

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    Awesome, looking good so far. Would it be possible to get a bit of detail on WW1 when you get to it, given it's a WW1 civ?
     
  5. Gyra Solune

    Gyra Solune King

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    Oh of course yeah, there's just going to be a little blurb on Ottoman rule, then somewhat bigger sections for WWI and Yugoslavian years. Like I said the community tends to have these things shared and so I figure it can be multipurposed for the major bits, hence more detail on medieval stuff there.
     
  6. Gyra Solune

    Gyra Solune King

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    Just finished the one for Serbia itself. Peter's will be a lot shorter considering that very pedia thing is longer than the wikipedia article for the guy, should be all set tomorrow.
     
  7. Mingel

    Mingel Warlord

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    Location:
    Serbia
    Gyra man,you really do awesome job with Serbia wiki.
     
  8. margustoo

    margustoo Warlord

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    Aug 22, 2014
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    Location:
    Tallinn, Estonia
    Calusa is my new favorite civ :)
     
  9. Gyra Solune

    Gyra Solune King

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    Mega belatedly, Peter's pedia thingy!

    Spoiler :

    History
    Peter I Karađorđević was one of Serbia's greatest rulers, bringing a country that had fallen on trying times to a shining golden age in the early 20th century. He rose from a prince in exile to a revolutionary hero, and recovered the country's fortunes after the Great Eastern Crisis, and uniting the Balkans into the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. Though his reign was short and cut off by illness, he is nonetheless remembered as a hero of the Serbian people.

    Early Life
    Born in 1844 in Belgrade, Peter was born to the then reigning Prince Alexander Karađorđević. Their rival house, the Obrenović family, were oft clashing heads with that of Karađorđević, and the refusal of Serbia to join the Crimean War against Russia tipped the scales It was in 1858, when Peter was fourteen years old, that Miloš Obrenović I seized power, forcing Alexander to abdicate, his family exiled from the country.

    Exile
    As a young adult, Peter spent much of his time in Geneva and parts of France, studying at the Parisian École Spéciale Militaire de Saint-Cyr. At the age of 26, he served as an irregular during the Franco-Prussian War, with following service in the elite 1st Foreign Regiment of the Foreign Legion.

    In 1875, a Serbian uprising against the Ottomans kicked off the Great Eastern Crisis. Peter adopted the name Petar Mrkonjić and joined the Serbian insurgency, and began gaining popularity, to the point where Prince Milan Obrenović ordered Peter to leave for fear of losing the throne. Marrying Princess Zorka of Montenegro, Peter raised five children in the country for ten years, until the death of the princess prompted him to move the family to Switzerland.

    Rise to Power
    Finally, in 1903, at 59 years of age, Peter reclaimed the Serbian throne, following a coup against Alexander I Obrenović and his family. Popular both amongst the citizens and the nobility, Peter followed in the footsteps of modern politics from France and Switzerland, and molded Serbia into a constitutional monarchy in their image. It was a great success, and for the next 11 years, Serbia saw a golden age like none it had known before, with unprecedented freedom of press and cultural growth. Known to champion the ideal of a pan-Slavic nation, Peter enjoyed popularity for success in the Balkan Wars, where Serbia expanded through victory over long-bitter rivals.

    World War I
    By the outbreak of World War I, Peter had passed his royal duties to his son, Crown Prince Alexander, due to age and declining health. Despite this, he remained in the public eye, a symbol bolstering Serbian morale during the war by frequently visiting soldiers in the front lines - on one occasion even picking up a rifle to shoot down enemy soldiers. However, by the next year Serbia was overrun on all sides, and Peter led the retreating Serbian forces through Albania, where their French allies transported his government in exile to Corfu for the remainder of World War I. The journey had killed many and left the king in poor health. When the war ended in 1818, Peter was declared king of a unified Yugoslavia, fulfilling his ambitions - but he did not enjoy it for long, for in 1921 he died in Belgrade, at the age of 77.

    Legacy
    Peter I is undoubtedly one of the most celebrated figures in Serbian history, leading the ever-tumultuous region into an age of progress and prosperity. He brought modern ideals of liberty to people who had long lived under foreign conquerors, and served as a symbol of hope during the country's darkest hour at the nexus of one of the deadliest conflicts in global history. His ambition of a Yugoslavian nation lasted with moderate success throughout the next decade, but unfortunately it was not meant to be, and dissolved in the late 1990s. Still, a century later, peace and stability has come to Serbia, even if it has come with fracturing war, and with luck, the coming century will see even greater tranquility for its people.



    Now do you need like, the DoM? And what all are the uniques? Might as well take care of those too, they ought to be shorter, usually just a slightly lengthier paragraph.
     
  10. Pouakai

    Pouakai It belongs in a museum. Moderator

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    Awesome, both of them look great - thanks for your hard work. DoM is still needed for them, as are both UU pedias. DoM is probably more pressing though, so that I can get it sent off for recording. If you wanted, the Greek civs still need pedias too and there's a fair bit of work there to be done, so making a dent in that would be awesome too
     
  11. Mingel

    Mingel Warlord

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2015
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    192
    Location:
    Serbia
    Pouakai as i get, for Peter I code is done? Only pedias for BOTH UU missing, and Dom? Artwork is done,a and by who ? Jan? I really appreciate all your hard work and thank you for that! And if dont ask much can you tell us something about UA or UU just to entertain us more ? :))
     
  12. Nuriel

    Nuriel Chieftain

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2015
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    6
    Location:
    Toruń, Poland
    Few questions about Slavs:

    1. Does UA work as intended? I've garrisoned my starting warrior but didn't got any extra faith (except from Cultural Diversity opole). My freshly built scout also doesn't get any extra experience (except from Cultural Diversity barracks).

    2. Second unique decision (Organize Votchina laws) also doesn'work - can't be enacted. I don't know maybe because I've had two free walls in the empire (first from starting bonus, second from Great Wall).

    Besides, really nice civ and all those defensive bonus are pretty historically accurate too (those Polabians cities built on lakes in the middle of forests and marches were really hard to conquer ;-), but personally, I would've nerf a little bit bonuses from Opole - pantheon on turn 3 and +7 gold? Of course assuming that you are using Cultural Diversity mod, but still, have strong incentive to build Opole right away in newly founded cities - you in facto gain combined bonuses from temple and marketplace ;-)
     
  13. Pouakai

    Pouakai It belongs in a museum. Moderator

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    Code is being finished up, we still need the leaderhead and one of the decisions (along with any events, though I doubt we'll have any.) Other than that, we mainly need to finalise the themes, get the DoM recorded and write up the last pedias (including one for the replacement City state)
     
  14. Gyra Solune

    Gyra Solune King

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    Here's a DOM then.

    Spoiler :

    All hail Peter I of House Karađorđević, favored king of Serbia. Thrown into exile at a young age, you seized opportunity to claim back your throne, and brought your weary people into an age of enlightenment. Though the first World War brought turmoil to Serbia, you led as many of your soldiers as possible to safety, and upon the war's end, at last managed to achieve your dream - that of a unified Yugoslavia, even if you did not live long enough to see it rise.

    Oh glorious king, the Serbian people once more call out for a just and righteous king, one who can rise to the occasion and champion liberty. Will you ascend beyond centuries of strife and occupation? Can you usher in an everlasting golden age for your citizens? Can you build a civilization that stands the test of time?


    I mean, Peter I's not anywhere on the modopedia so I don't actually know what the uniques are ^^ Oh, and what City-State is replacing Belgrade?
     
  15. Mingel

    Mingel Warlord

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    Pouakai can we expect Serbia and Greece split before new year ?
     
  16. Pouakai

    Pouakai It belongs in a museum. Moderator

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    The DoM is a bit short, but could definitely work it into a bigger one, cheers. As for the city state, I kind of want to make it Pristina just because the steam comments will be hilarious, though I think Durazzo or Trieste would be a better choice.

    Not sure whether they'll be out before the end of the year - I'd like to get them done by then, but with Christmas in retail I'm working 50 hour weeks and have barely any time. Meanwhile Jan is completely burnt out and I don't want to force him to work on stuff he isn't motivated to do, and Greece still requires a tonne of text and other stuff before it's ready.
     
  17. Mingel

    Mingel Warlord

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    Location:
    Serbia
    Once again thank you for doing Serbia WW1 civ,i'm glad that didn't end up just as project, now if it comes in 5 days or 2 months it doesn't matter, and as i would like to see it in 5 days, it's better to take longer time but to be really good done, for good things need time.
     
  18. DarthStarkiller

    DarthStarkiller King

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    I'd go with Pristina. If anything, it can be changed to Trieste once Our World eventually releases Kosovo.
     
  19. Guillelmus

    Guillelmus Chieftain

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    Oct 11, 2015
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    For some reason the Calusa aren't appearing on YNAEMP v.23 for me, even though they do appear on normal maps, and the Tuscans appear normally on YNAEMP v.23. Strange, since they do have mod support for YNAEMP...
     
  20. Natan35

    Natan35 Mayor of St. Natansburg

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    Speaking of the Calusa, as I might've mentioned earlier, they need a nerf. Especially the decisions: every tile with a road gets +1 culture and +1 production, its kinda insane.
     

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