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Non commercial economy

Discussion in 'Civ4Col - Strategy & Tips' started by pvt chaos, Sep 25, 2008.

  1. ddd123

    ddd123 Chieftain

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    i loved the trade routes of anno 1701

    still in the games i played till now i just did like 4 5 wagons max of which just 1 free i moved occasioanlly to move stuff, rest was automatized on the way

    and i about never edited or changed a trade rout going

    if i need more wood instead of adding a new traderoute i just added a woodcutter, or improved the terrain or trained a specialist, the few routes i use are planned from the start i usually dont even move tools to the towns

    still the system could be improved but its not so ugly
     
  2. magwea

    magwea Chieftain

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    Its definitely playable and works fine, although it mightn't be the most efficient strategy. My first game was with Bolivar on explorer difficulty at normal speed was an easy enough win.

    Some quick pointers: Training does become ******** very quickly and requires for sight particularly for elder statesmen. There are only so many specialists you can train. Occasionally your also going to be pushed for gold, and were trading with the natives is not going to be enough. I usually get one of the free specialists to produce some goods for a turn or two if i'm really stuck.

    I went with firebrand preachers and cathedrals from the start to get as many cross settlers as possible, this will also become ******** very quickly.

    Build one university in one city only before training any unit specialists, further schools are crap since the negative modifiers apply through-put.

    Missionaries and training among the natives is a god send.

    Food is much more important, although as a resource it is much more inefficient than getting tradeable goods.

    The major disadvantage i saw was that it was impossible, for me at least, to get all the specialists i wanted with certain settlements not running at max efficiency, plenty of converted natives and the like. That being said beating the REF was easy with massive stockpiles of weapons and horses in my armies of wagon trains. The funny thing is that this seems like a normal strategy, one of the normal ways of laying the game and not an expliot. Also its great fun sticking it to the King everytime.

     
  3. pvt chaos

    pvt chaos Chieftain

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    I found an efficient way for faster increase, just let your wagon trains collect the excess food of all the colonies and drop it off in your food city. This way you will give an enormous boost to population growth. Better have one colony with massive growth than 10 colonies which all have a growth of +1 food.
     
  4. magwea

    magwea Chieftain

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    Yeah, i had wised up to wagoning all my food to one city and thus getting faster population growth. Still on a per unit basis food isn't as good as some trade able resource. Even if i can get growth every few turns.
     
  5. pvt chaos

    pvt chaos Chieftain

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    If you compare food to for example rum, than indeed rum prevails. But this is in the early game. Later in the game your rum will be taxed more and more, giving you less and less money.
    The food yield doesnt diminish and you can even increase it more with one of the founding fathers. And dont forget the fact that if you declared independence you cant trade with Europe anymore unless you chose for Monarchy.
     
  6. Feannag

    Feannag Chieftain

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    I have tried to make several specialty colonies, seeing if that helps. My projected plan.

    The Bread Basket

    - Find a good place full of flat land and food friendly terrain and plop it down. Have pioneer make farms on every single square and get an all farmer populace going.

    - Once you get 8 farmers and all farms, without anyone else inside, it should produce so much surplus it'll be popping out colonists left and right.

    - Building queue for any FF points you need, since it won't have to build anything more.

    The Supplier

    - Find a spot with mountains, hills, and maybe a nice forest or two and plop down there. Build mines and lodges, and send in lumberjacks and ore/silver miners.

    - Setup a trade route to truck out all the ore and lumber.

    - You may have to send them food as well, but once the population is stable you could most likely setup a trade route to truck in the min. food needed to avoid starvation.

    - Building queue can be again FF points since you won't need to build anything.

    The Factory

    - Plop down another colony close to both The Supplier and The Bread Basket, and send in carpenters and blacksmiths. You may want some food-friendly squares and famers/fishermen for this, since the bulk of the population will be indoors.

    - Using all the lumber/ore from the Supplier build up production facilities for hammers and tools and guns.

    - You may want to start with the hammer-producing first, since that will ultimately bring down the turn cost to make the rest.

    - If the Factory is on the coast, make sure to include a Shipyard to create ships as needed. Privateers are always welcome for attacking other ships and stealing their cargo.

    Harvard

    - Look for a spot to sustain food and lumber, nothing else is really needed.

    - Truck in one of each specialist you want more of. Carpenters, Blacksmiths, Gunsmiths, Lumberjacks, and Ore Miners are usually at the time. Firebrand Preachers work too and Veteran Soldiers if you have the time.

    - Build a university, and outside the specialists truck in the free colonists and keep the university full. Once someone graduates send them to the colony that needs them most. Truck in free colonists from the Bread Basket as needed.

    I'm sure you can apply this to specific good chains. But ultimately the goal is to streamline production of tools, weapons, and cannons. You may need to find a carpenter or two to truck around to each one to build . .. .. .. . as needed in a timely fashion.
     
  7. pvt chaos

    pvt chaos Chieftain

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    I tried this approach too, and it definetly works. Only problem is I like to build alot of colonies and then it becomes a pain to transport everything around. Now I usually build only one or 2 food colonies , a Harvard colony (usually my initial one) and the rest are all self sustaining. So every colony produces its own lumber,tools and guns as much as possible.
    In the event of a REF invasion I have to worry less about my suply chain being cutt of.
     
  8. magwea

    magwea Chieftain

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    In my last game i effectively only had 3 settlements for the entire game with each almost running independently of each other. Each village was producing enough or just about enough resources for my specialists with wagons moving around any surplus, all were maxed out with upgraded buildings by the time the REF arrived.

    My early game focus was solely on food, followed by crosses which on becoming ineffective were quickly booted to my universities, lumber/carpenters, ore/blacksmith, gunsmiths, newspapers/elder statesmen. Training horses seemed a bit to expensive food wise so i only did that half heartedly in the late game.
     
  9. pvt chaos

    pvt chaos Chieftain

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    Horses are usually bred in one of my food colonies and once stocked to the max with horses Im trading or giving them away to the native's. Combined with roads to their village's this gives you a nice "cavalry ally".
     
  10. magwea

    magwea Chieftain

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    Before i began stockpiling my weapons on wagon trains I just dumped all my unwanted weapons on the natives and bought their loyalty with the money they gave me for them. Not that arming the natives is much use against the REF.
     
  11. pvt chaos

    pvt chaos Chieftain

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    Not in small numbers, but if all the tribe's rally behind your cause I found that they can become a nice ally. Every little bit helps in defeating the REF.
     
  12. Pope John 1

    Pope John 1 Chieftain

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    These are some really great ideas. Thanks to all of you for posting them. I had already figured out the part about moving all excess food to a single colony to mass-produce free colonists, but some of these other tips will really be useful.

    One thing I didn't see mentioned was roads -- I find that two pioneers, hopefully one of them a Hardy Pioneer, working together can connect colonies with roads in a very short time. Amazing how fast wagon trains can move over long distances when you have roads. I also discovered that horses are pretty cheap in the early game, so I like to stock up on them and make sure all the colonies have a supply before I start building stables.

    Once you have a few hundred gold, you can also buy finished goods (rum, cloth, cigars) from certain tribes and resell them in Europe. The tribes sell them cheaper than what Europe pays, but just to make sure of your profit you should use a calculator. You can make a few hundred extra on a full shipment by adding this to your own production, but of course once the taxes start to kick in, it's a losing proposition, so do it early.
     
  13. tour86rocker

    tour86rocker Chieftain

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    Indians help you? They don't help me even when they're armed and have declared war against my king. Hmm.
     
  14. pvt chaos

    pvt chaos Chieftain

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    I think so far the most important aspect in a non commercial game is to save your money and really think on what to spent it.

    It happened too often on me that I was training a colonist into a statesmen and I didnt have the gold. The game forces you to choose a profession, with no option to wait a turn before graduation. You then end up with a lousy fisherman instead of your desired statesman and have wasted valuable education points.
     
  15. Feannag

    Feannag Chieftain

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    Last game I tried was on the coast, five water squares and three land squares, one of which was fish (+4 food). A nearby settlement trained fishermen. Any free colonist or below I sent there to train. After getting a dock and drydock up, they were making SO MUCH food I was getting a new colonist every 5 - 6 turns.

    For those coastal towns, the dock facilities do more than let you build ships. With a shipyard you get +3 food per water square. I'm not sure if that doubles from a specialist but it's still a lot of food.
     
  16. Karhgath

    Karhgath Chieftain

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    I think I have a trick for that. Select the "check settlement" option and switch the colonist in the school to another slot. When you get the cash later on, move it back and I think it keeps his previous tally, I believe I did that once, but I could have a bad memory.
     
  17. obsolete

    obsolete Chieftain

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    Umm, no. Upgrading a dock to a Dry dock does not give you an additional food! And Shipyard does not give you +3 addition. In fact, it doesn't even give you +3.

    You need to pay attention. Each one replaces the other. If it really stacked, it would be overpowered and no one would ever settle in-land.
     
  18. MasterDinadan

    MasterDinadan Chieftain

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    Buying colonists is generally more efficient than making crosses late in the game.
    Buying cannons is efficient unless your planning on making a lot of them.
    Buying tools is WAY more efficient than making them, especially early in the game.
    Horses need to be bought. Breeding them is woefully inefficient.

    The point is that money helps you achieve many of the goals that need to be achieved, and in most cases it is actually more efficient to make a good, sell it, and buy what you need... rather than just making every single thing you need.

    Specialization is key. If you specialize in a single product, you can produce it very quickly and make a lot of money. Then you just buy the things you need instead of wasting your colonists and resources producing them at a less efficient rate.
     
  19. tour86rocker

    tour86rocker Chieftain

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    MD, you're probably right about crosses being less effective in the late game, perhaps even the middle game. I hope that will be tweaked soon.

    But crosses don't become totally useless. Once you declare Independence, if you choose Theocracy (I think I'm naming the right one) to change crosses to hammers, take a look at your hammers and you'll probably find that it's more beneficial to put colonists on churches for hammers. That's if you declare independence and still have, say, cannons that need building.

    I wonder if they intended for this to make the preacher produce more hammers than carpenters?
     
  20. magwea

    magwea Chieftain

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    Sure MasterDinadan, the point that its playable at all was what surprised me. I don't care if its the most efficient way of doing it.

    Heck, if you are only going to go for efficency why not play like Turinturambar, winning the game at 98 turns on the hardest difficulty without ever producing a processed good.
     

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