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[RFC-DoC] Hellas Hopeful

Discussion in 'Civ4 - Stories & Tales' started by Caesar Augustus, Dec 1, 2011.

  1. Caesar Augustus

    Caesar Augustus Prince

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    Hellas Hopeful (an RFC DoC story)​

    Hello all. This is my first attempt at a Civ Story, though I am an avid reader of these, especially those related to Rhye’s and Fall. I’ve also taken a great interest in playtesting (ok, mostly just playing) Leoreth’s excellent modmod Dawn of Civilization, which integrates many gameplay elements and a few worthwhile civs into the core RFC experience. I have decided to play my favorite civ from DoC, the Greeks, with an eye not toward their UHV (which if you’re curious has been drastically changed in DoC) but toward long-term power if not hegemony.

    The Greeks are uniquely well-suited to this kind of long-term play, perhaps more than any other civ in DoC. There are others that are close (China and Japan spring to mind) but the combination of a HUGE historical area (the entirety of the Balkans, Egypt, Anatolia, Mesopotamia, and Persia, not to mention Southern Italy and the Crimea) and a ridiculously useful UP (hello there, Great People!) make for a civ that is built to last and prosper. Considering that Leoreth intends to focus on Europe for his next version, I would imagine that some of this strength may be passing. I intend to enjoy it while I can. Of course, it’s not all roses in fair Hellas, as the Romans covet my land dearly and in DoC have a UP that will go a long way toward letting them take it. The Persians could also be a threat, and as the game progresses the Seljuks, Mongols, and Ottomans will make an appearance. And one can never discount the Arabs, Germans, Russians, and the ultimate boogeyman, Stability, from taking their pound of flesh. I’m not entirely certain that the Greeks will overcome all these threats, but we’ll have fun trying.

    And now for all the sordid details. This will be a “gameplay” story, light on RP fluff, and I’ll be playing on Monarch at Normal speed. I’m by no means an expert on this game, nor am I an avid min-maxer, so don’t expect me to dominate nor to always make the best decisions. I’ll be playing on version 202 of the DoC SVN, and considering the rate at which Leoreth is known to update, I doubt that will remain the most recent for too terribly long. I realize that many people haven’t played DoC (if that’s you, do yourself a favor and give it a try), so I’ll try to explain anything DoC specific in more detail, though to be honest it’s been so long since I played any other version of RFC that I may very well miss some. I’ll post screenshots of anything particularly noteworthy, but don’t expect dozens of screenshots per update. I’m not above re-starting if something goes awry in the first few turns, but once I’ve posted the first chapter I’ll have to roll with whatever comes. Thanks for your time and I hope you enjoy.
     
  2. trexeric

    trexeric (or backwards 'cirexert')

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    Can't wait to see this story!
     
  3. Tycho

    Tycho AFK Forum Warrior

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    Should be very interesting right here. Hope you succeed Caesar!
     
  4. Optical

    Optical The Fall of the Eleventh

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    Good luck :)
     
  5. Caesar Augustus

    Caesar Augustus Prince

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    Chapter 1: Hellas Arising​



    I suppose after years of RFC, we’re all pretty familiar with the starting Greek position. I actually had to reload twice because my galley containing the second settler was located in the Gulf of Corinth and I needed it to be in the Ionian. So not exactly the best sign, but I’m generally not one to be bothered by signs. I have decided for this game to settle Korinthos as my capital and Byzantion (1 W of its normal spot) as my second city. I can’t imagine there’s anything unusual about Korinthos as it is a wonderful city spot but I do think I should take a second to explain my rationale on this particular Byzantion placement. First, it still serves as a canal, so no issues there. Second, it has much greater production potential than standard Byzantion. I’ll need that production if I’m going to get any great number of wonders built there. Finally, this placement still has tons of food, having access to 2 Sheep, 1 Fish, 1 Clam, and eventually a Corn. I would rather use the Fish I’m missing out on to support a city in Anatolia itself. In any case, Byzantion has more food than my meager happiness will allow me to really use for a very long time, so I may as well get the extra production and health from this position.



    I immediately begin my research with Masonry, which in DoC not only gives me access to the marble underneath Korinthos, but also lets me adopt the Forced Labor Civic (aka whipping). Greece may not have quite the whip necessity as many other civs, especially when played long-term, but it’s a good option to have. Both of my cities start off building Work Boats which will hugely expand my food supply once Korinthos’ borders expand. Korinthos follows its boat with another, while Byzantion will build a Pagan Temple which will help with both happiness and culture.

    My next priority is Animal Husbandry. I can’t speak for everyone, but I love me some tile improvements, and Byzantion is surrounded with Sheep I can’t wait to fence in. As my research and construction continues, I notice that the Great Sphinx, which in DoC replaces Stonehenge, has been completed. To my surprise, it belongs to Babylon, while the Egyptians have gotten DoC’s version of the Hanging Gardens, which are available with Pottery. Looks like both those civs are off to a great start. I suppose it should be noted that in DoC, only civs which run the religious civic Pantheon are allowed to build wonders like these, so the fact that China or India hasn’t snagged one is no fault of their own.

    Once Korinthos finishes its second Work Boat, it immediately begins work on the Great Cothon, which is DoC’s version of the Moai Statues, though it’s a World Wonder instead of a National one. Once Animal Husbandry has been researched, I start in on building Pastures alongside the mines and roads my workers have already been constructing. Research is directed toward Priesthood, and the Phoenicians decide to say hello and an Open Borders agreement is signed. Unfortunately for the Babylonians, they had captured Sur while it had been independent, and when it flipped to Phoenicia the stress, apparently, made them collapse. One less wonder-stealer to worry about, though Persia is almost certain to benefit in the long run.

    After Byzantion finishes its Pagan Temple, it begins on a Work Boat. After reaching size 3, the boat is whipped and a Settler begun. I want to make sure to get my Adriatic outpost up and running before Rome spawns, otherwise it might become very difficult to expand in that direction. Soon enough, I’ve researched Priesthood and it’s time to start on Iron Working. Now, I’m sure anyone who’s familiar with RFC, or really Civ IV in general, realizes the importance of Priesthood, in that it unlocks the very powerful Oracle. One might wonder, then, why I would go after Iron Working next. Well, in DoC the Oracle (and Liberalism, for that matter) can only be used to research a tech if you’re already in that tech’s era. So, in order to get any real use out of the Oracle, I need to at least be in the Classical Era. I could try going for Medieval, but between Rome, Persia, and Egypt, I think I’d end up getting beat to the Oracle. So I’m researching Iron Working since it’s rather cheap with the intent of using the Oracle on an expensive Classical tech.



    It doesn't take long before Byzantium finishes its Settler and work begins on the Temple of Artemis. The Greek UP works especially well with wonders that give free Specialists, so this wonder is especially strong. At this time I also get a fun little quest. I’m not sure if I’ll be able to finish it, as it will probably be a while until I have 7 cities, let alone 7 Libraries, but it’s a long time until the Renaissance, so we’ll see. The Settler heads to the Adriatic to found Salona, which begins work on a Pagan Temple. I forgot to take a screenshot of the founding of Salona but you can see its location in a few other screenshots. It may not be as powerful a location as Korinthos or Byzantion but it has a nice balance of food and production, plus gives me access to Pigs and Bronze.



    Shortly after Salona is founded, Korinthos finishes the Great Cothon. My first wonder! First of many, if things go to plan. Baby steps. In any case, Korinthos will follow this with a Pagan Temple, a Library, and a Barracks. Between the Cothon and the mines which now fill Greece proper, Korinthos should be able to finish out its basic infrastructure in just a few turns. Rome’s spawn reminds me that I can’t ignore my military much longer, most of which will have to come from Korinthos, as Salona has a lot of infrastructure to build and Byzantion will be busy with wonders. Chopping helps Salona finish its Pagan Temple quickly, and I decide it should pop out a Work Boat before starting on the Oracle. At the current rate the Oracle will finish only a few turns after I get Iron Working, just as planned. As you can see, even random villagers are pitching in to ensure the lasting greatness of Hellas. Sure, all they can do is build a fence, but hey, every little bit helps.



    Once Korinthos finishes its Barracks, I decide to build up my army a little bit. Unfortunately, I haven’t yet finished mining the Bronze and I haven’t discovered Iron Working or Archery, so my only options are Warrior and Scout. If I had been smarter I probably would have just built some Walls or a Granary but instead I built some Warriors on the idea that they can be upgraded in a pinch and they’re just as effective as anything else once I’m a Monarchy. I only manage to build 2 before the Bronze is connected and I’m able to start pumping out Hoplites along with a few Spearmen. With Korinthos’ production they only take 2 turns each, so it’s not long at all until I have enough of an army that I think I’ll survive the inevitable Roman or Persian attack.

    After Iron Working is discovered, research is begun on Monotheism. In DoC Monotheism founds Zoroastrianism rather than Judaism, but Persia has it at spawn and they already exist (though I haven’t met them yet) so it’s really not that important a tech for me. It is, however, on the line toward Theology, and I would absolutely love to found Catholicism ASAP. Even without the shrine wealth, which will probably get up to 20 quickly, it would be well worth my time just for the relationship bonuses and happiness buildings. Byzantium is quickly become a GP beast even without running specialists and it will become more of one once it completes its next project, the Ishtar Gate. This wonder increases your enemies’ War Weariness, which can’t be a bad thing. To the west, Salona completes the Oracle and starts on a Library while emphasizing food. With Oracle I take Metal Casting, which is an amazing tech, allowing Forges, Triremes, and the Colossus.

    My first Great Person, a GS named Pythagoras, knows, like, a lot about triangles. So much, in fact, that he builds an Academy in Korinthos dedicated solely to them. Even the band is nothing but Triangle players. It sounds awful. Byzantium quickly completes the Ishtar Gate and moves on to a Library of its own, to be followed shortly by the Great Lighthouse. Once Monotheism is finished, we move on to Theology, which promises to take quite some time. Assuming I finish it before an Independent spawns Christianity, it will be well worth every turn. The Egyptians continue their solid game by finishing the Pyramids, I believe by using a Great Engineer. This is why I’m glad not to have bothered trying to get that wonder. Doing so would likely have just pushed the Egyptians in toward one I actually want.

    While Korinthos continues pumping out a military and Salona grows a bit, Byzantium begins its work on the Great Lighthouse. Shortly thereafter, Kraisos, a Great Merchant, is born there, and takes off for India via Phoenicia and Persia. Luckily, he doesn’t run into any trouble en route and brings in a hefty 1100 gold when he finally arrives there. 1100 gold goes a long way at this stage of the game, let me tell you. Once Salona finishes the Library, work begins on the Colossus. Kraisos is nice enough to introduce us to the Persians during his journey, and they are more than willing to Open Borders. Several turns later, he would pull the same trick with India, but at that point my attention was elsewhere as those wretched Italians declared war on me!



    Now for those of you who don’t play DoC, the Roman UP gives them a free army consisting of 2 Legions and a Catapult the first time they declare war on a Mediterranean civ. This army shows up somewhere in the vicinity of one of that civ’s cities. So it was that a Roman army appeared right in between all my cities. Unfortunately for the Romans, I was prepared for their treachery, and had 3 Hoplites and a Spearman in all of my cities. While I couldn’t defeat their army in the field, I was pretty sure they wouldn’t be able to get into any of my cities without reinforcements. They could, however, pillage at will. That they did, knocking out my access to both Iron and Bronze before settling in to bombard Salona. With my metals cut off, preventing me from building any more of an army, I focused instead on building a navy. If I could make sure the Romans couldn’t reinforce their army, they’d have no choice but to retreat back from whence they came or kill themselves on one of my fortified stacks.

    With Salona finishing construction on the Colossus and Byzantium whipping the last bit of the Great Lighthouse, all 3 cities begin to churn out Triremes. The battle in the Adriatic swung wildly, with attacks and counterattacks interrupted by Pirates attacking ships from both sides. More importantly, the Roman city of Mediolanum was captured by Celtic barbarians from the north, and the Phoenicians of Carthage, seeing an opportunity to humble their Latin rivals, declared war in support of their Greek brothers. Pressed on all sides and suffering grievous naval losses, the Romans broke off their siege of Salona, though they stopped short of ceasing hostilities.

    Far away, the Egyptians continued their strong showing, completing the Colosseum in Niwt-Rst, of all things. In DoC, the Colosseum is a wonder (the building is now called an Amphitheater) that gives +50% unit construction in addition to 4 XP to all units built there. Though I’m not particularly worried about the Egyptians themselves, I would hate to see what the Arabs might do should they get a hold of a wonder like that. The Egyptians celebrate their new wonder by offering me Open Borders. Sounds good to me. The Chinese and Indians showed signs of life as well, completing the Terracotta Army (which increases Great General emergence) and the Kashi Vishnawath, respectively. Closer to home, the citizens of Salona, perhaps considering the retreat of the Romans a miracle of some sort, began professing beliefs the likes of which had never been seen before. That’s right, research on Theocracy was finished, Christianity was born, the Middle Ages are upon us, and Hellas stands ready to reconnect its metals and show Rome why it never should have messed with Greeks to begin with.



    So here we are. We’ve managed our first big goal (founding Christianity), gotten pillaged a little by the Romans, and built all sorts of wonders. Hope everyone is enjoying things so far. I honestly don’t know where exactly I should go from here. I could try to push into Italy, expand into Anatolia or the northern Black Sea, or just turtle up and build build build. I’m open to any suggestions, feedback, whatever you guys have to offer. Until next time!
     
  6. strijder20

    strijder20 Wallowing in irony

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    Nice. Your images don't work, though :(
     
  7. brandon.herren

    brandon.herren NorthKorea Waterbottles:)

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    Interesting story. I've never tried DoC, but I think I'll try it now.
     
  8. Caesar Augustus

    Caesar Augustus Prince

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    Hence the spree of editing. They should work now if I'm not mistaken.
     
  9. Tycho

    Tycho AFK Forum Warrior

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    Nice update, and good planning ahead with the Romans treachery.
     
  10. MoreEpicThanYou

    MoreEpicThanYou The most Epic.

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    I've NEVER seen a Greece RFC story without Athens and normal Byzantion before, but your city placement turned out great. Good story.
     
  11. trexeric

    trexeric (or backwards 'cirexert')

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    Great! Keep up the good work!
     
  12. hoplitejoe

    hoplitejoe Top fun-poster

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    :agree: I think quite a few people will be sad not to see Constantinople.
     
  13. thecaesar

    thecaesar Will appear randomly

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  14. Princeof Persia

    Princeof Persia Emperor

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  15. Verarde

    Verarde Pondering Wearing A Hat

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    I like this! I'll continue watching it!
     
  16. Caesar Augustus

    Caesar Augustus Prince

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    Chapter 2: Hellas Innovative​

    Saving my game reveals that I’ve founded Christianity in 80 BC, which while certainly no kind of a record seems just fine to me. Unfortunately, I’ve had to ignore much of the rest of the tech tree to get there. I had hoped that someone other than Rome would have gotten Alphabet by now, but the AI (except possibly China, whom I still haven’t met) isn’t being agreeable. So I guess I’ll have to research it myself. With the Romans retreating and their navy vastly reduced and cowering in Pompeii, I decide I no longer need to focus so directly on my military. Besides, the Hagia Sophia is too good of a wonder to delay, so I begin constructing it in Korinthos. A neat little event boosts Korinthos’ production even further. Every little bit helps.



    The Roman army which had retreated from Salona took relatively little time in retaking Mediolanum from the Celts. Hopefully they’ll remain pinned down there defending from further barbarian incursions. Phoenicia has gotten itself into a war with Persia and they request my help. I wish I could, but I hardly fancy going to war against both of my most powerful neighbors simultaneously. Besides, I’ve been on great terms with Persia throughout this game and I’d hate to change that. With the Great Lighthouse giving my cities extra trade routes, I need Open Borders with as many civs as possible, the larger the better. Sorry Hannibal. Maybe some other time.

    The discovery of Alphabet indicates immediately another reason not to burn my bridges with the Persians, as they (and everyone else, for that matter) have several techs for trade. Obviously I won’t be trading away Alphabet (to keep them from trading with each other as long as possible) or Theology (to make sure nobody builds the Apostolic Palace before I switch out of Pantheon), but that still leaves me with a valuable bargaining chip: Metal Casting. That, along with Monotheism, nets me Agriculture, Archery, and Mathematics from the Phoenicians. I also get Monarchy from the Persians. I decide to follow Alphabet with Aesthetics, which I am glad to find nobody has yet researched. I won’t be able to build the Parthenon as it is made obsolete by Theology, but it gets me the Statue of Zeus and, more importantly, one step closer to Literature.



    At this time Rome accepts peace on equal terms. I ended up deciding that trying to assault Italy would be both too costly and too risky. In any case I’d like for someone else to shoulder some of the burden of holding off the barbarians once they start hitting in force. Once peace is signed I decide it’s a good time to adopt Monarchy and let my cities really start to grow. I’m lucky enough that a Great Prophet (Herakleitos) is born in Byzantion. He hurries over to Salona to build the Church of the Holy Selpuchre. The income starts small but it won’t take long to get up to speed. In the mean time I’m able to maintain 100% research by whittling through the money gotten by Kraisos' Indian Adventure. When and if that gets low, I’ve got more GMs where he came from. So economically I’m pretty much set until sometime in the Renaissance, unless I start expanding willy-nilly.



    Korinthos completes the Hagia Sophia quite quickly, I’m happy to say. And none too soon, either. I’m not entirely sure what victory I’m going to go after, but Cultural is as good as any and Korinthos was starting to fall behind my other cities after their wonder-spam. Egypt, itself unstable, declares war on the even-less-stable Phoenicia. I would imagine that they had been asked by Persia, but in any case once Persia takes Sur it’s game over for the Phoenicians. Glad I got those techs out of them while they existed. Babylon’s early exit does seem to have strengthened the Persians, and they even begin expanding in Anatolia. They’re picking awful locations, sure, but I don’t like the concept one bit. I guess it’s better them than the Arab. Halfway across the world, the Mahabodi is built. I’m more than a little amused that the Great Prophet they use to build it is none other than Siddharta Gautama himself. That Indian AI sure knows his (her? its?) history. I’m really racing ahead technologically now, and with Aesthetics out of the way I’m on to Literature. Persia seems to think I’d like Calendar, which is true enough. However, I will certainly not give him Theology for it.

    It’s funny to think about, but with all my worrying about the Romans and barbarians, I haven’t gotten into a real land battle yet. This changes with the first big wave of barbarians crossing my northwest border. All told 3 Swordsmen and something like 6 Axemen make their way toward Salona. Unlike the Romans, I know they won’t retreat and I’d rather not let them pillage at will, so I move several Hoplites and Spearmen into the woods and hills surrounding the city. I do end up losing a Hoplite or two but nothing too worrisome. They are just the first wave, however, and many more stacks of footmen, and the occasional Horse Archer, will plague me for quite some time. In other Greek games, I’ve founded Ephesus 2 tiles south of Salona. I was worried that would overlap too much with Korinthos and this placement of Byzantion, but now I’m beginning to worry that by putting Salona so far north I’m just making it harder for the central European barbarians to reach Rome. Oh well, nothing to do about it now but kill the barbarians and move on.



    As the barbarians move on Salona, it begins constructing the Statue of Zeus. Byzantion starts on a Settler, which will hopefully slow the Persian expansion into Anatolia. One can only hope. Korinthos continues churning out military units, both to replace losses expected in the north and garrison the new city I intend to found. The switch to Monarchy has really ramped up my population growth, which passes the million mark. In a bit of helpful timing, my research on Literature ends just as a Great Merchant (Androsthenes) is born in Salona. He (mostly) bulbs Currency and I push on toward Meditation.

    At this point I notice that Egypt is willing to trade Calendar and hasn’t yet discovered Metal Casting, so I get yet another tech. Now that I think of it, Metal Casting had been my Oracle tech, so in a way I’ve now gotten 6 free techs (Agriculture, Archery, Mathematics, Monarchy, Calendar, and Metal Casting itself) out of that wonder. Not bad, not bad at all. It turns out to be 350 AD. Two turns later I’ve discovered Meditation and it’s time to get started on Music. If I do end up pursuing a Culture victory I’ll be glad to have a free Great Artist and the Sistine Chapel is a great wonder to boot.

    Once Byzantion finishes its Settler, it begins construction of the Pantheon, which in DoC replaces the Leaning Tower. Byzantion, already filled with wonders and capable of supporting quite a few specialists, is going to absolutely spill over with Great People once that wonder is complete. Things sure are going swimmingly since we made peace with the Romans. Say, what have they been up to recently? And why in the world do they have 5 Legions sitting in the neutral land between me and Persia? I guess they were spawned by their UP (maybe they went to war with Persia or Egypt and I didn’t notice) and got bumped there culturally. Probably no big deal…



    Those Latin swine! Just marching up toward Byzantion like they owned the place. At least they didn’t head toward newly founded Sinope, which had a much smaller garrison. Still, Byzantion wasn’t exactly a fortress itself. It only had a few more troops than Salona had during the first Greco-Roman war, and the army facing it was much larger. Luckily Korinthos had been producing troops pretty much nonstop since completing the Hagia Sophia in order to protect against the barbarians. These were redeployed toward Byzantion. I guess barbarians and Romans aren’t so very different.

    Across the Mediterranean, Paraitonion, which had become Independent after revolting from Egypt, was the site of a Greek revolt. Of course, I would have razed it as it offers me nothing I wouldn’t rather get from Alexandria, but it’s a good sign that my culture is starting to have an impact. A few turns later the barbarians took care of it for me anyway. Even further afield, I got the news that China had collapsed in 425. I was briefly surprised but I guess it does make sense; the early Chinese AI doesn’t really build many units. Without the Great Wall they aren’t really well-prepared to defend against the barbarians coming their way, and in this game they hadn’t managed to build it. I have no doubt that the Chinese will rise again, but we’ll see how this impacts the game long-term.

    Another Great Scientist is born and he heads to the besieged Byzantion to found another Academy. This one has markedly fewer triangle-related courses, though it, too, is important toward our research. With the Statue of Zeus now completed in Salona (giving some much needed culture to Sinope, as well), we begin construction on the Mausoleum of Maussollos. I’m not particularly planning on having tons of Golden Ages, but my UP gives me so darn many Great People that it’s possible I’ll run out of other good uses for them. And if I’m gonna have GA’s, I’d love for them to last that extra bit longer.

    As my units stream into Byzantium by land and sea, I begin losing naval battles, not only to Romans but also to pirates. Simultaneously, a smallish stack of barbarian axeman loitered north of Byzantium. Obviously it would be a disaster if the Romans were able to reinforce, and even destroying my fishing boats or cutting off my ability to transport my troops freely by sea would be a heavy blow. As my city defenses in Byzantion decreased, and my garrison increased, the Roman AI would become increasingly likely to attempt an attack. Which I didn’t especially mind, exactly, but if their catapult were lucky they very well might have escaped without taking too many casualties. Even if they didn’t escape, with good timing they might weaken me for a barbarian attack. On the other hand, they had only retreated from Salona after bombarding it down to 8%. It looked to me like they might do the same thing here, but in this case a retreat would have been as dangerous as an attack, if not more. They would have had no choice but to retreat toward Sinope which, as I said, wasn’t terribly well-defended. And so it became clear: I would have to force a decision. The course of the war, and perhaps the Greek nation, would be decided in the Byzantine plains.





    Ooooh, CLIFFHANGER!!! Will the larger and better-trained Greek army prevail, or will the more advanced and fortified Romans hold out? Tune in next time to find out!
     
  17. hoplitejoe

    hoplitejoe Top fun-poster

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    I would have settled a city that wasn't in a flip zone, good luck with the RNG anyway :D
     
  18. brandon.herren

    brandon.herren NorthKorea Waterbottles:)

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    Tell that to thecaesar :p
     
  19. thecaesar

    thecaesar Will appear randomly

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    Yeah, tell that to thecaesar! :lol:

    GO ROME!!! RAZE... um...well... actually, CAPTURE SALONA AND BYZANTION!!!!
     
  20. Tycho

    Tycho AFK Forum Warrior

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    Nice work so far :). This going extremely well for you, all things considered.
     

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