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Pontus, The Scourge of the Diadochi

Discussion in 'Civ4 - Stories & Tales' started by Arquebuse, Jul 27, 2017.

  1. Arquebuse

    Arquebuse Chieftain

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    Pontus, The Scourge of the Diadochi
    Mithridates’s family had ruled the town of Kios in Mysia for generations, and although Persian by blood, his family was always more loyal to the Hellenes. His grandfather had revolted against the Achaemenid King Artaxerxes II at the request of his Hellene subjects and his father was a great supporter of Alexandros of Makedonia. It was 11 years ago that Mithridates’s father was executed. The Vasileos, Antigonos, had the nobleman murdered under suspicion that he would betray him and join the league of Cassandros. Thusly Cassandros and his confederates would be able to safely cross the Bosporos and invade the kingdom of Antigonos from the West. Following the death of his beloved father, Mithridates was warned by the son of Antigonos that his execution was imminent as well. The young Mithridates then left his home of Kios and fled the realm of Antigonos. He soon was invited to the Hellene colony of Sinope in Paphlagonia by its tyrant, Scydrothermis. With the help of Lydian mercenaries, the Uazali, Mithridates has overthrown the tyrant and declared himself Vasileos of Pontos. The Hellenic colonies and Anatolian villages of Paphlagonia have rallied to embrace the new ruler and his distaste of the Antigonids. Although the Kingdom of Pontos is small and weak, Mithridates foresees a great future for his new home.

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  2. Arquebuse

    Arquebuse Chieftain

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    Mithridates I: The Unification of Pontos

    When Alexandros the Great died without an heir, his grand empire was divided between his friends, generals, and family members. Conflict quickly broke out between these Diadochi, all wanting to rebuild the empire of their predecessor. By the time of Mithridates’s ascent to the throne of Pontos, three great powers had emerged from these Wars of the Diadochi. The Antigonids spread from Cilicia in the East to Ionia in the West and Bithynia in the North to Lykia in the South. The Seleucids controlled Mesopotamia, Syria and much of the lands to the East. Lastly, the Ptolemies controlled Aegyptos and Livye. Other, less powerful Diadochi still held on to their kingdoms such as Lysimachos in Thrace, Cassandros in Makedonia, Pyrros in Epirus, and Antipatros in Hellas. Meanwhile the neutral city states of Rodos and Chersonesos prospered by supplying the warring factions with grain to feed their massive armies.
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    With the death of Antigonos and the ascent of his son, Demetrios, the relations between Pontos and the Antigonids calmed. Mithridates rejoiced at the death of his father’s murderer and opened talks with his savior, friend, and new ruler of the Antigonid Kingdom.
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    With the establishment of the Kingdom of Pontos, the Uazali mercenaries pledged themselves to Mithridates’s service. The Vasileos promptly ordered them East, under the command of his son Ariovarzanes, to conquer and pacify the rest of the Pontic coast.
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    The army eventually reached the Hellene colony of Trapezous. When the local tyrant refused to submit to Ariovarzanes, the Pontic army moved in and took the town by force. The Uazali fared well in battle, but the hit and run tactics of the Phrygian skirmishers proved too sluggish for the city garrison’s archers and nearly five thousand men were lost in the battle.
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    Still, Ariovarzanes and his men were able to capture Trapezous for the kingdom. The captured enemy soldiers and the court of the tyrant were pressed into slavery. They were then sent West to Sinope to work on the Vasileos’s construction projects.
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    Mosaic of Uazali Mercenaries Celebrating the Capture of Trapezous


    Mithridates died of disease in his palace at Sinope at 48 years of age. Ariovarzanes, upon hearing the news of his father’s passing, returned to Sinope and was coronated in the month of Maimakterion in the 3rd year of the 128th Olympiad.
     
  3. ChineseWarlord

    ChineseWarlord Chieftain

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  4. Gruekiller

    Gruekiller Back From The Beyond

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  5. Arquebuse

    Arquebuse Chieftain

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    Ariovarzanes: The Antigonid Golden Age

    Parallel Ariovarzanes’s ascent to the throne, the new Vasileos of the Antigonids, Antigonos II, was crowned and began his campaigns to the West. He quickly conquered the Kingdom of Thrake with the capture of Byzantion and the execution of the Vasileos Ptolemy.
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    The slaves captured during the conquest of Pontos were gathered in Sinope. Ariovarzanes then ordered to have them construct a grand temple to the god Mithra, in honor of his late father. Many slaves perished during an exceptionally cold winter, but the temple was completed earlier than planned. The remaining slaves were ordered to help build a large agora at the base of the city’s acropolis.
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    Fresco of Mithras Slaying the Bull from Sinope's Mithratic Temple


    Pontos had been paying inflated prices for Tauric grain for its growing population for decades. With the chaos in Thrake due to the Antigonid invasion, grain prices only continued to rise and the mere act of feeding the people of the kingdom began to take a toll on the royal treasury. In the final year of Ariovarzanes’s reign, a stowaway was discovered aboard a Pontic merchant ship en route from Chersonesos to Sinope. It came to the captain’s attention that the stowaway was in fact an assassin fleeing from the Tauric city after attempting to murder the local tyrant, Herakles. Upon reaching the port of Sinope, the assassin was arrested by the city guard and taken before Ariovarzanes and his court. There, it was revealed that the assassin was sent by Vasileos Antigonos II to cause chaos in Chersonesos in advance of an Antigonid invasion. Upon this revelation, the court of Ariovarzanes requested that the man be executed for his crime against the Tauric city state. Instead the Vasileos had the assassin spared in exchange for information about the defenses forces protecting Chersonesos. After torturing all the information he could out the prisoner, Ariovarzanes sold the man to Rhodian slavers.
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    Ariovarzanes’s last orders were to begin the construction of grand fleet at the port of Sinope. He had plans of taking his army across the Euxienos Sea and invade Taurike for Pontos using his newfound knowledge of the city’s defenses.
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    By the end of Ariovarzanes’s reign, Antigonos II had subdued Antipatros of Makedonia and Alexandros II of Epirus and annexed their kingdoms into his growing empire.
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    Ariovarzanes would not live to see his fleet assembled. He would succumb to injuries received from being thrown from his steed riding in the Paphlagonian countryside at 43 years of age. His only son, Mithridates II succeeded him in the month of Thargelion in the 2nd year of the 132nd Olympiad.
     
  6. Arquebuse

    Arquebuse Chieftain

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    Always good to know people are reading! :)
     
  7. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Zuniga

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    Subbed for sure!
     
  8. DKVM

    DKVM Basileus of the Romaioi

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  9. Arquebuse

    Arquebuse Chieftain

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    Mithridates II: The Tauric War


    Seeing the rise of the Antigonid Kingdom, Mithridates sent emissaries to Seleukos II of the Seleucid Kingdom to the east. He hoped to establish good relations with the Diadochus to have an ally in case of war.
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    Ten years after the death of Ariovarzanes, the final ship of the grand fleet was pushed off the shores of Paphlagonia into the sea. The fleet then sailed east to Trapezous, where the army awaited to be ferried across the Euxienos. Mithridates would accompany the fleet on its inaugural journey.
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    With the budding relationship between Pontos and the Seleucids, Mithridates ordered the construction of a road between Pontic Galatia and Seleucid Syria. The Vasileos hoped that the route would facilitate much trade between the two kingdoms.
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    Kolchian tribes in the far eastern regions of Pontos revolted against the Hellenes migrating into their lands. After pillaging Hellene settlements in the countryside, the Kolchians, united under Vasileos Kugi, descended upon the city of Trapezous. When the battle began, the Uazali quickly surrounded Kugi and his guard. When the Vasileos was struck down, the Kolchians routed and a massacre ensued. Those spared were taken as slaves and sold to fishermen along the Pontic and Paphlagonian coasts.
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    After the Kolchians were pacified, the Uazali in Trapezous loaded onto the boats of the grand fleet. The ships then set sail across the Euxienos for Taurike.
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    Fresco of the Pontic Fleet Leaving the Port of Trapezous


    Mithridates and the Uazali landed and established a foothold the hills just northeast of the main Tauric port of Chersonesos. Scouting revealed the city to be lighted defended by a militia of around five thousand. Mithridates offered to spare the soldiers and people of Chersonesos if they stood down. The tyrant, Herakles, emerged from the city to negotiate, but after a few days of deliberation Mithridates sensed the man was merely stalling for time. Scouts reported a large militia was being gathered in the countryside to aid in the defense of Chersonesos. Hearing this, Mithridates ordered the attack on the city. The local militia was weak and scattered quickly before the Uazali. Unfortunately, Herakles escaped to the countryside and united with the rural militia.
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    Herakles decided to cut his losses and take his Tauric militia and head to the port city of Tanais on Maeotis Lake, hoping to establish himself there. Mithridates promptly split his forces. Half pursued the tyrant and his militia to the north while the rest remained in Chersonesos to maintain order in the city.
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    Mithridates pursued Herakles out of Taurike into the Ypervore. Eventually, Herakles and his men ran into a contingent of heavily armored soldiers. Rather than fighting Mithridates, Herakles attacked the strangers, but was miserably defeated and taken captive. At first Mithridates believed the strangers were the race of giants believed to inhabit the Ypervore. But upon approaching them, he realized they were normal men. Their leader, Marcus Valerius Messalla, claimed they hailed from a city called Roma in lands north of Megale Hellas. The Romans turned over the defeated Herakles to Mithridates and the tyrant would be executed in the agora of Chersonesos three weeks later.
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    Upon returning to his court in Sinope, Mithridates was greeted by a merchant from a far off land along the Thalatta Sea called Sava. The merchant bore gifts of gold and incense from his homeland. Enamored by the exotic gifts, Mithridates told the man to send word to his Vasileos that the Kingdom of Pontos was willing to trade with Sava.
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    Hoping to establish a trade route between Pontos and Sava, Mithridates contacted the Ptolemies in Aegyptos and negotiated with Ptolemaios III to secure Pontic merchant rights at the ports of Pelousion and Arsinoe.
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    Mithridates II is presumed to have perished when his ship was caught in harsh storm on return trip from trade negotiations on Rodos. To this day, some say he washed up on the island of Chios where he spent the rest of his life as a hermit. He was 39 years old. His son, Mithridates III, would be coronated in the month of Elaphevolion in the 1st year of the 140th Olympiad.
     
  10. DKVM

    DKVM Basileus of the Romaioi

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    None of your pictures in your latest post are loading for me
     
  11. Arquebuse

    Arquebuse Chieftain

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    Any idea what the problem might be or how to fix it? They were uploaded and linked the same way as the others.
     
  12. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Zuniga

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    They work for me!
     
  13. Arquebuse

    Arquebuse Chieftain

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    Mithridates III: The Last War of the Diadochi


    A man named Sima Tan from Seres in the far east had completed his journeys throughout the known world. He culminated his life’s work the history, the Shiji. It contains much of the history and culture of all the peoples from Seres to Iveria. Sima Tan lauded the knowledge of Roma and the Diodochian kingdoms in his masterpiece. Sadly, Pontos was but a footnote in the history.
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    Scythian nomads began to harass the inhabitants of Taurike. Luckily, Chersonesos was well defended and the city was spared destruction.
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    The road from Galatia to Syria started by Mithridates’s father had finally been completed. It ran all the way from Sinope to the village of Melitia on the Euphrates in the north of Syria. The route would serve as a connection to the east for generations.
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    The Romans began their invasion of Syria by capturing the port city of Tyros and then pushing inland to take Damaskos. After their initial successes, the Romans were pinned down in southern Syria when Seleucid forces arrived from the east and counterattacked. The general of the Roman forces, Publius Cornelius Scipio, sent a messenger to Mithridates asking him to aid his forces by invading Syria from the north. Mithridates respectfully declined as Pontos was in no shape to fight a war with the Seleucids.
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    Instead Philippos V of the Antigonid Kingdom offered aid to Romans and invaded Syria through Cilicia. No longer being able to trade with the Seleucids, Philippos offered to open trade relations with Pontos; Mithridates gladly accepted.
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    Mithridates, ever the opportunist, realized that only one Diadochus would be able to survive this war. He thus sent a man by the name of Pairisades, a friend and Tauric merchant, to explore the lands of Philippos V and Antiochos III and look for weaknesses in their kingdoms, both military and political.
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    Pairisades first travelled west. He reported that Philippos maintained a strong grip on his kingdom even after moving his palace to Makedonia. But his expansion west, combined with the war with Antiochos spread his army thin, leaving regions such as Thrake, Ionia and Phrugia lightly garrisoned.
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    With Taurike pacified, Mithridates sent his general, Apollonios, south to Aegyptos in exchange for the Ptolemaic siege engineer, Diognetes. The Vasileos, Ptolemaios IV, also sent a large sum of gold with Diognetes as a gift to Pontos. Mithridates’s sister, Laodike, would later marry Ptolemaios as his second wife.
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    Gallian tribes that had settled down in Armenia and Kappadokia began harassing merchants and travelers along the road to Syria. Mithridates sent a garrison from Pontos to Kappadokia to deal with the bandits. After defeating much of the Gallian forces, the remnants of the tribes fled to Syria.
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    Pairisades visited Cilicia, which had recently been captured from the Antigonid Kingdom by Antiochos. The garrison at the city of Tarsos was small, but the locals spoke of a larger force coming from the east.
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    Pairisades then travelled to Roman Syria just in time to witness the Seleucid siege of Tyros. The Seleucids fought well, but their Roman counterparts proved steadfast and lifted the siege. Antiochos and his men were forced to retreat to Antiocheia in the north.
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    Mosaic of Antiochos III Speaking to his Men Before the Siege of Tyros


    With the loss at Tyros, Antiochos was desperate for help. He sent his son Seleukos to Sinope to beg for help in their war. Again, Mithridates could only decline.
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    Pairisades had grown weary after his 14 years of travel. He settled down in the Antigonid city of Ankyra in Phrugia. He continued to send reports to Mithridates of the political climate of the Antigonid Kingdom.
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    Scythians invaded Taurike again, this time destroying the town of Kerkinitis in the process. Mithridates ordered the construction of a fort near the isthmus between Taurike and the Ypervore to halt the Scythians before they could enter Taurike.
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    Insofar, the only Gallians known to Pontos were the hostile tribes inhabiting Galatia, Kappadokia and Armenia. When traders from Gallia arrived at Pontic ports, many were surprised to find these people were somewhat civilized. Trade would soon flourish with the distant Gallians.
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    Publius Cornelius Scipio again sent a message to Pontos asking for aid in the war against Antiochos. He could no longer make progress on his own as his countrymen in Roma refused to send him any more legions. Yet again, Mithridates refused to enter on either side of the war.
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    A large fortress was built near the town of Kalos Limin in the north of Taurike. Ten thousand men were stationed in the area to protect Taurike from the barbarous nomads of Ypervore.
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    While inspecting the defenses in Taurike, Mithridates fell and badly cut his leg. Mithridates III died due to an infection in the wound in Sinope at age 53. He was succeeded by his son Pharnakes I, who was coronated in the month of Ekatomvaion in the 4th year of the 148th Olympiad.
     
  14. Lokki242

    Lokki242 El Zuniga

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    I have a feeling Pontus is about to grow a lot...
     
  15. Arquebuse

    Arquebuse Chieftain

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    Pharnakes I: The Varvaros Wars


    After the death of Mithridates III, a massive horde of over twenty thousand Scythians approached Taurike. Hearing the news, Pharnakes sailed to Chersonesos and gathered a militia to aid in the defense of the Tauric border.
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    The nomads hit hard and fast, concentrating their attack at the fortress of Kalos Limin. The Uazali were disorganized by the initial Scythian charge. But Pharnakes rallied his men and surrounded the cavalry. With spears on all sides, the Scythian Vasileos ordered his men to surrender. The Pontic losses were still heavy, numbering over five thousand.
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    A messenger met Pharnakes at the gates of Chersonesos with news from Pontos. A Kolchian Vasileos by the name of Saulakes gathered his tribesmen in eastern Pontos and staged another Kolchian revolt. Pharnakes arrived in Trapezous just in time to lead the city garrison against the rebels. Fighting with even numbers, the well trained Uazali routed the tribesmen with minimal losses. Saulakes fled mid-battle and eventually found refuge to the east in the Kingdom of Iveria.
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    Ornamental Shield Depicting an Uazali Fighting a Kolchian


    Pharnakes returned to Taurike to celebrate his victories over the Scythians and Kolchians. In memory, he ordered the construction of temples to the god Mithras in all the towns of Taurike. Scythian and Kolchian slaves acquired from the battles were vital in the construction of the grand temples.
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    After the celebrations were complete, Pharnakes went in search of the Kolchian rebel leader, Saulakes. He demanded that the Vasileos if Iveria, Sauromakes, turn over the man at once. The Vasileos denied that Saulakes ever entered his realm. Pharnakes then went to the neighboring Armenian Kingdom. The Armenian Vasileos, Artaxias, told that Saulakes had crossed into Armenian territory with a small warband of Kolchians and Iverians, and had been captured by Armenian forces. Saulakes was later executed in the Armenian capital of Artaxata, with Pharnakes as witness.
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    On his journey back to Sinope from Armenia, Pharnakes made the poor decision of fording a creek on a cold winter afternoon. The Vasileos fell off his horse and into the freezing water. He would die of hypothermia that night at age 33. With his son, Mithridates V, too young to take the throne, Pharnakes’s brother Mithridates IV was coronated in the month of Anthesterion on the 2nd year of the 152nd Olympiad.
     
  16. Arquebuse

    Arquebuse Chieftain

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    Mithridates IV: The Birth of an Empire Pt. I


    Sima Tan’s son, Sima Qian, followed in his father’s footsteps and took a grand tour of the world for himself. He would summarize the people and places he saw in the Taishigong Shu. He noted that not much had changed in the last 70 years, other than the rise of Roma at the expense of the kingdoms of the Diadochi.
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    Pairisades had remained a loyal friend to Pontos through the reign of Pharnakes I and into Mithridates’s reign. But the man grew less cautious with his age. He was caught by a slave servant who saw him writing a letter to Mithridates about the whereabouts of the Antigonid army in Phrugia. The slave turned the information over to the nobility of Ankyra in exchange for his freedom. The 87 year old Pairisades was executed the next day without a trial.
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    Hearing news of the death of his good friend and close ally, Mithridates promised that Pairisades’s loyalty would not be wasted. Using the reports collected over the decades, Mithridates ordered the invasion of Antigonid Phrugia. Thus began the Anatole War.
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    Seleucid forces crushed the Antigonid defenses in Lukaonia and marched into Phrugia. They then mounted an assault of the city of Ankrya and although they were repelled, the city’s defenses were made ripe for the approaching Pontic army.
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    Mithridates’s army marched into the city with almost no resistance. Ankyra had mostly been abandoned after the near defeat of the city garrison to the Seleucids. Although the city’s population fell to nearly one thousand residents, refugees from the Phrugian countryside were already pouring in.
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    The army then moved into Vithynia to plunder the countryside. The great estates of the nobility were set ablaze and their slaves taken for Pontos. The nobility themselves were either killed or enslaved.
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    Seeing that Pontos was now on their side of the war, the Seleucid Vasileos Antiochos IV came to Mithridates asking to open trade between the two kingdoms. Mithridates gladly accepted the deal from his new ally.
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    A reconnaissance force sent to Ionia happened upon a group of Antigonid siege engineers in the hills of Karia. The engineers, with no other option, agreed to join Mithridates’s army and were sent to Ankyra.
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    Scouts spotted the main Antigonid army in the foothills of Pisidia led by the Vasileos Perseus. Siege engineers were spotted among the soldiers as well. Fearing a counterattack in Phrugia, Mithridates ordered all Pontic forces to retreat to Ankyra to regroup and face the Antigonids.
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    Antigonid forces marched towards Ankyra, destroying the salt mines of Lake Alas in the process, but the captured Antigonid siege engineers set a trap for the invaders. The engineers set up Oxybeles on a ridge overlooking the Antigonid camp near the lake. When night fell, hundreds of flaming bolts rained down on the camp, killing many and destroying much of the army’s supplies. After the attack, Perseus took his forces north and began to prepare to siege Ankyra.
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    As the Antigonid army marched north, Mithridates ordered a daring assault to disrupt Perseus’s plans to lay siege to Ankyra. Gallian mercenaries were hired to conduct a night raid on the army camp and either kill or capture the Antigonid siege engineers. Unfortunately, Perseus was able to rally his men and defeat the Gallians while only losing a few of his engineers. The army packed up the next morning and continued the march north.
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    The two armies were evenly matched until Pontic reinforcements arrived from Paphlagonia, doubling Mithridates’s numbers. Unaware of the arrival of fresh soldiers, Perseus attacked the city he had lost only six years ago. Perseus’s army of ten thousand was met with twenty thousand Uazali. His engineers also proved useless as Uazali flanked around the Antigonid ranks and destroyed the siege equipment. When Perseus realized the battle was lost, he drank a vial of poison and surrendered his men to the will of Mithridates. With the Vasileos dead and his son a mere child, the Antigonid Kingdom began to show signs of fracture.
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    The widow of Perseus, now regent, Laodike V tried to hold the kingdom together, but was unable to rally the army. With nobody standing in his way, Mithridates marched into the highlands of Karia, toward the grand Antigonid port of Ephesos.
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    As Mithridates and his army drew close to Ephesos, scouts began reporting back that the city was well garrisoned and the thick walls of the city would require a long siege.
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    Declaring himself Vasileos of the Antigonids, Perseus’s half-brother Philippos raised an army in Vithynia. He first tried to retake the old Antigonid capital of Ankyra, but the city’s Pontic garrison proved resilient. Philippos retreated from Pontic lands and began raiding villages in Antigonid Mysia. Laodike’s forces would eventually catch up to Philippos and defeat him and his army.
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    With Mithridates and the army in far off Ionia, Armenian immigrants in Taurike took the opportunity to revolt against Pontic rule. Although local forces eventually quelled the revolt, the Tauric countryside was ravaged by the fighting and the walls of Chersonesos were destroyed in a nearly successful assault by Armenian rebels. When those responsible for the revolt were captured, one of the main conspirators turned out to be a member of the Armenian court. He had been sent by Vasileos Artavasdes to lead an Armenian insurrection in hopes of securing Taurike for himself. Mithridates felt betrayed by his eastern friend and ordered that trade with the Armenian Kingdom cease at once. He was too busy fighting the Antigonids to get revenge on Artavasdes, but promised that their time would come.
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    After months of sieging the city, a hole had finally opened in the walls of Ephesos. Uazali poured into the gap, but were met with stiff resistance from the city’s garrison. After hours of fighting, the garrison surrendered and Mithridates paraded proudly through Ephesos.
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    Relief Sculpture of the Battle of Ephesos


    After the capture of Ephesos, Mithridates sent his men to the Ionian countryside to pacify the region. The soldiers also seized many slaves from the landed Antigonid nobles of the region.
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    By the time Mithridates’s death, he had nearly doubled the size of the Pontic Kingdom. He had annexed Phrugia, Vithynia, Caria, Ionia, Aiolis, Lydia and Doris. Most importantly, he had secured a port on the Aigaion Sea so that the kingdom was no longer dependent on the Antigonid-controlled Bosporos for access to the Mesogeios.
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    After Ephesos was pacified, Mithridates accompanied a small invasion force to the island of Samos. The people of the island accepted Pontic rule and let the army enter without a fight. As Mithridates toured the town of Vathy on the island, a man in the crowd fired an arrow, striking the Vasileos in the head. Mithridates IV died immediately, he was 51 years old. The assassin was never found and the entire town was burned as punishment. Mithridates was unable to produce a viable heir from his marriage to his sister Laodike. The crown of Pontos therefore went to his nephew Mithridates V, son of Pharnakes I. Mithridates V was coronated in the month of Skirophorion in the 2nd year of the 157th Olympiad.
     
  17. Arquebuse

    Arquebuse Chieftain

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    Mithridates V: The Birth of an Empire Pt. II


    The Cult of Mithras continued to grow in the Kingdom of Pontos. Mithridates ordered the construction of a grand Mithraic temple in Ephesos in honor of both his father and his uncle.

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    Mithridates did not hesitate to continue the war against the Antigonids. The Vasilissa Laodike V had since passed and her son, Alexandros, took the Antigonid throne. Although lacking a strong grip on his crumbling kingdom, Alexandros was determined to resist Pontic domination. Mithridates IV had divided the Antigonid Kingdom and left Pisidia, Lykia and Pamphylia isolated from Alexandros in Makedonia. Mithridates moved to reconcile this and took his army into the Pisidian highlands. He continued into Pamphylia toward the city of Perge, where a sizable garrison awaited.

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    As the Pontic army neared Perge, scouts discovered Antigonid engineers setting up siege engines in the hills to the northeast of the city. The Uazali pounced on the engineers and captured the engines before the garrison of Perge could react.

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    While the captured siege engines rained boulders and bolts down onto Perge, engineers built more in the main Pontic camp. Fearing that the city would be decimated by a massive siege. The garrison of Perge creeped out of the city at night and simultaneously assaulted the two siege positions. The Uazali were quick to react, but not quick enough. All the Pontic siege engines were destroyed and many engineers were killed. But the Pergians were now caught outside of their fortifications. The Uazali surrounded them and fought until the last of the garrison were killed. In the morning, Mithridates moved the army into the city to finish off what militia remained, but the city offered their surrender before any more blood was shed.

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    Mithridates did not wait for the next summer to begin his next campaign; he marched his army to Vithynia during the fall and crossed the Bosporos by winter. After crossing the channel, Mithridates began to lay siege to Byzantion.

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    The Roman governor and general in Syria, Quintus Caecilius Metellus, grew angry with Mithridates due to the invasion of their Antigonid ally. Regardless, he sent a message to Mithridates asking for aid in the war against the Seleucids. Mithridates could not comply as the Seleucid Vasileos, Demetrios II, was his ally in the war against Alexandros.

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    Byzantion is the crossroads between west and east, and if Alexandros lost the city there would be nothing to stop the Pontic army from pouring into the remainder of his kingdom. He sent his royal guard to aid the militia of Byzation in their defense. Antigonid moral was high, the royal guard proved formidable and the siege did not damper the spirits of the militia. The Antigonids fought to the last man and although outnumbered two to one, they nearly won the battle. Eight thousand Uazali lay dead on in the streets of Byzantion by the end. It would take Mithridates five years to rebuild his army to finish off the Antigonid Kingdom.

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    The war between the Romans and the Seleucids was ravaging Syria and many refugees were forced to leave the area. The city of Perge became a popular destination among Hellenes, Ioudaians and Persians fleeing the war.

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    Sarmatian nomads from the Iazyges tribes attempted an invasion of Taurike, but the men at the fortress of Kalos Limin were able to repel every attack.

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    With the acquisition of more territory, the Kingdom of Pontos gained many more port cities. The Aigaion proved to be teeming with pirates and the Pontic sea lanes were not safe. In response, the Pontic navy began to develop improved ramming techniques and started enlisting Uazali as marines for boarding enemy ships.

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    Alexandros’s kingdom was falling apart. Mithridates and his army took Thrake and nobles in Makedonia had risen up, questioning his rule. The Antigonid Kingdom did not have much time, but Alexandros would not give up so easily.

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    Relief of Vasileos Alexandros and his Advisors (Those who betrayed him have had their heads removed)



    As if the Romans and Antigonids were not enough for the Seleucids to fight, the Persians in Parthia organized under the Arsacid dynasty and began taking Antiochos VII’s eastern territories. The Parthian Vasileos, Mithridates I, was displeased to hear that his Persikan brothers in Pontos were allies of Antiochos.

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    Last edited: Aug 20, 2017 at 11:04 PM
  18. Arquebuse

    Arquebuse Chieftain

    Joined:
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    Mithridates V: The New Alexandros


    As Mithridates neared the Antigonid capital of Pella, the rebelling Makedonian nobles came to his camp and offered him a deal. The nobles offered their loyalty to Mithridates if he would let them take rule the city as a republic. Mithridates agreed as he was growing wearing of the war. The next summer, the Makedonian rebels entered the city of Pella. The city garrison and royal guard turned against their Vasileos and executed him at the city’s acropolis. A new oligarchical republic was established in its place and its senators all were forced to swear loyalty to Pontos.
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    With the war against the Antigonids in the west complete, the Seleucid Vasileos, Antiochos VII, came to Mithridates asking for help in the east against the Romans. But Mithridates had other plans. He knew the Seleucids were weak and ripe for conquering. They were fighting two superior armies, the Parthians in Mesopotamia, and the Romans in Syria. With the loss of Seleukeia, Antiochos was forced to moved his capital to Antiocheia. Although this move solidified Seleucid power in the western regions, it was only temporary, the kingdom was beginning to collapse.
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    During an extremely bitter winter, Scythian tribesmen were forced south where they eventually reached Taurike. They tried to break through at Kalos Limin, but the Pontic garrison had grown used to the terrain and the Sarmatian cavalry tactics. The tribesmen were once again sent back into the Ypervore.
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    By the next winter, Mithridates had assembled his army along the Seleucid border in Lukaonia. They would wait for siege equipment to arrive in the spring and then cross.
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    Many of the Iazyges tribes had migrated south into Moisia due to the cold winters in the north. Consequently, Thrake became vulnerable to raiding tribesmen. Luckily, the Pontic forces in the region would have no problem fighting the unorganized raiders.
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    The Parthian army continued to push west, eventually capturing the Seleucid city of Edessa in Syria. The young Seleucid Vasileos, Demetrios III, was backed into a corner; and Pontos was ready to make the best of it.
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    Mithridates crossed the border into Seleucid lands, headed for Cilicia. But before the army could even reach the city of Tarsos, Demetrios surrendered to the Parthian Vasileos, Phraates II. He was allowed to hold on to his kingdom, but was forced to swear loyalty to the Parthians. As a sign of good will, Phraates also returned the city of Edessa and negotiated a cease fire with the Romans. Phraates then came to Mithridates and recommended that the Pontic army leave Seleucid lands. Not wanting a war with the Parthians, Mithridates conceded.
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    The winters in the Ypervore only grew colder and more nomads were forced south. Scythians would raid as far south as Byzantion, but the Pontics in Thrake never feared that the city would fall.
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    A Makedonian noble by the name of Andriskos convinced the oligarchs of Pella to resist Pontic domination and end tribute payments. This broke the agreement made between the Makedonians and Mithridates ten years ago. The only way to respond to such dissent was with force.
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    The Makedonians fought hard to defend their meager republic, but their cause was hopeless. The Pellan militia were outnumbered three to one and were crushed by the Uazali. After the battle, Mithridates entered the old palace of the great Alexandros. It had since been converted into the senate building for the young republic. The senators all stood huddled in the corner, fearing Mithridates and his cadre of soldiers. Then a younger senator, Andriskos, stepped forward seemingly unafraid of his angry master. Mithridates, without a word, struck down Andriskos where he stood. He then left the palace to let his men deal with rest of the traitors.
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    Relief on Mithridates V’s Tomb of the Battle of Pella


    The size of the Kingdom of Pontos had nearly tripled in size since the time of Mithridates’s father. The Antigonids were defeated, the Seleucids were crippled and the Romans were having trouble supporting their provincee of Syria. Pontos and the Ptolemies remained the only true powers in the Eastern Mesogeios.
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    While celebrating the birth of his second son at a grand banquet, Mithridates fell ill and retreated to his quarters. When his servants checked on him, they found him dead by poisoning; he was 54 years old. The assassins were never found but Mithridates’s eldest son and heir, Mithridates VI, feared it was his mother. Mithridates VI was coronated the next day in the month of Elaphevolion in the 4th year of the 164th Olympiad.
     

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