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Soapbox:Time we stop acting like an asshat of a species before we go out like dinos

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by hobbsyoyo, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. warpus

    warpus In pork I trust

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    Would still suck if one of those hit a densly populated area.. which would be highly unlikely, but..
     
  2. hobbsyoyo

    hobbsyoyo Deity

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    What about when they land in the ocean which makes up 70% of the Earth's surface and set off a tsunami that wipes out multiple 'small European countries'.

    And we've had two in 100 years of this scale hit the Earth and got extremely luckly that they didn't hit a city. So we should just deal with the possibility of one-two strikes every century and hope our luck continues?
     
  3. Flying Pig

    Flying Pig Utrinque Paratus

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    How lucky? What proportion of the Earth's landmass is urbanised?
     
  4. hobbsyoyo

    hobbsyoyo Deity

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    Ok, I will rephrase:
    We got extremely lucky that neither caused serious loss of life or property besides what Tunguska did to the ecosystem of Siberia.
     
  5. Valka D'Ur

    Valka D'Ur Hosting Iron Pen in A&E Retired Moderator

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    I am extremely skeptical of any reboot/remake. For example, it took YEARS for me to warm up to the Leonardo DiCaprio version of "Man in the Iron Mask" since the one I was familiar with starred Richard Chamberlain and I loved all his swashbuckling/adventure movies/TV series.

    Cosmos is an even harder sell for me. Carl Sagan had a profound effect on my life - how I view the Universe and my place within it, and made it possible for me to reconcile being both an atheist and a spiritual person. I used to believe in astrology, and Sagan's explanations of how nonsensical it is cured me of that particular affliction. I've become an adherent of "extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence."

    Even the movie version of his novel Contact had an impact on my personal life - it came out around the time that my grandmother died. I was devastated, since she'd raised me from childhood, and I hadn't been able to carry out her last wishes. In some ways, I felt very much like young Ellie in the movie when her father died. Religious platitudes just didn't help, and neither did people pushing me to do what was "acceptable".

    It's a very personal thing for me, not just another documentary series.
     
  6. SS-18 ICBM

    SS-18 ICBM Oscillator

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    Other than the flybys of the outer solar system, I'm not sure the Voyager and Pioneer missions have had much scientific value. They didn't even encounter any Oort cloud objects on the way.
     
  7. dutchfire

    dutchfire Deity

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    Although I dislike Amsterdam in general, I would of course prefer it not to get hit by a meteorite (especially since the collateral damage in other cities would be too big :p), but I wouldn't call in an unsurmountable loss for humanity.

    I think that'd be quite okay, since tsunami's are relatively slow, so at least you can evacuate people to high buildings. Tsunami's also only hit the 5km closest to the sea, most of the time, so most people would be okay.
     
  8. Valka D'Ur

    Valka D'Ur Hosting Iron Pen in A&E Retired Moderator

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    Well, shame on them! They should be hunted down and rendered for their constituent atoms for not knowing where the interesting Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud objects were many years before those were discovered! :rolleyes:
     
  9. SS-18 ICBM

    SS-18 ICBM Oscillator

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    Right, I'm having a bit of trouble here guys. Can you good people of CFC comb my previous post and see where I advocated what Valka was saying? It would be a great help, thanks.
     
  10. ace99

    ace99 Deity

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    I think this could be it but I'm not sure:

    :p
     
  11. Valka D'Ur

    Valka D'Ur Hosting Iron Pen in A&E Retired Moderator

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    Or you could just ask Valka herself... :huh:

    You denigrated one of the finest astronomical endeavors this species has ever accomplished. Sure, it's peanuts compared to Star Trek... but this is Real Life.

    BTW, I looked up your birthdate in your profile, and am curious to know what year you were born. The reason is that if you were born well after the Voyager/Pioneer missions started returning data, you have No. Clue. Whatsoever. what a sense of awe this inspired in those of us who were following the news of their journeys at the time. Who cares if they didn't bump into anything in the Oort Cloud? What they discovered about Jupiter and Saturn were amazing and all by themselves were worth the time, effort, and resources expended.

    As an additional suggestion, I recommend reading Murmurs of Earth by Carl Sagan et al. It's the account of how the Voyager record was produced. It's really inspiring.
     
  12. SS-18 ICBM

    SS-18 ICBM Oscillator

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    Okay, then please point out where I said the missions had absolutely no scientific value. Having studied the data from them regarding the gas giants in my astronomy class was quite enlightening about the origins of the solar system (and all planetary systems in general), I can assure you. Speaking of which, I'm looking forward to the results of the New Horizons mission. It should be followed up with further exploration of other trans-Neptunian objects.
     
  13. PlutonianEmpire

    PlutonianEmpire Socially Awkward Goofball

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    I'm looking forward to NH's arrival at Pluto too. I can't wait to use a more accurate source map for my Terraformed Pluto addon for Celestia. :D
     
  14. LamaGT

    LamaGT Emperor

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    Yeah I'm looking forward too, finally we'll see Pluto's real surface:D
     
  15. hobbsyoyo

    hobbsyoyo Deity

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    Replace the word 'no' with 'not much' and that's pretty much what you said:

    And as Valka said, it's a bit odd to blame the probes for not encountering things not known to exist when it is very hard (and even more so in the 60's and 70's without modern computers) to pass things you do know exist in outer space.

    And your caveat, 'other than flybys...' makes the rest of your comment a bit nonsensical. You're basically saying that probes to hunt for asteroids would have no scientific value because previous probes (in your opinion) did no science outside of their primary goals. I don't see how one follows the other or even that your assessment of the Voyager and other probes is true. For one thing, they are still returnind data on the heliopause and that's a rather big deal as the only other way to get that data would be to send another probe and wait ~30 years for it to arrive.
     
  16. SS-18 ICBM

    SS-18 ICBM Oscillator

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    I don't see why you think discerning the origin of the solar system is not worth much in astronomy.

    I suppose that's true. But the point remains that the Voyager probes had concrete and measurable primary goals.
     
  17. hobbsyoyo

    hobbsyoyo Deity

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    What?

    They did, but what does that have to do with anything? You said they didn't do any science outside their primary goals. I said that's not true and irrelevant to the point I made about future probes. I am sorry but I do not understand what you meant with this entire post.
     
  18. SS-18 ICBM

    SS-18 ICBM Oscillator

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    You know what, you're right. I have no idea where I'm going with these posts. I don't even know what I was thinking.
     
  19. hobbsyoyo

    hobbsyoyo Deity

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    :)

    You are a cool dude.
     

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