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Russian language questions

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by NovaKart, Oct 27, 2010.

  1. NovaKart

    NovaKart شێری گەورە

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    I started studying Russian again since I'm in Baku and I have some questions. Hope that anyone else studying or wanting to comment can use the thread too.

    First of all - apparently there's 3 different words for jacket -

    жакет, пиджак, куртка. What's the difference?

    Does кроссовки mean tennis shoes and туфли mean dress shoes?

    If you want to use the genitive case like Anna's house, Mikheil's house you say дом Анны , дом михаила right? But what if there's a female name that doesn't end in A or a male name that ends in A, such as a foreign name? What's the rule then?

    Any advice?

    Thanks
     
  2. Yeekim

    Yeekim Chieftain

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    AFAIK, the first would be e.g. upper part of a female business suit, second is the same for men and the third is something you would wear when you go to skiing.
    Yes, jogging shoes vs slippers.
     
  3. madviking

    madviking north american scum

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    generic, blazer, winter jacket

    generic/sneakers, sandals

    I'm pretty awful with grammar but I'm pretty sure that male names which end in 'a' (e.g. Sasha) retain the 'a'; "Дом Саша", but I have no idea about 'a' less female names.
     
  4. NovaKart

    NovaKart شێری گەورە

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    I see, so курорт is something you could wear on a cold day but the others are part of a business suit?

    And what about туфли? Are they just something you wear formally or at home? I thought тапочки were slippers like for home use.
     
  5. NovaKart

    NovaKart شێری گەورە

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    So what is the name for sandals/slippers, sneakers and ordinary shoes and dress shoes?
     
  6. red_elk

    red_elk Warlord

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    Пиджак - usually part of formal business suit, male or female.
    Жакет - short female variant.
    Куртка - casual clothing (http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Файл:Safari-Jacket.JPG)

    Rather sport shoes.

    Yes, exactly.

    Jane's house = Дом Джейн.
    Joshua's house = Дом Джошуа.
    Name should not be changed here.
     
  7. red_elk

    red_elk Warlord

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    Yes, if you mean "куртка".
    "Курорт" means resort.

    Ordinary shoes - ботинки.
    Dress shoes - туфли.
    Sandals - сандалии.
    Slippers - тапки / тапочки.
     
  8. Neonanocyborgasm

    Neonanocyborgasm Chieftain

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    "куртка" is more of a coat. "пиджак" means blazer.

    "туфли" are just shoes of any kind. I've never heard the first one.

    Then you use the genitive case of that name, or you turn the name into an adjective (Анненый дом). Foreign words are not declinable, so they are always the same regardless of their sense. Some Russians will try to decline them anyway, based on what they might be if they were Russian words.
     
  9. red_elk

    red_elk Warlord

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    This is not fully correct.
    Something like this is possible with another names, for example "Anya" (diminutive form of Anna)
    "Anya's house" - "Дом Ани" or "Анин дом".
    But not "Анненый" for sure, there is no such word in Russian.
     
  10. Neonanocyborgasm

    Neonanocyborgasm Chieftain

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    Maybe I'm spelling it wrong.
     
  11. NovaKart

    NovaKart شێری گەورە

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    Thanks, that clears up some questions. I know курорт means resort but I was kind of out of it when I posted that.
     
  12. Yeekim

    Yeekim Chieftain

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    Isn't that just about any type of footwear, including tankboots etc?
    Maybe обувь?
     
  13. red_elk

    red_elk Warlord

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    Any type of footwear is "обувь".
    "ботинки" = shoes, (short footwear, not boots).
    Boots in general are better to translate as "сапоги", but tanker boots are often being translated as "армейские ботинки" (military shoes).
     
  14. Virote_Considon

    Virote_Considon The Great Dictator

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    Russian is just Polish if it wasn't spoken by ducks.
    Seriously, I may decide to learn Russian soon, this thread may be useful!
     
  15. NovaKart

    NovaKart شێری گەورە

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    Ok I have another question, what's the difference between лежать and стоять. I've seen them both used the same way, like где лежат ваши тетради? Где стоят цветы? Can they be used interchangably? What about находиться?
     
  16. red_elk

    red_elk Warlord

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    Лежать = to lie (something or somebody is placed horizontally)
    Стоять = to stand (something placed vertically)
    Находиться = to be located

    For example,
    "цветы стоят в вазе" (flowers stand in a bowl)
    "цветы лежат на столе" (flowers lie on the table)
    "цветы находятся в моей комнате" (flowers are located in my room)
     
  17. NovaKart

    NovaKart شێری گەورە

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    Ok that makes sense, to translate лежать directly to lie sounds a bit strange sometimes in English but I'll try to get used to it.

    Are there any Russian movies you would recommend?
     
  18. red_elk

    red_elk Warlord

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    Just in case, I might misspell some English sentences in this topic, but I'm pretty sure that my Russian phrases here are written correctly.

    Well, it depends on what kind of movies you like. In general, there are some very good classic Soviet movies, just a few examples:

    Comedies:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Diamond_Arm
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kidnapping,_Caucasian_Style

    War movies:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dawns_Here_Are_Quiet
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cranes_Are_Flying

    TV series:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventeen_Moments_of_Spring
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Adventures_of_Sherlock_Holmes_and_Dr._Watson

    From modern Russian movies, "Piter FM" and "We are from the future" (first part, not sequel) are not bad.
     
  19. NovaKart

    NovaKart شێری گەورە

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    I'm sure your sentences are right, I'm just saying that to say lie like the flowers lie on the table sounds more poetic or literary than real everyday English but that's English, not Russian.

    I'll check those out. It would be good to practice Russian listening more. True I hear Russian almost as much as Azeri nowadays but to really be in the mindset for listening would make a difference. The only thing I usually see on TV here is Azeri variety shows, Turkish music videos and Turkish TV series all of which are awful except for some of the music videos. They do have Azeri talk shows, sort of a more mild version of Jerry Springer which is sort of interesting although I can't understand most of it.
     
  20. Yeekim

    Yeekim Chieftain

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