:lol: Quora is not a legal source and the author of that snippet is not an attorney. He seems to have a MSc degree and may be Canadian. Besides, you live in Russia and cannot be extradited for quoting the WSJ. You are quite safe. Putin will protect you.
I don't care who he is, it's your headache to check whether you violated copyright or not. Looks like you already did it, so everything is ok.
 
It is an essential help, problem is that only providing defense is not viable for the long term if we can't do it constantly, this last year has shown it, with Ukraine air defense lack of ammo allowing Russia to provide efficient CAS on the frontline (I think there was a recent video of a pair of Su-25 over the front, I mean really over it, not lobbing rockets or launching glide bomb from kilometers away) or destroy the power grid with cruise missiles.
 
A Chinese view of Russia


Four main factors will influence the course of the war. The first is the level of resistance and national unity shown by Ukrainians, which has until now been extraordinary. The second is international support for Ukraine, which, though recently falling short of the country’s expectations, remains broad.

The third factor is the nature of modern warfare, a contest that turns on a combination of industrial might and command, control, communications and intelligence systems. One reason Russia has struggled in this war is that it is yet to recover from the dramatic deindustrialisation it suffered after the disintegration of the Soviet Union.

The final factor is information. When it comes to decision-making, Vladimir Putin is trapped in an information cocoon, thanks to his having been in power so long. The Russian president and his national-security team lack access to accurate intelligence. The system they operate lacks an efficient mechanism for correcting errors. Their Ukrainian counterparts are more flexible and effective.

In combination, these four factors make Russia’s eventual defeat inevitable. In time it will be forced to withdraw from all occupied Ukrainian territories, including Crimea. Its nuclear capability is no guarantee of success. Didn’t a nuclear-armed America withdraw from Korea, Vietnam and Afghanistan?

Though the war has been hugely costly for Ukraine, the strength and unity of its resistance has shattered the myth that Russia is militarily invincible. Ukraine may yet rise from the ashes. When the war ends, it can look forward to the possibility of joining the European Union and NATO.

Adding to the risks confronting Mr Putin, the war has convinced more and more former Soviet republics that Russia’s imperial ambition threatens their independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity. Increasingly aware that a Russian victory is out of the question, these states are distancing themselves from Moscow in different ways, from forging economic-development policies that are less dependent on Russia to pursuing more balanced foreign policies. As a result, prospects for the Eurasian integration that Russia advocates have dimmed.

The war, meanwhile, has made Europe wake up to the enormous threat that Russia’s military aggression poses to the continent’s security and the international order, bringing post-cold-war EU-Russia detente to an end. Many European countries have given up their illusions about Mr Putin’s Russia.

At the same time, the war has jolted NATO out of what Emmanuel Macron, the French president, called its “brain-dead” state. With most NATO countries increasing their military spending, the alliance’s forward military deployment in eastern Europe has been greatly shored up. The addition of Sweden and Finland to NATO highlights Mr Putin’s inability to use the war to prevent the alliance’s expansion.

The war will also help to reshape the UN Security Council. It has highlighted the body’s inability to effectively assume its responsibility of maintaining world peace and regional security owing to the abuse of veto power by some permanent members. This has riled the international community, increasing the chances that reform of the Security Council will speed up. Germany, Japan, India and other countries are likely to become permanent members and the five current permanent members may lose their veto power. Without reform, the paralysis that has become the hallmark of the Security Council will lead the world to an even more dangerous place.

Since the war began China has conducted two rounds of diplomatic mediation. Success has proved elusive but no one should doubt China’s desire to end this cruel war through negotiations. That wish shows that China and Russia are very different countries. Russia is seeking to subvert the existing international and regional order by means of war, whereas China wants to resolve disputes peacefully.

With Russia still attacking Ukrainian military positions, critical infrastructure and cities, and possibly willing to escalate further, the chances of a Korea-style armistice look remote. In the absence of a fundamental change in Russia’s political system and ideology, the conflict could become frozen. That would only allow Russia to continue to launch new wars after a respite, putting the world in even greater danger.

Feng Yujun is a professor at Peking University.
 
Meanwhile


The US has accused China of providing Russia with cruise missile and drone engines and machine tools for ballistic missiles, as it urges Europe to step up diplomatic and economic pressure on Beijing to stop the sales.In disclosing previously classified intelligence, senior US officials said Chinese and Russian groups were working to jointly produce drones inside Russia. They said China had also supplied 90 per cent of chips imported by Russia last year which were being used to make tanks, missiles and aircraft.The officials added China was also helping Russia to improve its satellite and other space-based capabilities to help prosecute its war in Ukraine, and Beijing was also providing satellite imagery.Dennis Wilder, a former top China military analyst at the CIA, said the disclosure “far exceeds previous estimates and shows a concerted programme by China’s leaders” to help Moscow prosecute the war in Ukraine.
 
"Large military drones made by traditional defense contractors" are easily destroyed by AD sytems. That was decisively demonstrated in the first month of the war, with the failure of the turkish drones against russian AD systems. They are only good for colonial-style wars.
What works, for drones, is using them as discardable, cheap, ammunition. But the US is unable to produce any cheap weapons. Those "traditional defense contractors". The US is incapable of even fighting, let alone winning, any war against a country with modern armed forces and its own industrial base. Denial is all it has left: pretending it hasn't lost its old place as most threatening military. And it only fools its onw population, not the rest of the world.

Want news to prove these points? Look at the other war theather now.
 
I'd say that was decisively demonstrated after the first months of the war, after the monumental failure of the Russian AD systems against Turkish drones was corrected, but the end result is the same: AFAIK those kind of drones are only used in recon now, not attack.

But drones evolve, fast, on both side. I'm afraid we are going to make a huge step in history when the first autonomous IA drones will be used by one side or the other to kill humans.
 
There was no "monumental failure" at all. Russia's military took a tour deep into Ukraine, huge columns or armoured vehicles, and no losses from air attacks. Then they just widrew and shifted into a "let's disarm NATO while we're at it" strategy, orderly, without those columns being inconvenienced by any drone or other air attack.

You persist in believing obviously fake propaganda. With not a shred of evidence, but then faith and evidence were never a pair were they? As for AI, another fairy tale. Its a tool among many for targeting, nothing revolutionary. Cheap drones in themselves are a more significnt new thing, but again not one that changes old strategies. Just one that must be taken into account. This has been an artillery war and missile war, with drones playing a supporting role and wir power hastening the end when it gets used with really big bombs. The kind that can only be used cheaply from old planes.

The one thing western governments are desperate to avoid is recognizing their military impotence and their strategic folly. But things get harded and harder to hide.

Moderator Action: Warned for trolling. The_J
 
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You persist in believing obviously fake propaganda. With not a shred of evidence, but then faith and evidence were never a pair were they?

Some usage of Bayraktar drones during the war:

Attack




Recon


Decoy


During a few months, until, yes, Russia adapted :




As for AI, another fairy tale. Its a took among many for targeting, nothing revolutionary. Cheap drones in themselves are a more significnt new thing, but again not one that changes old strategies. Just one that must be taken into account. This has been an artillery war and missile war, with drones playing a supporting role and wir power hastening the end when it gets used with really big bombs. The kind that can only be used cheaply from old planes.

It's a moral issue if they are used to identify and attack a target without human confirmation, and the Electronic Warfare is pushing this evolution, it will happen.
 
There was no "monumental failure" at all. Russia's military took a tour deep into Ukraine, huge columns or armoured vehicles, and no losses from air attacks. Then they just widrew and shifted into a "let's disarm NATO while we're at it" strategy, orderly, without those columns being inconvenienced by any drone or other air attack.

You persist in believing obviously fake propaganda. With not a shred of evidence, but then faith and evidence were never a pair were they?
That's some comical level of irony and projection here.
 
Things I feel like saying: It is just unacceptable that US aid for Ukraine can't get a vote. What the heck Mike Johnson? I blame Biden here also for refusing to give any domestic ground or concession, instead deciding to try and shift blame for our failures to the Republicans. And of course, he was at fault for making promises he couldn't keep and this whole war was provoked by the US and it's a stain on what is left of our honor that we never keep the promises we make, even the ones we shouldn't have made in the first place.

If Ukraine had the anti-air cover and the artillery munitions the only way the Russians could gain significant ground would be with a tactical nuke assist, which would not happen in this context. Now, I am not saying that this war could be won just by providing weapons. There just doesn't exist the spare Patriots and other systems to cover the huge Ukrainian airspace. But we should have at the least had a vote and made some sort of decision and had someone take responsibility. It's humiliating for us, which of course is nothing compared to what this means to Ukraine.

Whatever Russia gets out of this is likely to be a bellyache at best and a catastrophe at worst. Truely all of this has been a failure of diplomacy on a scale of world wars one and two.
 
this whole war was provoked by the US and it's a stain on what is left of our honor that we never keep the promises we make, even the ones we shouldn't have made in the first place.
You wish...
 
Things I feel like saying: It is just unacceptable that US aid for Ukraine can't get a vote. What the heck Mike Johnson? I blame Biden here also for refusing to give any domestic ground or concession, instead deciding to try and shift blame for our failures to the Republicans. And of course, he was at fault for making promises he couldn't keep and this whole war was provoked by the US and it's a stain on what is left of our honor that we never keep the promises we make, even the ones we shouldn't have made in the first place.

If Ukraine had the anti-air cover and the artillery munitions the only way the Russians could gain significant ground would be with a tactical nuke assist, which would not happen in this context. Now, I am not saying that this war could be won just by providing weapons. There just doesn't exist the spare Patriots and other systems to cover the huge Ukrainian airspace. But we should have at the least had a vote and made some sort of decision and had someone take responsibility. It's humiliating for us, which of course is nothing compared to what this means to Ukraine.

Whatever Russia gets out of this is likely to be a bellyache at best and a catastrophe at worst. Truely all of this has been a failure of diplomacy on a scale of world wars one and two.
Moderator Action: This is a news thread and not a place to pontificate US politics. If you have Ukraine invasion news to relate, please do.
 
After more than 4,000 amendments, the Bill was finally passed. Interesting to see how many will go willingly.

Mobilization bill submitted for presidential signature
Ukraine's bill on mobilization has been submitted to President Volodymyr Zelensky for signature, according to the online portal of Ukraine's parliament, the Verkhovna Rada, on April 16.

The bill was passed in its second reading in parliament on April 11 and was signed by the speaker of the parliament on April 15.

The bill on mobilization is a critical component of the Ukrainian political and military leadership's efforts to update the legal framework around conscription in order to ramp up mobilization in 2024.

After an initial, contentious version of the mobilization bill was withdrawn in January, a new, updated version passed the first reading on Feb. 7. Lawmakers have proposed over 4,000 amendments to the bill since then.

Several key provisions of the earlier draft law were eventually passed by the parliament separately, with President Volodymyr Zelensky signing three laws in early April: on the lowering of the conscription age to 25, the introduction of an electronic register for conscripts, and the canceling of the "partially eligible" status.

The final version of the mobilization bill was approved by the parliament's National Security and Defense Committee on April 9.

Of the provisions remaining in the bill, key points include the right of disabled soldiers and those who have returned from captivity to discharge themselves, and the introduction of mandatory medical commission checks for those who previously held the "partially eligible" status.

Other provisions include penalties for those deemed to be dodging the draft, including the potential revoking of consular services and driver's licenses.

The parliament also voted to remove provisions on demobilization, which previously foresaw soldiers having the right to leave the military after 36 months of service, from the bill so that they could be considered separately.
 
After more than 4,000 amendments, the Bill was finally passed. Interesting to see how many will go willingly.
Unlike Russia, Ukraine is actually suffering from an (illegal) invasion, so "willingness" is hard to measure. If you feel forced to do something because people are taking over your country by force and slaughtering your countryfolk, is that being willing? It's a different kind of unwillingness to say, conscription, but at the end of the day it's wordplay aimed at undermining Ukraine's need to defend itself from imperialistic aggression.
 
Unlike Russia, Ukraine is actually suffering from an (illegal) invasion, so "willingness" is hard to measure. If you feel forced to do something because people are taking over your country by force and slaughtering your countryfolk, is that being willing? It's a different kind of unwillingness to say, conscription, but at the end of the day it's wordplay aimed at undermining Ukraine's need to defend itself from imperialistic aggression.

The early burst of patriotic fervor which saw draft centers swamped with volunteers has evaporated.
An estimated 650,000 men of fighting age have fled their country, most by smuggling themselves across the border.

No wonder some Ukrainians want that $60 billion as soon as possible, and why some Americans are wary of giving it to them.

Ex-defense ministry officials formally accused of embezzlement
Former senior Defense Ministry officials suspected of embezzling funding for military supplies have been formally accused and will appear in court, the State Bureau of Investigation announced on April 17.

The State Bureau of Investigation is a Ukrainian law enforcement agency that primarily deals with pre-trial investigations into high-ranking officials and those in positions of power or authority.

The group of officials, including a former deputy defense minister, is accused of intentionally ordering poor-quality supplies from abroad to embezzle the funds.

The procurement process involved a 100% advance payment and a violation of "the procedure for monitoring the quality of the goods," according to the Bureau.

As a result, Ukrainian soldiers "received low-quality body armor that cannot be used in combat without endangering life," the Bureau said.

"This led not only to the loss of 222 million hryvnias ($5.6 million) of state budget funds, but also to the undermining of the country's defense capabilities, a threat to the lives and health of the personnel of the Armed Forces," the Bureau said.

The former deputy defense minister is specifically accused of lobbying for contracts for supplies like ammunition, bulletproof vests, helmets, and clothes at "inflated prices and of low quality."

The corruption scheme amounted to a total value of over Hr 1.4 billion ($35 million), the Bureau said.

The officials are suspected not only of embezzlement, but also of obstructing the activities of the Armed Forces. If convicted, they can face up to 15 years in prison.
 
"Diplomacy", Ukrainian style...
“Give us the damn Patriots,” snapped Kuleba, Ukraine’s chief diplomat.

Obliterate and advance (or not) seems to be the MO atm.
Kharkiv at risk of becoming 'second Aleppo,' mayor says
At the end of March, Russia destroyed all the electrical substations in Kharkiv, leaving Ukraine's second-largest city without a stable power supply.

While Kharkiv is at particular risk because of its proximity to Russia, lying less than 30 kilometers from the border, stocks of air defense are low across Ukraine.
 
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