1. We have added a Gift Upgrades feature that allows you to gift an account upgrade to another member, just in time for the holiday season. You can see the gift option when going to the Account Upgrades screen, or on any user profile screen.
    Dismiss Notice

RFRE - Guide under Construction

Discussion in 'Civ3 - Creation & Customization' started by pinktilapia, Jan 29, 2006.

  1. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire

    A Guide

    Original scenario design by pinktilapia
    Written by
    - pinktilapia
    - IXIRandyIXI
    - Captain Beaver
    - Drendor
    - Blitzkrieg80
    - Christophoros
    - Aeron
    - your name here!


    This guide is being written to facilitate new players progression in RFRE, an overall rather complex and frustrating scenario designed for Civilization III. It is based on an original guide written by IXIRandyIXI in the early times of the beta (it was never updated since), and on a handbook by me that was never released. Hopefully this guide will be useful to the majority of the people who read it. Since to complete such a guide will require quite a bit of work, this is going to be a work in progress to which everone is invited to contribute: it will be progressively improved following the suggestions and comments that you make. Those willing to take over an unwritten section of the guide, or to review one in details, are very much welcome to do so.

    Outline

    I. Introduction
    1. About the Guidebook
    2. Game overview
    3. Why can't I play another civilization?

    II. Downloads
    III. General Guide

    1. General tips and tricks
    i.Build a successful economy
    ii.Micromanagement?
    iii.Balance your military with your economy
    iv.Expand rapidly and constantly
    v.Read the Civilopedia
    vi.On the importance of slavery
    vii.Use diplomacy with tact
    viii.Understand and use your troops wisely
    ix.Prepare strong lines of defence
    x.Use dirty tricks when desperate
    2. The map
    i.Regions
    ii.Terrains
    iii.Resources
    3. The civilizations
    i.Rome
    ii.Carthage
    iii.The Greeks
    iv.Pontus and Armenia
    v.The Parthians and Sassanids
    vi.Numidia and the Vandals
    vii.The Celts, Germanics and Goths
    viii.The Scythians
    ix.The Illyrians and Pirates
    4. The units
    i. General
    ii.Rome
    iii.Carthage
    iv.The Greeks
    v.Pontus and Armenia
    vi.The Parthians and Sassanids
    vii.Numidia and the Vandals
    viii.The Celts, Germanics and Goths
    ix.The Scythians
    x.The Illyrians and Pirates
    ix.Naval Warfare
    x.Great Leaders
    5. The Cities
    i.General improvements
    ii.Roman improvements
    iii.Ancient wonders
    iv.Roman wonders
    IV. Research
    V. Walkthrough

    1. Pushing Phyrrus the Great back into the sea
    2. First Punic War: Claiming Sicily
    3. Abusing the Cisalpine gauls and Queen Teuta
    4. Building in Italy and taming the Greek colonies
    5. Meeting Hannibal: Second and third Punic wars
    6. Moving east: Macedonian and Greek wars
    7. Conquest of Iberia
    8. Civil unrests and eastern extension: Sulla and Pompey
    9. Conquests of the Gauls: Caesar
    10. Triumvirate, civil wars and the first Emperor
    11. A bit of peace and the Conquest of Britannia
    12. Defeating the Dacians
    13. Pax Romana: the Roman Golden Age
    14. Commodus, the Severans and the Crisis of the Third Century
    15. Soldier-Emperors and Constantine the Great
    16. The rise of the Christian faith and the Great Invasions
    17. Justinian and his legacy

    I will post below, each section in a separate post, according to what I have currently, mostly thanks to IXIRandyIXI. Please feel free to take each of them for review, improvement, or just rewrite them completely according to your game experience. Note that the section III.4 and III.5 will be very similar to the pedia, so I think there is no need for anyone do them, I will just put the pedia pictures and the the characteristics of the buillding/units. We can then discuss them, and come out with a complete guidebook soon (in PDF format). Let's keep the English editions for the end though!

    Everytime I update a post according to comments, I will put a UPDATED on the top of the post (with a date).
     
  2. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    I. Introduction
     
  3. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    II. Downloads
     
  4. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    III. General Guide

    1. General tips and tricks

    i.Build a successful economy

    During the early game (meaning up until the second Punic War probably) this is not too much of a concern. Your cities are too small to make a lot of money and consequently, the only early economic building, the mercatus, will not help significantly. However, there are still some things to do to avoid getting bankrupt. First of all, don't build many units in the same cities. As you will find out, most units have a pop cost ranging from 1 to 3. If you build 2 or even 3 Legios in the same city, it will likely fall to 1 pop and stall the rest of the production. It does not mean you have to refrain from building units, but you must do it wisely. For example, a city without an aquaeductus or access to a river cannot grow beyond pop 5. In order to maximize your pop growth, try to crank out a velites or a Legio every time it is about to reach that number. At the same time, try to keep some big cities. Rome and Capua are prime early example as their production is so high it is best to keep their pop up in order to build units without pop costs and wonders which will come sooner or later. Plus, the surrounding area is easily roaded early on and these cities can support units built by the rest of the empire.

    On buildings, try to keep this rule : check out how much money a given city is putting in your treasury. If the upkeep costs for improvements are higher, stop building improvements or units, road the area, wait for the population to grow and try to build the free improvements. However, you should probably build the basic infrastructure in most cities, meaning delubrum, fabrica, portus, domus discendi, mercatus (this can wait though), templum (it can wait too but try to get 8 fast because it gives the ability to build a happiness wonder) in that order (that's my way, you can find your own). Also, in newly conquered cities, as their population is either resisting or not really productive (like 2-3 shields per turn), try to rush a Legio or a Faber before any roman population appears. Why? Because if you build these units with foreign nationals, they will be free of support (they are considered slaves or something)! The problem is that as soon as even 1 roman pop goes in the unit, it is considered roman and requires support.

    So, the early game consists of building improvements and units intelligently to avoid depleting the city or having too much upkeep from infrastructure. Use slaves to road around to raise extra money, farm and then build mines evenly for Italia. Most of all, build all the wonders as fast as you can, but pay special attention to the PRAETORIUM, which reduces corruption in all cities. The Praetor should not be made too early, you must consider the 20 support cost! In general, do not build that until I have an ‘empire’!

    For the republican era (from the second Punic War up to the beginning of the empire, things are different. Not only the aquaeductus (that you should have started to build in important cities) will increase the general population of the empire, but you get the second economic building, the latifundia. Combined with a good road network, this additional pop and money bonus will make your good cities thriving commercial centres. The idea now becomes to specialize your different parts of the empire. Everything around Roma (meaning cities not too far away that do not suffer crippling corruption/waste problems) should be money making cities. The mercatus, templum, catasta (makes slaves that you will very much need to improve an ever growing empire) and latifundia are a must there. The outer cities, while waiting to get more production from mines or more pop, should be building more units than buildings. Thus, you get a rich core that can build units from time to time (when their pop reaches 10 most of the time) and outlying villages that form the backbone of your military strength. As you expend, the cores get bigger, richer and supports even more units to conquer even more land. The must have wonder there is the Lex Agraria. Try to take as many cities before building that wonder. It enables the construction of civitas (reduces corruption, resistant to propaganda, reduces war weariness) in your cities for a short period of time.

    Input is needed for the imperial era

    ii.Micromanaging cities?

    A deciding factor on how hard your game is how FAST you do your turns.

    Do you micromanage your cities or do you leave them to the governor? Some players micromanage a lot, even at 100+ cities (even, one has to admit, it takes too much time, some having spent 500 hours on 1 game only).

    Why do we speakabout micromanaging? Well for starters, many good units cost 1 or several pop to build. So it is important that you synchronize pop growth with production. I don’t know if the governor can handle this. You don’t wanna build a pop costing unit with an ALMOST full granary, since the granary will be emptied when the city decrease in size due to the pop costing unit being built. Exception; units like ballista, catapults and ships (I seldom build ships, save cumba) which have no pop costs. If you build pop costing units several turns in a row in the same city you are slowly and gradually decreasing the city production, which can be hurtful in the long run. Pay attention to cities with both large farming/fishing potential and good shield production, those cities will be the main sites to recruit legions.

    Also taxmen play a more important role, increasing gold to treasury with 4/taxmen you promote. You have workers who give you food or production that would be waste? Promote them to taxmen instead. Some turns you can harvest 200-300 gold from taxmen only....

    It is also important how you change between building military units and city improvements.

    Don’t make the mistake of building lots of infrastructure like the production, science and money buildings and temples in 5-10 pop cities for at the end we will not able support these AND an army and lagged behind.

    The aqueduct costs a lot too, so it should be recommended to ONLY building them where there's tons of food and even then, if people aren't happy (war weariness), they won't eat and you have -3 maintenance you can't get rid of!

    Regarding the portus commerci; dont forget it has other advantages besides the commerce, justifying its heavy maintainance cost: Usually the extra commerce is just about enough to pay for its own upkeep. The function of the portus commerci as granary will prove even more important after the age of Commodus. And the ability to connect trade and reallocate troops is important too.

    One city improvement that is generally a good idea to build no matter how small the city is the mercator (marketplace) as it require only 1 gold upkeep to get 50% more gold to treasury from that city. Only if the corruption is skyhigh should you refuse to build it. Although, at the beginning at least, your cities have almost no road, no pop and are in small numbers so the mercatus will only add like 1 or 2 gold which is barely worth what it costs in upkeep, considering the time spent building it. Certainly, as soon as you get aquaeductus and the Italian cities are almost all above 6 pop with many roads around them, it becomes an essential improvement. You might consider building the domus discendi before the mercatus in all your cities, since these will help you to save money through more effective ‘research’.

    The same goes with defensive infrastructure; You will for example notice that it just costs way too much to have a Portus and Arx Litoralis in every city in Sicily, Corsica, and Sardinia... To the point you should sometime consider paying for extra troops rather than supporting the buildings building.

    All these factors make players very hesitant regarding leaving city handling to the governor.....

    But... warning

    Sure, you should probably micromanage especially at the beginning when it is doable, but some fun is lost since you spend all those hours making sure you maximize production, growth and commerce. However, at least do try to finish a unit when the city reaches max pop and in between, build improvements. Not everybody need to micromanage thw whole Empire in order to win, for it can simply kills the fun.

    iii.Balance your military with your economy

    Just always keep in mind that you must always balance your military and economy in RFRE: if you concentrate too much on either, your Empire will surely suffer.

    As a faction, Rome has several rules distinction with other civilizations. First, it can only support a limited number of units, whatever the size of its empire. Currently, the maximum free support is 40 units. Units maintained in excess must be paid for, by the Roman treasure. The cost per unit in excess depends of the Roman government. Republic and Christian Principate are highest with 6 gold per turn and per unit, while Absolute Principate is lowest with only 4 gold per turn. Triumvirate Republic and Principate are intermediate at 5 gold per turn. Meanwhile, Rome has access to plenty of units which never require support. These are typically foot auxiliaries consisting of barbarians or local levies. Late in game, Rome will also increase its reliance on mercenaries, due to internal troubles.

    iv.Expand rapidly and constantly

    Be aggressive! If you sit around and waste time Empire-building while there’s still nations out there to conquer, then you’re bound to fall behind and have trouble keeping up with the game.

    Avoid wars that you are not prepared for. If you go off wasting units on pointless wars, you may be set back for years! As a general rule, especially in the early game, waging two wars (or more!) at the same time is a very bad idea.

    However, don’t feel rushed to conquer all territories around you. Try to follow that the Romans did by a certain time period but remember that you have until around 200 AD (and even some time after, once you are done with the Crisis of the Third Century) to conquer all of “real” Rome’s territories and to build up your borders before you’re going to run into any major barbarian invasions.

    v.Read the Civilopedia

    Thoroughly read the Civilopedia descriptions for units, improvements, and wonders. Sometimes it may contain information that is vital for your understanding of the purpose of that unit, improvement, or wonder. This guide can in no way cover all that is included in the pedia!

    vi.On the importance of slavery UPDATED

    Slavery is central to the development of your land. They will be the key to farming, and greatly help in mining, road building or cutting down forests. The small number of servi and your sole faber should all, at the beginning, build roads, not mines. You need the trade bonuses much more than the production increase in order to field a balanced economy in the first 50 turns. Legions can build fortifications and roads, but will not farm your lands! Try to use Slaves in groups of 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32. In these numbers, you waste the least amount of worker turns while improving terrain. You can supplement the slaves and legions with engineers, who will greatly boost the speed of public and military works. They are however expensive and need to be supported. To be sure you get enough of these slow working slaves, you will need to be aggressive and wage wars. Legions and regular cavalry can quickly capture many slaves. Slaves market, once built, also will create slaves regularly for you to use. Also, remember that these are the same slaves you can use in great games to be held in cities, especially if these have an amphitheatre! This can help to strengthen the patriotism of newly conquered cities and avoid culture flip. You will find that developing a serious network of roads as Rome expands will be crucial to the success of future wars. Make sure your legions are busy in period of peace.

    vii.Use diplomacy with tact

    Be careful in your diplomatic negotiations. Do your best to never break an agreement and ruin your reputation and never declare war on a nation before cancelling your Right of Passage agreement with them.

    Take note of all the nations that you can make military alliances with. Use these alliances to your advantage: turn the Greek nations against each other to weaken them before you invade, use Syria to weaken the Asian nations (and themselves) before you invade them, etc. Be careful not too weaken a civilization too much if you are not ready to invade it though, as it will be an easy prey to its powerful neighbours. A Parthian Empire covering the whole Seleucid area is pretty lethal.

    viii.Understand and use your troops wisely

    Use your high-HP Legion Armies to cover up your lower-HP Legions and other troops as you invade roaded countries so as to cut down on the losses when conquering other nations. Be careful when you do this, however; as some nations have equally strong army-like units that can defeat your Legion Armies. Use a cover of range firing troops to weaken strong enemies before attacking. Velites or ballistas are early examples of troops able to do so.

    When attacking cities and units, try to eliminate all defensive bonuses that the enemy has: attack from hills if they are defending on hills, destroy their walls, never attack across rivers, etc. This will help you to avoid unnecessary casualties during wartime.

    ix.Prepare strong lines of defence

    When invading nations such as Carthaginian Spain, try and hold off your invasion for a while after declaring war so that you can destroy all of their strong army-like units (e.g. Hannibal’s armies) before you invade. The AI will generally send these troops in to invade your territory and will often place them at a disadvantage so that you can defeat them easily. Take advantage of the AI’s lack of tactics to defeat them! If you don’t, then you will probably suffer high casualties during your conquests.

    Later on, you will have to develop a huge defence system at your borders, and these borders should be coherent and exploiting natural defence, such as hills and rivers (especially combined). It might not look like you will need it during the Golden Age, but believe me, the Great Invasions are difficult to apprehend in their scope!

    x.Use dirty tricks when desperate

    First, although not a dirty trick proper, make sure you save often and that you keep a save at each keep point of your game. A bad luck in major battle, a tricky attack in the back from a neighbour while already in the midst of a major Germanic invasion, many occasions can ruin your game and make it non-winnable at the end. Considering the time you need to invest to finish a RFRE game, it might be good to be able to restart from a sound basis a few decades ago if things really goes grim, rather than from the start.

    Use your ability to sign Rights of Passage with other nations to gouge gold from the AI. Even from your 2nd turn in the game, you should be more powerful than some of the nations across the Med. and they will gladly pay up to be able to enter your territory (though likely never will!). Try to avoid signing RoP’s with nations that can build Hidden Nationality units (Pirates, Raiders, revolting tribes), though: that will cause you an awful lot of trouble!

    Further with RoP agreements: use your ability to enter their territory to set up an attack that can take multiple cities in one turn. Just make sure to wait until the turn that you can cancel the RoP and cancel the RoP before declaring war. Though this tactic is considered cheating by many Civers, I consider it a perfectly viable military option when I need to deal a crippling blow to a nation and quickly conquer it.

    More tricks and tips?
     
  5. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    2. The map

    The map used for the campaign 275BC-625AC is modified from TAM. Made slightly smaller, and with different terrain, it offers detailed landscape and yet a game going smoothly without long waiting periods between turns. Italy has been slightly oversized for obvious reasons, while the lands east of the Caspian Sea have been removed to ensure that the area remains unsettled, even by barbarians. There is a light twist: the map is not strictly organized along a north-south vertical axis. Mountains are strictly impassable by all units, while some terrains allow barbarians or only some specialized units to go though, such as swamps, marshes, and deserts. Roads are difficult to build, like any other terrain improvement in the mod, but they allow the units to move very quickly throughout the map, at a rate of 5 road squares per turn. Having a good network of road will be the key to a Roman victory.

    i.Regions

    ii.Terrains

    iii.Resources
     
  6. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    3. The Civilizations

    Facing Rome are many nations. Scattered along the eastern Mediterranean Sea, the descendants of Alexander have lost their way and are plunged in sterile wars with their neighbours. While some are kept some of their strength, most will not be able to resist long to a serious Roman offensive. South of Rome, along the North African coast, is a far more serious opponent. Carthage has both an unmatched fleet and a vast army of mercenaries led by the dreaded Barca family. North of the lands of Etruria, lay vast territories dominated by barbarian tribes. Whether they are Celts, Iberics, Germanics, Dacians, or Scythians, these barbarians are to be feared for their valour and numbers. Only Rome’s greatest generals such as Marius or Caesar will be able to defeat the proud nations of the North. There are other far flung challengers to Rome’s call to dominate the known world. Parthians have conquered most of Persia and Mesopotamia from the Seleucids. Their new empire is huge and powerful, their highly mobile horse archers remain unmatched. Pontus is another powerhouse of the east, and it will not look favourably at a Roman infringement of their Asian affairs.

    i.Rome
    ii.Carthage
    iii.The Greeks
    iv.Pontus and Armenia
    v.The Parthians and Sassanids
    vi.Numidia and the Vandals
    vii.The Celts, Germanics and Goths
    viii.The Scythians
    ix.The Illyrians and Pirates
     
  7. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    4. The units

    i. General
    ii.Rome
    iii.Carthage
    iv.The Greeks
    v.Pontus and Armenia
    vi.The Parthians and Sassanids
    vii.Numidia and the Vandals
    viii.The Celts, Germanics and Goths
    ix.The Scythians
    x.The Illyrians and Pirates
    ix.Naval Warfare
    x.Great Leaders
     
  8. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    5. The Cities

    i.General improvements
    ii.Roman improvements
    iii.Ancient wonders
    iv.Roman wonders
     
  9. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    IV. Research

    In RFRE, research as in Civilization does not exist. Advances represent time and history. Linked to these advances are important historical events, represented either by new units or improvements. There are two concurrent timelines in RFRE. One is run by the AI and is bringing major historical events, which will often have a negative impact on Rome; you are thus running against time. The other consists of advances (timers) which will be yours as soon as the AI discovers them, every 25 turns. Therefore, you do not need to do any research in this timeline (which is called Chronicles) and should focus exclusively on the Roman advances in the later eras, although technically you haves the capacity to research timers.

    The Roman timeline is exclusive to the player and is split in two eras. The first represent the rise of the Republic as well as the peak of the Roman power under the early and middle imperial period. It ends with a taint of gloom, during the Crisis of the 3rd Century. The second era starts during these dark times and, after a short revival, will slowly bring you into times of barbarian invasions, institutional decline, and possibly the fall of Rome. The East should survive, if you do well.

    It is important to note that the minimum research time is set one 12 turns in RFRE, while the maximum is 25 turns. As much as possible, the player should try to keep his research time as close as possible to 12 turns so that you can keep up in the timeline. If you fall behind technology-wise, you may suffer! Being delayed in research will severely affect you in the latest part of the game, through excessive corruption, while you will be missing most if not all the Byzantine era units. There are two exceptions of advances which must be researched into 25 turns. These advances are: Dictator and Age of Augustus, which are usually not researched by acquired for free through a wonder.
     
  10. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    V. Walkthrough

    So, you’ve been thrown into the seat of a Consul of Rome in the year 275 BC. You have Pyrrhus’ armies knocking at the doors of Neapolis; raging tribes are constantly coming forth from Bovianum to raid your Italian provinces and free slaves so that they too can rebel against your rule; Celtic tribes live in Northern Italy and always present a threat; Pirates from Crete and Illyria are constantly raiding your shores; and worst of all, you’re the prime target for the mighty Carthaginian Empire to invade! Sure seems like a lot for little the little ol’ Roman Republic to handle! Well, here’s some detailed section on how to handle all these problems and expand your little nation so that it may grow to become one of the greatest Empires that the world has ever seen! The section are organized as they happened in history, but in your game things may turn differently, so you might need to jump forth and back within the walkthrough from time to time. As a concluding word, the best guidance you can have in RFRE is that it is often easier if you try the play the game following historical events.
     
  11. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    1. Pushing Phyrrus the Great back into the sea

    The first fight for you to undertake is near Neapolis, at Beneventum, where once more you meet Phyrrus and his battle-hardened troops on the battlefield. But this time, the King of Epirus and his hoplites are exhausted. Defeat him and he will be forced back to Greece.
    Don't worry if, after 1 or 2 turns, your cities go into unrest because of your war with Pyrrhus. Just kill him off as soon as possible : if you play well, you can defeat him in 3 turns.

    First, load your consular armies with legions so that they punch a great deal while having a huge resilience to damage. As these are Consular armies, these are allowed to attack only once per turn, but they will be central to your campaigns throughout the early game. Be warned that these two armies, like all others, cannot be replaced. Before letting your Consuls wiping out Pyrrhus’ war elephants, it might be wise to weaken the juggernauts using your Velites, whom can bombard the enemy with javelin at a safe distance. Once Phyrrus has lost his crack troops, let your other legions and allied levies attack. Keep your Equites to finish damaged foes, attack enemy cavalry or peltasts, and of course to pursue fast withdrawing units. If you use your units wisely, you should suffer little to no casualties in this battle. Since the people of Rome and your allies in Italy are cringing of war weariness after these many years of war against the Southern Greek colonies and Phyrrus, push south just after the battle and take the cities of Tarentum and Croton, that will close the ominous episode and certify the supreme rule of Rome over Italy. Although that still leave the city of Bovianum to contest it but their defeat will have to wait until later, as Bovianum is incredibly hard to conquer early on and your efforts are best concentrated elsewhere.
     
  12. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    2. First Punic War: Claiming Sicily

    After that, immediately begin building your army and navy. Don’t build so large an army that it hinders your economy, but build one large enough to handle the tasks ahead. Don’t forget to build a few buildings (the cheap ones at least, such as the Domus Discendi, Portus, etc.) every once and a while and to keep your cities up with a decent population (don’t let a city producing land units in chain). Don’t forget you can draft the Miles Socius! You will have to continue building up your army and navy as you see fit; always try to replace lost troops and never let your troops become obsolete (upgrade them!).

    Likely next will be the First Punic War. You do not need to declare war to Carthage in most cases. The Punics are likely to blackmail you soon enough, and Roman honour will ask for nothing less than bloodshed in response. In your first few turns after having defeated Tarentum, you’ll want to move the majority of your army and navy over to the island of Sicily to prepare for this war. Be sure not too underestimate the demand that will be put on Messana. You can use the large ports located in Neapolis and Messana to ship troops instantly between the two. If Carthage doesn’t demand tribute from you (and you refuse, of course!) by the time you have the majority of your army and navy over at Messana, simply declare war on Carthage to start the First Punic War yourself.

    Try to quickly capture most the Carthaginian cities in Sicily: the easy preys are Agrigentum and Panormus. Lilybaeum will be much harder to crack, but you should do so a few turns later. Be warned that the Punic Navy will rule the Sea and blockade your ports. Massive mercenary’s invasions directly from these boats are likely and you will need legions in your cities to hold them. A mere garrison will be no match. The presence of coastal forts is an asset that cannot be underestimated in Sicily, and not just for this war. The alliance with Syracusae will be crucial in this war. A neutral Syracusae would be acceptable but the risk is that if they are not with you, they might go against you with Carthage. Since they can be a nice buffer between the Punic and you, you should consider enrolling them on your side. Once Sicily is secured, if you can spare them, also ferry a decent (4+) number of your Legions over to Sardinia and Corsica to conquer those cities as well.

    As soon as you can, you will have to try to contest the sea with Carthage, although you can defeat it without doing so. If you are serious about it, build the Mare Nostrum Wonder as soon as available, and put together additional quinquiremes with corvus. Use these wisely, as they are cumbersome, slow, and vulnerable to enemy attack. Based in a strategic harbour, protected with a coastal fort, these covus can intercept enemy ships, and capture them. If you are lucky, you might soon have a decent fleet and rule the coasts of Sicily. Remember however that galleys cost support and that a fleet never win a war.

    Meanwhile in Italy, build up your defences in Pisae for the possible Carthaginian invasion from that direction. Depending on how quickly you complete the First Punic War, you may or may not run into Carthaginian troops on this front. You can never be too prepared! After you’ve captured Sardinia and Corsica, you can either choose to call for peace then, or if you’re really doing well and you’re feeling confident, ship some troops over to the Balearic Islands and capture Palma before suing for peace with Carthage. If you’re lucky, Carthage may even be willing to hand over a small city such as Valentia for a Peace treaty. Take advantage of this, as Valentia will make an excellent invasion point for you in the future.

    Once you sign the peace treaty with Carthage, your first major conflict is complete and Rome has its first province outside Italy: Sicily! The wheat there will be precious for your future expansion.
     
  13. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    3. Abusing the Cisalpine gauls and Queen Teuta

    Now that Carthage probably won’t be too much of a threat for a while, it’s time to expand your Empire with some conquests of your primitive neighbouring nations. Move the majority of your army back on to the Italian peninsula (keep a serious garrison in Sicily just in case though) and set up for an attack of Cisalpine Gauls. You’ll probably want to put two sizeable forces in both Pisae and Ariminium. Once you’re ready, cancel any agreements you have with Cisalpine Gaul and launch your two-pronged invasion into Cisalpine Gaul. It should fall very quickly, though not without a bitter fight, especially near Mediolanum!

    Earlier, while fighting near Sicily, you might have meet pirates. Maybe these were of help to you as they kept the Punic fleet busy, or maybe did they attack your own ships. Such piracy however is unacceptable, and a pirate nation, Illyria under Queen Teuta, is just a boat ride from your coasts. After you defeat Cisalpine Gaul and recuperate your troops, it is time to begin preparing for your invasion of Illyria. Much like Cisalpine Gauls, Illyria will not put up a huge fight, although you should not underestimate them as they can launch pirate raids and their light cavalry is far ranging as well. Their small navy is also impressive, and these Liburnian ships are something Rome will have to keep in mind for future naval developments. If you like launching two-pronged invasions, get some transports in Barium (build or ship them over) and send all your Legions (minus the Legion army) there. Move all your mobile troops (Legion armies, Velites, cavalry) to Ravenna. When ready, attack with your “mobile attack force” from the northern part of Illyria and ship your Legions over near Apollonia to invade from that direction. This way, Illyria will likely fall quickly and you will gain a source of Fine Timber, which will allow you to build more effective forms of warships. After Illyria falls, the armies of Rome should once more head west to further expand the Empire.
     
  14. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    4. Building in Italy and taming the Greek colonies

    If you haven’t run into them already, you’ll eventually meet your friendly neighbours, the raging Samnite tribes that will begin ravaging your Provinces in Italy. It would probably be best to keep a Legion or two – or even a couple Roman cavalry – around to take out these tribes before they start any massive slave rebellions. You may also have problems with barbarian raiders from Germania and Dacia invading Illyria; a few Roman cavalry should be able to handle these raiders as long as they come separately. You may also want to park a few legions in your cities in Sicily to protect them in the upcoming wars.

    Once your problem of defending your borders is dealt with, you can once again concentrate on expanding your borders! One possible move, that can be postponed for later (especially for Bovianum) is to conquer the Greek colonies in Sicily and near the Rhone delta (Massilia). Note that they can also make good potential allies for the coming war against Hannibal, so weight your options carefully. If you decide to open the hostility, move the majority of your army over to Genua and your fleet over near Narbo if you wish so, and make sure you have a good army with siege engines and possibly quinquiremes near Syracusae. When ready, declare war on Magna Graecia and invade. The Western Greek’s Hoplites may fight ferociously to hold on to their colonies, but they are nothing against the might of the Roman Legions. After you’ve captured Syracusae and maybe Saguntum and Narbo, sue for peace with Magna Graecia. Massilia and especially Bovianum are normally well-defended and are very costly to capture this early.

    Since you have now wheat aplenty, start building granaries in key cities, but keep in mind that the great port of Ostia, once expanded, will provide granaries in each and every of your cities. You should so plan to build Ostia and the Portus Migrare (which will grant you with essential fast moving ships for late game strategic move throughout the Mediterranean) as soon as you can, especially since your great port in Neapolis is doomed to become obsolete. These two wonders require two and four portus naves respectively. Plan on this.
     
  15. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    5. Meeting Hannibal: Second and third Punic wars NOT UP-TO-DATE

    With the Roman Empire ever expanding its borders, it is not surprising that conflict with Carthage comes once again. If you were lucky and managed to capture Palma and Valentia in the First Punic War, then send the majority of your army over to Valentia and be ready to invade. If not, then send your army and navy over to Narbo. You might need a right of passage both with the Western Greek and the Celtiberians in order to pass into Punic Spain, so plan on that. It would be very hard and risky to rely on your fleet to carry troops overseas from Italy directly to Southern Spain. Anyway, there’s quite a bit of bitter fighting ahead in this next Great War – The Second Punic War.

    It is critical to note that you won’t be able to take Carthago Nova before it has spawned Hannibal, as before 225BC, the city will be much too well protected. You should thus plan the second Punic War by that time. If you delay it too long, Hannibal will gather many more men and threaten Rome very seriously in a matter of a decade. Be warned, Punic Spain must fall! Keep in mind that the Western Greek, once more, you be good allies in this war, although they will bear the full furore of Hannibal against their positions in Northern Spain. Building the Scipio wonder as soon as possible will be key to victory in Spain, and later in Africa, as these armies have an amphibious capacity (they can attack directly from boats) and can strike twice!

    When ready, cancel any treaties with Carthage and declare war. Don’t send your troops in yet, though! Wait for Carthage to send the majority of their troops in Iberia in to vulnerable spots and destroy their Iberian army before they even get a chance to attack (make sure that your counter attacking troops will end their turn INSIDE the city, though, so that they are not killed in a counterattack the next turn). While doing this, if you have not captured Palma already, this would be a good time to ship some troops over to Palma and capture it. Also note, Carthage will be shipping troops over from Africa as well, so be ready to defend your holdings along the Med. Shore, especially in Sicily (even Palma).

    Hannibal is indeed very strong but you have a good advantage : you know when he spawns and his behavior is highly predictable. When he do spawn in 225, you'll eventually go to war with him. Hannibal, being handled by the AI, will inevitably go and attack the nearest city. The key is simple : garrison that nearest city with nothing but velites. He is, on the attack, simply unstoppable, so there's no point in wasting any other unit. Garrison all your army just outside of said city and out of reach of Hannibal of course. When his turn ends and he has killed 1 or 2 velites, move your army in the city, bombard with everything you've got and, if you have enough ballista and velites, you'll weaken him enough for you to finish him off with a consular army, preferably one with both elite legios. Remember to finish him no matter what because you really don't want him to retreat to Mediolanum and heal back.

    After a while, the troops from Carthaginian Spain will slow to a trickle. Now it’s time for you to invade! Send your troops in and the rest of the Punic land should fall quickly. If you didn’t suffer too many casualties during this invasion, then regroup at Carthago Nova and ship your troops over to Africa and begin your invasion of the Carthaginian homeland. You can (and should for their support is invaluable) recruit the Numidians to your side (military alliance) to keep Carthage busy while you finish them off. Make sure you have an embassy with them to do so. If you did suffer a large number of casualties during the invasion, then sue for peace with Carthage and build up at Carthago Nova or Sicily, according to whether you want to invade Africa from the west (starting at Cartenna) or fearlessly from the East (directly striking Carthage). The latter option if successful will doom Carthage in one strike, but will require a huge army and many risks of defeat.

    Once Carthage has fallen, your largest rival in the western part of the Med. will never again rise to challenge your rule.
     
  16. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    6. Moving East: Macedonian and Greek Wars

    Before any new serious undertaking, spend some time cleaning up the mess left by the Punic Wars. Rebuild your economy, let the population increase in Italy, and see if there are some leftovers to finish. If you had the Numidians go to war with Carthage, they’ll probably be weakened from the war and only have a few Numidian horsemen left (which are still deadly, mind you!). Take advantage of this (and the fact that your army is already in Africa) and conquer them before they cause you any problems in the future. After that, recuperate in Carthago and ship your troops over to Italy and Sicily, inspecting the cities to guesstimate how many troops you will need to conquer the Western Greek colonies still left free. When ready, attack Bovianum as a first priority and capture it, you should also capture all other Greek colonies.

    Now that your Med. islands, Italy, and Africa will likely not come under attack anymore, you can remove most (not all) of your garrisons from the cities there and have them join your main armies. By now, the conscription system must have been reformed by Marius and you should also be able to create new, more effective legions, so upgrade all your normal Legions (at his stage, do not upgrade your Legion armies, they are much too valuable, although you may consider doing so much later in game with you older legion armies, such as the consular ones). Begin gathering your main army over in Illyria, and – while tactfully using military alliances to turn the Greek states (including Macedonia) against each other and weakening each other – systematically conquer all of Greece and Macedonia. Without the full strength of your legions, this may be quite a task. But some of them have another job to do... In the meantime, consider in due time to create a new port, east of Athenae, to control the luxury there, on the island of Delos (although you will need the advance commerce to be able to trade it around!).
     
  17. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    7. Conquest of Iberia UPDATED

    While your conquer Greece and Macedonia in the East, a serious expeditionary corps should be moving West towards Iberia. In a couple of decade, you should be able to run over the harsh country and their barbarian armies, but do not underestimate their vigour. Make sure to station a few troops along your cities that border Iberia to defend against any Iberian invasions. There should be no major challenges during this war, besides dealing with the ruthless landscapes and the lack of roads to access the most remote parts of the country.

    Consider Hispania to be a test for your later game conquests. Dacia, Gaul, Britain, Germania south and north of the Rhine all require you to build roads while you are at war, not after it is finished. You need to be able to use your army to build the roads so that you can outmaneuver some pretty nasty units like picti, miles falcatus, and praedators who can destroy an unsuspecting legio. This means that you need to build tons of velites to fight skirmishing actions while your legio and legio leaders build the roads. Building the roads to connect the cities will also eliminate war weariness issues if the luxuries are coming into the captured cities from day 1 as well as cutting down on political takeovers.

    Basically you should use Hispania to get a good idea of how many legio you need to finish a road quickly whether it be through grasslands, forests or hills. This will insure that your conquests are fast enough to stay ahead or close to the timeline.
     
  18. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    8. Civil unrests and eastern extension: Sulla and Pompey

    By 125 BC, Rome's military and diplomatic successes around the Mediterranean have resulted in new and unaccustomed pressures on the structures of the old city-state. The nearly endless series of wars made it impossible for the army to disband after only a few months to the point where farmers returned home only once every few years. As a result, their fields are now unworked and fallow and many farmers, while out fighting for Rome, ended up losing their lands to debtors, who consolidated them into latifundia. The problem is too acute to ignore it any longer and you must now look into reforming the agrarian law. But many members of the Senate, especially the patricians and old families, now have a serious vested interest in preserving the status quo - to give up any land meant the end of their vast incomes, and the luxuries they were becoming increasingly notorious for indulging in. To complete the Lex Agraria, you will need to go into your first civil war, a stressful and unpleasant experience, as Sulla is taking the reins of the Republic. Most of your cities will loose population, your economy will crash, and development freeze. The bright side is that, once completed, all your current cities will be granted citizenship, helping at reducing corruption, controlling war weariness, and allowing you to develop them into great metropolis.

    In this period of unrest, you might want to complete a disturbing wonder, as Spartacus revolt against Rome. The Servi Defeci will stir slave unrest but this will be counterbalanced by a massive creation of Equites, that very effectively tackle these troubles and that might even assist Pompey in his wars in the East.

    The small Asian nations (Pergamum, Bithynia and Nabatea) can in most cases, if you have the money, be peacefully inherited, allowing concentrating on real enemies such as the Seleucid Greeks and most than all, Pontus. To do so, use propaganda, and be prepared to pay an astronomical price for Pergamum, as it is a real large city, with plenty of riches, and it is likely to have a serious professional army that can assist you later on in the hard wars to come in Pontus and Armenia. It might be however, especially if the great port of Pergamum has been destroyed, that corruption in Asia will be unbearable. That can be only resolved by either building a new great port later on, building the pharus small wonder (if you haven’t done so yet!), or controlling Alexandria and its great port.

    In the meantime, make sure you provide Pompey with exceptional power, and send him and his new fleet to deal with the pirates in the eastern part of the Mediterranean. These fleets and the embarked troops will be very much necessary in the East, and that not only to deal with pirates. The East is ripe for a conquest and a new threat is rising, in the person of Mithridates.

    If the Seleucids are still around, they will have anyway been seriously weakened by their Parthian nemesis. Make sure you use them to wage war against Pontus on your side. As you control Pergamum, you can now build there another Pompey related wonder, which will provide you with great troops directly at the border with Pontus. Make sure you take full advantage of this. Even so, you will find Pontus’ annoying mobile foot troops much stressful, and once Mitrhidates is around (by 80BC), they will be a great threat to even your legion armies. Once you’ve conquered Pergamum, Bithynia, and Nabatea, move on to Pontus and defeat them. Their Armenian troops are very annoying in that they have 2 movement points and can retreat from battle; be prepared for this!

    Once you’ve finished off conquering all of Pontus’ holdings in Asia, sign a peace treaty with them so that their only remaining city is Chersonesus, and maybe a few in Armenia if you wish so, for that region is of little value and can play a buffer between you and the Parthians. You can then set up your troops to conquer all that remain of the Seleucids, likely to be remaining only in Syria, around the great city of Antiochia. If not yet so, inherit Nabatea, for Petra and Jerusalem are rich cities, with an added luxury.
     
  19. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    9. Conquests of the Gauls: Caesar

    Once your armies finish up in Iberia, immediately send them to Massilia to join up with Caesar’s armies that you will likely have created by now, thanks to the wonder you should have built. Some Allied Celtic horsemen (infantry would be useless, make sure to update these) will also shine in the war ahead – war with the Gallic tribes! With 4 to 5 Legion armies and the Allied horsemen, you shouldn’t have too many problems defeating Gallia’s barbarian troops and capturing their cities. Remember than native cavalry move fast through forests while Caesar’s armies ignore not only forests but also hills! Try to recruit additional Gallic Allies as you conquer new cities in Gallia. Once you’ve captured all of Gallia’s holdings in Gaul, rush-build some transports in Gesoriacum and ship your Legion armies over to the Gallia’s holdings in Britannia and complete your conquest of Gallia. Consider pushing ahead with the Veneti tribe in the Western part of Gallia, although these might endanger your troops in Britannia.
     
  20. pinktilapia

    pinktilapia Homeless

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Belgium
    10. Triumvirate, civil wars and the first Emperor

    There has been a triumvirate in Rome, among which Pompey and Caesar were players. Yet competition among these two has become too fierce and civil war is brewing again. As Caesar cross the Rubicon, you will need to go into a civil war government for the second time. This will allow you to build the wonder Dictator Perpetuus, as Caesar win the war, see Pompey dead, meet Cleopatra and takes power. However, before long, he is assassinated. Civil war then continues and troubles begin to stir, as Octavian fights Mark Antony, the latter whom has been seduced by Cleopatra of Egypt and has joined their cause and begun recruiting Legions to Egypt’s side.

    With your Legion armies in Gallia, you still have your main army in Greece. Using your (hopefully) large navy, ship your army over to the East, if it is not yet there, and capture the strongholds of Cleopatra. You’ll likely have quite a few naval battles with Egypt as you did with Carthage to take control of the eastern Med. You may want to split your force (if it is large enough) two ways: one sailing for Cyrene to capture Egypt’s holdings on that side of Egypt and the other sailing for Salamis/Tyrus to begin capturing Egypt’s holding on that side. Eventually, you’re going to have to recombine your force for a push into central Egypt. This part of the invasion will probably be very costly, so be prepared to take some casualties. After a long, bitter fight, you’ll eventually destroy all of Egypt’s Legions and exact your revenge upon Antony and Cleopatra, establishing Roma’s control over Egypt, a very rich province indeed. Octavian, now taking the name of Augustus, is the first Roman Emperor. The Republic has lived.
     

Share This Page