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Preview: OWNES I: The National Game

Discussion in 'Never Ending Stories' started by Owen Glyndwr, Aug 7, 2013.

  1. Owen Glyndwr

    Owen Glyndwr La Femme Moderne

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    Introduction
    1903, New York City. At long last the owners of the Federal Association and the National Association have come to terms, and there is peace in the baseball world once more. The crisis began 3 years ago, when the Federal Association, the longest running professional base ball league in these United States decided that talent shortages and lack of competitive balance deemed it necessary for the league to cut their number of teams from 12 down to 8. This gave a crucial opening for the National Association, an upstart league founded in 1892 and based largely in the midwest, to catapult themselves into national prominence. 3 of those 4 teams cut from the Federal Association jumped over to the National Association. Bolstered by its newfound strong presence in the major cities of the Atlantic seaboard, the National Association was able to compete directly with the Federal Association, and thanks to its cheaper ticket prices, comparable talent, and cleaner overall image (the National Association notably did not sell or allow alcohol into their games), it was the National Association which appeared to be coming out on top.

    This was a glorious time for the players. The rise of the prominence of the National Association undermined the Federal Association's infamous reserve clause, a clause written into every player's contract preventing him from playing for any other team for life. Player contracts soared from an average of $1200 per year to over $4000 as players freely jumped from team to team. It was a return to the chaos of the early days of baseball before the introduction of the owners. Things came to a head in 1902 as one player, Wellington Hough, simultaneously agreed to two separate contracts with two different teams, one in the Federal, and one in the National Association. When a judge ruled in favor of the player (and thereby benefiting the National Association at the expense of the Federal), it was the final nail in the coffin for the oldest baseball association in America: the Federal Association waved the white flag.

    The owners of both leagues convened in New York to finally and officially settle the dispute. The National and Federal Associations would coexist as the only two major leagues in North America. The several other upstart leagues which had enjoyed the benefits of such a chaotic environment, such as the Atlantic League, Lakes League, and Appalachian League, would be squashed. The reserve clause would be recognized and enforced by both major leagues and all minor leagues - no longer would players be free to jump from team to team as they so pleased, and consequently costs would be better controlled for the players. A standard set of rule changes - most notably a rule enforcing called-strikes on foul balls - would be agreed upon. Finally as a symbol of the newfound accord between the Federal and National Associations, the top teams from each league would get together and play in a World Series to decide the best base ball team in the world - the first time the World Series was to be played since the now-defunct National League played against the Federal Association in 1888. This new accord between the two Major Leagues of Base Ball is full of bright opportunities. A world of cheating, cut-throat business deals, and winning at any cost. The possibilities are endless, it takes but one enterprising owner to reach out and snatch them.

    What This NES is About
    This is a NES set in America, predominantly in the United States in the year 1903. Players in the NES (to avoid confusion I will refer to you the participants as players and the fictional baseball players as ballplayers) will take the role of part-owner and part-manager as they will create teams, sign and trade players, negotiate contracts and compete to be the best team in base ball. This is more than simply a game about baseball though. You don't necessarily have to know anything about the sport, and it may just be more entertaining if you don't. This isn't the baseball of today - with the heavily staffed offices of scouts, GMs, assistants to the GMs, and highly trained statistical analysts. The world of base ball from 1903-1920 was replete with eccentric owners who saw their teams as trifles - side projects for their amusement while they focused on more important tasks. Harry Frazee, an owner of the Boston Red Sox was notorious for selling ballplayers - notably Babe Ruth - to the Yankees to help him finance his first love - broadway shows. At the same time baseball was equally replete with austere former ballplayers and baseball men who had ruthlessly crawled to the top of the baseball world and saw ownership as their primary source of income. Owners such as Connie Mack of the Athletics and Charles Comiskey of the White Sox were notorious for their stinginess, acquiring players and then selling them for all they were worth their next year, gutting entire teams for all they were worth the instant they ceased to provide value. This wasn't to say Comiskey and Mack didn't value putting a good product on the field - Comiskey spent a small fortune (from his own personal savings, no less) to try to bring a World Series title back to Chicago at long last. At the end of the day, baseball at this time was no different to the myriad other trusts and industries running rampant at this time. Labor disputes, collusion, unethical practices, and a blatant disregard for employee health was a fact of the time, and one you the player is going to have to navigate.

    How This All Works
    You the Player will create a team. I will then provide you with a roster to start with. The game will progress by turns, and each turn will span 1 month of the game year, with offseason turns spanning 2 months instead of 1. During each turn you will submit orders. The orders can be as detailed or vague as you like. You are free to hire a manager to defer all in-game decisions, but you are just as free to give me game-by-game lineups with baserunning tendencies and substitution preferences. In addition to lineup cards you will also inform me via orders of any actions the owner takes to mitigate ballplayer disputes, owner-owner feuds, and any side-projects you may wish to carry on. I will then simulate the games using a program I've designed, and update you on the results of those games, in addition to any major news events going on in the world of baseball.

    Scoring in this game will be based on prestige points. It's important to remember that this is not a game about baseball, but about baseball's owners. Although baseball is a major focus of this NES, and putting a successful product on the field will be the fastest and most effective way to earn prestige, points will also be awarded to players who roleplay well at the expense of their team's well-being, players who are stingy, and players who are the savviest businessmen. There are many ways to skin a cat in this NES.

    What I Need From You Right Now

    If you are interested in participating in this game, you are free to join, however you must apply. For now there will be a total of 16 spots available - 8 teams in each league. In the future I may open it up and allow for 2 players to participate as Presidents of the leagues, as well as owners of potential future upstart leagues. It really depends on how many people I get showing interest in the game.

    To apply I will need 4 things from you. I will need: the league you wish to play in, the city you wish for your team to be based out of, a backstory/history of your team ([Federal Association was formed in 1871, with the earliest earliest teams developing 1868-1870; majority of the teams forming throughout the 1870s and early 1880s.] [National Association was formed in 1894, sprouting from the Midwestern League which was founded in 1885. The earliest teams will come from the mid-1880s, with the majority of teams developing in the mid-1890s]). The backstory section is also where you should include any nickname(s) the team may have, as well as uniform designs. If you want to outline what type of team it is (good pitching, bad hitting, for example), you are free to do so and I will take that into account when I form the teams. Finally, I will need your owner's name, and his biography.

    Rules for applications:
    No racist nicknames.
    Travel concerns and demographics made it such that at this stage cities in the Midwest and the Atlantic Seaboard were really the only viable options to host ballclubs. As such, any city you choose can be no further south than Virginia, and no further west than Kansas City. The city you pick can be no smaller than 80,000 inhabitants. You can use this page as a reference:

    http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0027/tab13.txt

    You can also start in Toronto or Montreal if you wish to be a bit more...Canadian.
    http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/archive/index.php/t-123807.html

    Keep in mind that you will be responsible for scheduling and that population sizes will affect your attendance (your primary source of revenue). Each team is required to play every other team in its league 22 times before September 30th. You will be penalized for every game you do not play in the form of a fine, excepting games called due to weather. Also keep in mind that your sole form of travel is rail, and passenger trains averaged just 20 mph during this time, so distances are a very real factor that you're going to have to think about. Finally keep in mind that many cities at this time carried blue laws which explicitly banned the playing of baseball within city limits on Sundays. This will be in play, so you may want to be aware of whether or not your city had blue laws.

    Thanks for reading this, I hope you decide to join in this little NES of mine. I think it's going to be a lot of fun!

    The real thread will start just as soon as I can form the teams.

    Oh and ONE MORE THING!
    While it isn't required for you to be schooled in or even particularly knowledgeable about baseball to play this game, it will definitely help you be successful. I would recommend at least familiarizing yourself with how baseball looked in this era. These are some book recommendations for anybody looking to learn about the period or gain some extra knowledge to help them:

    1. The Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract - This is a fantastic starting point for anybody interested in learning about baseball's history. Bill James is, in my mind, the greatest baseball writer ever. He's fantastically fun to read, with a great deal of knowledge, and he does a good job of bringing each decade of baseball to life.
    2. Crazy '08 - A history of the 1908 baseball season. The primary inspiration for this NES (alongside the Historical Baseball Abstract). It provides excellent information on how baseball looked in this era from both a player and ownership perspective. Good information about how contract negotiation tended to work.
    3. Eight Men Out - A history of the Black Sox Scandal of 1919. It's a little late for the start date, but the deadball era was the deadball era. Again it provides good information on how deadball baseball worked.
    4. Baseball In The Garden of Eden - A history on the formative years of baseball. I'm not a big fan of John Thorn but his research is sound. This one may help in developing team histories.
    5. Ken Burns: Baseball - Probably my all-time favorite documentary series. Ken Burns does a really good job of bringing baseball to life in this series, although a lot of the information is very pie-in-the-sky and New York-centric. A good starting point if you don't know anything about the history of baseball.

    In addition to books on the history of the game, it may behoove you to inform yourself about baseball statistics and analytics. Although sabermetrics are not required to succeed at this game, the simulator I created is based on sabermetric principles. Players wishing to get a leg-up on the competition (or who wish to learn more about baseball statistics) should consult these books:

    1. Moneyball - A history of the 2002 Oakland Athletics season. This book does a good job of preventing some of the more basic principles of sabermetrics in a very readable style. This one is a real page-turner.
    2. The Book: Playing Percentages in Baseball - Tom Tango's revolutionary work. This book looks at the statistics between a lot of "baseball strategies" like bunting, stealing, intentional walks, and lineup orders. It's important to take with a grain of salt, because the deadball era was a very different beast than what Tango is talking about. It does lay down the principle behind wOBA, the single most important statistic you can use. An excellent and fundamental read for any sabermetrician.
    3. Baseball Between the Lines: Why Everything You Know About the Game is Wrong - A Baseball Prospectus Book (Nate Silver is a contributor in this book). Like The Book, this one looks at a lot of fundamental "baseball principles" and tries to identify if they hold water. In addition to being a thoroughly interesting read, it introduces some interesting concepts like fielding evaluation and lineup ordering.
    4. Any of Bill James' Baseball Abstracts - Again, Bill James is perhaps the most important baseball writer of all time. Each of these yearly abstracts is chock full of information that may be useful to you.

    In the main thread I will provide a glossary explaining many baseball terms, statistics, and the concepts behind them. If you have any questions about statistics, what they mean, or how to use them, feel free to ask me and I will be more than happy to help you out.
     
  2. Wrymouth3

    Wrymouth3 Emperor

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    How will we do mechanics regarding college players who want to make a jump to the big leagues? There is no draft at this point in history, but I want to know how this would work.
     
  3. Milarqui

    Milarqui Deity

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    Location:
    Granada, Andalucía, España, Europa
    Heh. I once had an idea about making a football NES, but it was a bit too difficult to organize.
     
  4. Owen Glyndwr

    Owen Glyndwr La Femme Moderne

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    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    Talent accumulation in this era basically came down to scouting. Generally talent came from three different areas: minor leagues, college leagues, and walk-ons. Scouting was not particularly refined in its methodology at this time, and often talent was "discovered" because a manager's scout (generally just a friend of the manager who was interested in baseball) would "discover" a guy and write to the manager urging him to hire the guy. It was an imprecise method and a manager would routinely receive hundreds of these "pro tips" a year. So it's going to look a bit like that:

    I will be backending a number of minor and amateur leagues. Each update I will focus on one of them and provide you with the top performers and players of interest. Acquiring minor league players will require negotiating with minor league owners for the rights to that player. It's important to remember that this is an era before the minor leagues were made slave to the majors. The owners of minor leagues are independent and the goal for players was not necessarily to break into the big leagues. It's going to take some serious negotiating to convince minor league owners to part with their moneymaking superstars. In addition each owner will be provided with a choice between one of three scouts that they are allowed to employ. Each turn you can send that scout to a different region (ivy league colleges, minor leagues, other teams even), and he will investigate and report back on any players of interest he has found that he thinks you might be interested in recruiting. Scouts will also factor into the evaluation of walk-ons and tryouts.

    If any of that makes sense, I hope it does.
     
  5. Wrymouth3

    Wrymouth3 Emperor

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    Location:
    Fort Lauderale, Florida
    Just remember whichever team picks up Titus Young or JaMarcus Russell is going to have to constantly change the roster.
     
  6. Milarqui

    Milarqui Deity

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    Granada, Andalucía, España, Europa
    Who're Titus Young and JaMarcus Russell?
     
  7. Wrymouth3

    Wrymouth3 Emperor

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    Location:
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    JaMarcus Russell is a guy who usually never has time to focus on football. You may know him for being nominated for the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2010 for discovering the medicinal benefits of a synthetically created compound containing agents of Codeine and Jolly Rancher soft drink. Titus Young is just a schizophrenic who thinks he is Robin Hood.
     
  8. madviking

    madviking north american scum

    Joined:
    May 22, 2005
    Messages:
    11,337
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    flavortown
    City: Providence (RI)

    League: Federal Association

    Owner: Joseph "Joe" Gould


    Figure 1: A portrait of the owner, Mr. Joseph Gould

    Background: Joe Gould is the son of Cornelius A. Gould III, the third generation owner of Gould Shipping & Industry, a major business in Providence, RI. The company have made the Goulds one of the richest families in New England, with the family owning several mansions both in Rhode Island and elsewhere (most notable in upstate South Carolina). John Joseph Gould (b. 1745) immigrated to the United States just before the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, whom he fought on the side of the colonists. Afterwards, John Gould settled his family just outside Providence. His son, Cornelius A. Gould I started Gould Shipping and Industry in 1808. The company passed onto his son, and then passed onto his grandson, Cornelius A. Gould III. However, times have been tough for Cornelius A. Gould III. The business was declining due to increases in businesses elsewhere, notable the Midwest.

    Cornelius A. Gould III served in the Civil War in the 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, seeing action at Gettysburg. There, Gould befriended Union Major General Abner Doubleday, whom gave him the inspiration to founded a base ball club in his native Rhode Island. After the war, in 1868, Gould founded the Providence Sailors, an obvious nod to Gould's business. However, Gould would use the base ball team to generate revenue for Gould Shipping & Industry. Not surprisingly, Providence often failed to field a very competitive team.

    However, in 1901, Cornelius A. Gould III's health began to deteriorate, and he made the important decision to split his assets among his two sons, Cornelius IV and Joseph, with Cornelius gaining control of Gould Shipping & Industry and Joseph inheriting the base ball club.

    With the team in new, competent hands, Joe Gould, age 33, no longer has the family business to prop the base ball club up, but he does have family money. But Joe Gould is not very eager to spend since he has to ask his brother and also his sister, Margery Thornton-Gould. Despite family intrigues, Joe Gould managed to have a reasonably competitive team in the 1902 season, finishing with an equal number of wins and losses. Joe Gould was able to turn this around by recruiting young pitchers from one of the many Ivy League schools in New England: Brown, Harvard, Yale, and Dartmouth. He figured it was much easier to increase the team's win total by adding a few good pitchers rather than a few good hitters, since a pitcher was one of few while a hitter was one of many.

    Joe Gould also renamed the team. Previously the Providence Sailors and the Providence Colossi, he renamed the team to the Providence Blues and also redesigned the uniforms.


    Figure 2: The home and away uniforms for the Providence Blues in the 1903 season.

    Joe Gould sees many good things in the Blues' future, especially with the quick turnaround he was able to orchestrate in the 1902 season. The citizens of Providence have applauded his efforts, with the Providence Journal noting that "a change of ownership was able to breathe life into this oft-uncompetive base ball club".
     
  9. Nuka-sama

    Nuka-sama See ya! It has been a fun decade!

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    City: New York, New York
    League: Federal
    Owner: Cid Harrison
    Team Name: The New York Americans
    Background:

    Cid Harrison hails from New Orleans Louisiana, the son of the wealthy shipping magnate Rod Harrison. Cid was shipped off to Yale at 18, where he failed almost every class and only graduated from the sheer weight of his father's donations to the school. While he hated classes, the only thing that kept him motivated in school was the baseball that he played with his fellow students. A solid third baseman, he was known for his glove and his bat, and likely would have tried to play for a professional team were it not for an untimely knee injury a week before his try out. His father forced him to come back to New Orleans, where Cid joined the family business for a while, and actually did surprisingly well. Eventually, shipping got boring and Cid started a baseball team in New Orleans. While it did well in local play, his attempts to convince the Federal league in 1890 to come to New Orleans failed due to travel costs. Seeing the potential of both the business and the fun of the league, Cid packed his bags and his best team members and shipped them up to New York City in 1892, changing the team name from the New Orleans Blues to the New York Americans. Initially, the Americans were known for their solid offense, but their terrible pitching and even worse fielding. From 1893 to 1899, the Americans finished in the bottom 3 every year but in 1895. However, Cid Harrison, using some of his little remaining money, decided to up their game with the addition of two key players in Pitcher Mo Franklin and Third Baseman Huey Fremont to add into super star Dewy LeFont at second base. These additions helped, and since 1896, the Americans have finished in the top 3 every year, even going to second in 1902. The key thing for the Americans is that while they still have excellent hitting, their fielding and pitching is both mediocre, and the Americans will need to solve this if they ever wish to capture the Federal League title.

     
  10. Wrymouth3

    Wrymouth3 Emperor

    Joined:
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    1,069
    Location:
    Fort Lauderale, Florida
    City: Richmond, VA

    League: Federal League

    Owner: Hadley Fleischman



    Brief backstory: Hadley Fleischman, son of Moshe Fleischman and Hilda Fleischman both Ashkenazi Jews, was born in 1873 in Budapest, Hungary. Emigrating from Hungary tothe United States was not an easy process for young Hadley, as he constantly faced anti-Semitic resentment and hatred towards his family's accumulated wealth from his father's bank chain which began operation in 1887 in Pittsburgh. After his graduation from high school at the young age of 16, Hadley earned a financial grant and an assortment of scholarships awarded by the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. While at Virginia, Hadley met up with and joined a group of young men into the University of Virginia's chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, one of whom introduced Hadley to the sport of baseball. Every weekend for his four years at the university, Hadley would drop his textbooks on finance and philosophy and go and play baseball with many of his fraternity brothers on a nearby open field. After his graduation, he started a bank chain similar to his father based in the city of Richmond, but with branches in Roanoke, Alexandria and Lynchburg.

    The bank venture was a complete failure, as Hadley tried to emulate exactly what his father did in this so-called "Gilded Age" in the United States. Many of his employees lent out house titles and credit options only for many of the customers of the bank to simply not pay back was was taken out. The bank was completely out of business by 1899. During this period, the Federal League Richmond Rebels were consistently in last place of the league, owners transitioned year after year in hopes of achieving at least some semblance of a semi-successful franchise. In 1902, the previous owner Thomas Gaffney had an open auction in Richmond city square for ownership of this withered and suffering franchise. In the crowd was Hadley Fleischman, who with the $2,100 remaining to his name, bought the Richmond Rebels. In due time, the Richmond Rebels hope that they will one day hopefully reach the top of the Federal League and eventually win the World Series.

    Uniforms: (Apologies, I am the farthest thing from an artist and am not as good as madviking. I will describe the uniforms.)

    Home: White with vertical red stripes and an insignia of a capital blue-colored "R" in cursive.
    Away: Blue with vertical white stripes and an insignia of a capital red-colored "R" in cursive.

    Go Rebels!
     
  11. Azale

    Azale Deity

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    Location:
    Texas
    City: Washington, D.C.
    Team: Washington Smokes
    League: Federal
    Owner: James Buchanan Duke

    Backstory:



    "An All-American team for your All-American Lifestyle!"

    James Buchanan Duke, America's foremost tobacco magnate, is a man who seizes destiny. Fate does not kick him around, The Duke takes Fate by the scruff of the neck and gives it the 'ol 1 2. He is our boss, but he is also our General, commanding us on the battlefield of the free market. Base ball is another battle in this war, gentlemen.

    "Base ball players unanimously agree! British-American Tobacco has that extra kick."

    The nation's capital needs a ball team, and who better than the Smokes? An advertising arm of our expansive British-American Tobacco Company, the Smokes will be the vanguard of a new era of tobacco consumption in America and the world. They will be a symbol of strength, virility, and the American Dream.

    Losers do not do any of these things however. They are symbols of weakness, impotence, and the kid who gets bullied on the playground.

    Americans are not losers. They are winners. We saw the savages, we saw the Mexicans, we saw the Spanish and we conquered. This is what Americans do. If a winning product is not produced on the baseball field, how can we produce a winning product in the factories? Americans won't smoke a loser, no matter how smooth the taste. Winning is a matter of life and death for us.

    Uniforms:



    still need to find a good font!
     
  12. Arrow Gamer

    Arrow Gamer America's Dictator

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Location:
    The Business Plot
    Name: The Chicago Railers
    League: The National Association
    Team History: The Railers formed during the early 1890s, first rising to prominence when they joined the Midwest Association in 1896. During the crisis, the Railers joined the newly formed National Association, like many of its MWA fellows. Their hazardously low ticket prices, which barely broke even with the expenses, saw attendance boom, finally driving the White Sox to an early grave after their owner was hit by a stray bottle and no one was willing to risk the cash. Now, they sit prominent in the Windy City. Based out of Keystone Park, named after the street on which it lay, grew a reputation as the shortest park in baseball, due to the cramped area it was built on.
    Nicknames: The Shorties, the Trains, the Winds, the Bad Guys (a tribute to their now dead enemy's nickname)
    Owner: Brian "The Baron" Cooper
    Owner Bio: A self made man, Brian started in the slums of Chicago, born 1843. Only a young man when the Civil War started, he got a low paying job as a rail worker, building railways for the infrastructure-needing North. Risking it all, he started a small business of his own. Luckily, he managed to get heavy investments from Andrew Carnegie, after promising to provide free railway services for the steel baron's life. His first major railroad was a Chicago-Pittsburgh affair, but he soon expanded it to New York, Phillie and Boston. Soon, he turned to shipping, monopolizing much of the cargo transport between the North and South peninsulas of Michigan on the Great Lakes. Before long, he was one of the transport barons of the Midwest, worth millions and willing to spend. He started the Railers, hoping to cash in on the rise of baseball. But soon, the side venture developed into much more, soon seeing him become emotionally invested in the team. He watched every game in person, read everything the critics said, and most of all, managed the hell out of his franchise.
    Uniforms:
    -Home: Smoke grey, with the orange 'Railers' emblazoned on the front, with a picture of a man driving a rail spike to complete it.
    -Away: White and grey, with an orange railway car on it.
     
  13. Shadowbound

    Shadowbound Scourge of God

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2007
    Messages:
    3,984
    City: New York, New York
    League: National Association
    Team: Mohawks
    Owner: Dan Cody
    Backstory: Uberwealthy prospector and businessman Dan Cody, from his yacht in Lake Michigan, has stepped into the baseball world in a big way with the purchase of the right to locate an NA team in NYC, with an already established Federal team. With the support of Tammany Hall and using seed players from the Baltimore Orioles, such as Roger Bresnahan and Joe McGinnity, he's built a stadium on Broadway between 165th and 168th, and plans to "whip the Federals so hard they go running to San Francisco."
     
  14. Nuka-sama

    Nuka-sama See ya! It has been a fun decade!

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    I am currently rivals with every team in this nes >: (
     
  15. Perfectionist

    Perfectionist Angel of Verdun

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2006
    Messages:
    1,023
    Location:
    FOB Heathrow
    City: Philadelpha, PA
    League: Federal Association
    Owner: Oscar Alexander
    Backstory: Born to a middle-class Baltimore family, Oscar Alexander never showed much interest in sports as a child. Instead he was a mathematical prodigy: to Harvard at 15, PhD by 20, with a thesis focusing on differential geometry. By 23 he was at Gottingen, working under David Hilbert. At this point he seems to have undergone something of a nervous breakdown, over the course of which he abandoned his previous research interests and threw himself into statistics. Upon losing his position and being ostracized by his previous colleagues, Alexander spent his middle twenties as a vagrant worker in central Europe, still working on statistics in his spare time. At the age of 27 he appeared in Monaco with a hundred pounds to his name; a week later he left with nearly a quarter million. Despite intensive investigation Monte Carlo was never able to prove that he'd cheated, and had to settle for banning him from the casino. This incident made Alexander an overnight celebrity in Europe, but also prevented him from repeating the feat. He was under no such cloud of suspicion in America, however, and after returning the homeland won another several hundred thousand dollars before his notoriety caught up with him and ended his gambling days. In search of news to exploit what was either a prodigious statistical talent or a fiendishly clever way of cheating, depending who you asked, Alexander put most of his money in the stock market and used the rest to buy the flailing Philadelphia Phillies baseball club . He promptly renamed the team the Warriors for reasons known only to himself.
    Uniforms: Hell if I know. What the Phils used those days, I guess, cept with a W instead of a P.
     
  16. Owen Glyndwr

    Owen Glyndwr La Femme Moderne

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    Location:
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    Phew, it's a relief to see so many people signing up!

    Just a word of advice to future people interested in joining. I'm not going to tell you where to go, but only 3 of the top 20 cities have been claimed so far. A baseball league without Boston and Chicago and at least either Baltimore, St. Louis, Cleveland or Cincy would be an absolute travesty. Also - no love for the National Association?

    :p
     
  17. Omega124

    Omega124 Challenging Fate

    Joined:
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    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Albany, New York
    City: Albany, New York
    League: National Association
    Owner: Peter Van Kan
    Team Name: The Albany Half-Moons
    Background: The Albany Half-Moons is even older than the Federal Association, founded in 1869 by Albany-native Daniel Smith, a Civil War veteran suffering from what would now be known as PTSD. Baseball was the one joy in his post-war life, and after trying and failing in holding a job, he gambled all his money on building a baseball team. Known back then as the Albany Professionals, they were an independent team that would travel the northeast and play exposition matches with teams. As Daniel considered the team his career, he would spare little expense in getting the best players to give the best show for his team, often even recruiting from the teams he played against.

    In 1871, when the Federal Association was being formed, Smith was interested in joining the league for a more secure market. Renaming the team the Albany Lions, they became one of the founding members of the upstart league. The Lions were noted for their prowess of their in-field game. With perfect throws and perfect catches, and were one of the prime teams, finishing in the top three for the first three years of the league. However, 1874, the stress of flashbacks to the war got to Smith, and he shot himself right before the start of the season. The Van Rensselaers, a prominent political family in Albany, bought the Lions in the ensuing chaos and gutted the team, selling the contracts of all the prominent players before putting the team back on the market. The team would go through a series of managers, and would never be the same again. They became the laughingstock of the league; a guaranteed win for the other teams to beat. A winning season was considered an accomplishment to the Lions. Only the legacy of the Professionals-era and that they barely made money kept them alive in a vague hope that they could one day emulate their successes.

    In 1900, after being terminally-ill financially and the commissioners of the association seeing no help for the Lions, made the decision that one of the four cut teams will be the Albany Lions, to little to no fanfare. The assets were going to be auctioned off, and the destroyed team could finally be put to rest. Enter Peter Van Kan, who recently inherited his father's newspaper industry serving the Upstate New York region. The then 37 year-old had watched the Professional and early Lions era as a kid, and had nostalgia for the times when they were one of the best teams in the nation. Refusing to see them die, Peter offered to buy the whole team, even when it was bleeding red. While it was a very stupid financial move, Peter's newspaper business not only provided a source of income even when the team didn't make any money, but it provided free advertisement for the team in the Upstate Region.

    The National Association in 1900 was aiming to expand out into the more profitable Eastern Seaboard region. The Lions, now for the first time seriously rebuilding and leaugeless, looked like to be the perfect team to recruit. Emulating two other teams that jumped ship, the Albany Lions joined the National Association. Van Kan renamed them into the Albany Half-Moons to symbolize his determination to keep them in Albany and to dissociate the National Association era with their disastrous Federal Association era (Reusing the Professionals name was Van Kan's original desire, but was denied by the National Association due to the fact that all teams were "professionals").

    In 1903 the team is nowhere near the best of the National Association, but is definitely a mid-tier team. They have yet to post a losing record as the Half-Moons, which is considered a huge accomplishment considering their past. Van Kan's obsession of the Professionals days also goes to how they're managed. He built the new team based on the old; focusing on fielding abilities. The shortstop, Len Volkner, is a slugger on bat and can catch seemingly any ball that goes his way. However, the team has a distinct lack of good pitchers, where "mediocre" is considered a compliment. This means the good fielders have to be even better, for otherwise the other team will walk all over them.

    Uniforms:

    Home:White shirt and pants. Orange socks, belt, and hat. On the hat and left chest area, there is a cream semicircle representing a waxing half moon

    Away: Orange shirt and pants. White socks, hat and belt. Hat has a orange Gothic A and in white the word "ALBANY" is written on the shirt


    Spoiler :
    Home city superiority go go go. And yes, the Rensselaers were still somewhat prominent in the late 1800s, although nowhere near their historical level
     
  18. Luckymoose

    Luckymoose The World is Mine

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    Messages:
    18,349
    Location:
    Get Back
    City: Omaha, Nebraska
    Team: Omaha Barons
    League: National
    Owner: Jerry Farfield

    Uniforms:



    Jerry Farfield (born 1849), alternatively known as Lazy Jerry or Fat Jerry, is a former recreational ballplayer from rural South Carolina, who through a combination of inheritance and his own successes as a minor partner in a rail company managed an early retirement. He came to the state a decade earlier in 1892, where he put together a team in the city of Omaha, noting the lack of professional teams in the region. Having invested most of his money into hiring, managing, and booking the Omaha Barons over the past decade, his only aspirations in life revolve around dominating the league and winning the championship.

    Now, Lazy Jerry is a man of conviction. He sees sportsmanship as the highest achievement of his early life and has pushed his players to view their own sportsmanship and athleticism at a higher level than most. His name comes from his appearance, but not the reality. Jerry is a heavy set man, but he is on the field every game barking orders and keeping spirits high. He would rather end up in the poorhouse than allow corruption to seep into his organization.

    Jerry Farfield has a long time rivalry with the owner of the Chicago Foxes, Hosea Whittle.
     
  19. North King

    North King blech

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2004
    Messages:
    18,144
    City: Chicago, Illinois
    League: National Association
    Owner: Hosea Whittle
    Team Name: Chicago Foxes
    Background: "A baseball league without a team in Chicago would be a travesty." Hosea Whittle was probably not a man you'd call "invested" in the sport of baseball. Actually, you probably wouldn't call him "knowledgeable" about the sport of baseball. In truth, Hosea Whittle probably never cared about baseball, and he probably never even heard that famous quote which supposedly set him down the road to buying up the minor league Chicago Foxes and turning them into a profitable outlet. Hosea Whittle was a rich enough man that he probably didn't even notice buying the Foxes in the first place.

    But Hosea Whittle was not the real man behind the curtain anyway.

    Indeed, it was his third child, Wyclef Whittle, who purchased the team in his daddy's name. Wyclef, an incredibly dashing man who had grown up watching the Foxes from their only VIP booth for his entire life, had every trait a good baseball owner could want save one -- actually being a good baseball owner. For alas, Wyclef, also, had very little actual knowledge of the sport, but unlike his father he liked to pretend that he did. After buying the Foxes (and subsequently bringing them into the league) in 1891, he promptly managed them into the ground: over their first eight seasons, they had the worst record in the league 4 times, and only once broke above .500.

    Now this situation simply would not do for the good people of Chicago, and the fans started to desert the team in droves. But then came the greatest PR coup the team could possibly have scored -- hiring a manager. Not because Norman Moyer was a good enough manager to pull the team entirely out of the doldrums -- far from it. No, Moyer was a good manager, but not a great one; the main plus came from the fact that he constantly butted heads with Wyclef, and it was hilarious. Fans soon returned to the stadium just to watch the much anticipated shouting matches between the two, which more than once ended with a concussed employee or a broken bat. In 1900 alone, Wyclef threw his manager out of the stadium no less than 47 times.

    (When asked later in life why he put up with it, Norman noted, "The money was pretty good.")

    What went rather less-well-noticed by those same fans was that some of the moves Norman made were fairly savvy (at least by the standards of the franchise), and the team's fortunes started to [very] slowly rebound. By the time of the agreement in 1903, the Foxes were regularly interspersing their losing seasons with winning ones, though they had yet to actually secure a title. Chicago was far from a successful team as of yet, but history still had plenty of time to go.

    Spoiler unis :
     
  20. Wrymouth3

    Wrymouth3 Emperor

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2011
    Messages:
    1,069
    Location:
    Fort Lauderale, Florida
    Yes, this is the answer I was looking for. Thanks for the help.
     

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