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Spontaneous Employee Resignations

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Vancouver 2010, Jul 9, 2004.

  1. Vancouver 2010

    Vancouver 2010 Getting Paid to Code

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    This is a part-venting, part-sharing-stories thread.

    First, the vent: Due to an employee at my workplace quitting her job today (with absolutely no notice), I now have to give up my day off tomorrow, along with the plans I had with my friends, to take over her shift. Better yet, she has only been an employee for two weeks, meaning the manager has spent the last two weeks training her for nothing.

    And now, the sharing stories part: Do any of you have stories along these lines?
     
  2. Bamspeedy

    Bamspeedy We'll dig up the road!

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    At my job we've had people go through the week-long orientation (mostly in a classroom), but when they get into the actual warehouse to start working, they leave after 2 hours on the first day.

    It used to be if we hired 5 people, 2 would quit the first day, 2 more within a couple weeks, and you might get 1 to actually stick around longer than a month and keep the job.
     
  3. FearlessLeader2

    FearlessLeader2 Fundamentalist Loon

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    If employers had to give equal notice to their employees before firing them or laying them off, I would feel sympathetic. Two weeks notice is a flaming crock of crap, no employer on earth will EVER tell an employee he's getting fired in two weeks.
     
  4. Bamspeedy

    Bamspeedy We'll dig up the road!

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    Laid off and fired are 2 different things from my perspective.

    Most places I worked at gave us 1-2 week notice if we were getting laid off (that's when they 'officially' give you the notice, but you know/feel it's coming a month or so before then). But, no I would never expect them to give someone any notice before being fired. The employee usually did something bad in order to be fired. But, I guess there is some companies that try to blend fired/laid off together (they say you are 'laid off', but they never intend to call you back to work).
     
  5. Grisu

    Grisu Draghetto Retired Moderator

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    you're wrong. here it's generally a month notice if you want to fire someone, the same if you want to quit. if you're a long term employee it can be even longer (with my last job, it was 3 months), but the minimum after the "trial period" is a month by law.

    Personally I think it benefits employer and employee alike. both have enough time to look for someone/something new.

    edit: bamspeedy is right: this only applies if you're laid of. If you break the law, or an agreement you signed on entry, or if you repeatedly don't show up for work etc, this notice-time of course doesn't apply.
     
  6. Flak

    Flak vBülletin Förum

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    KaeptnOvi, In Switzerland you're probably right. But in the U.S. there is no obligation by an employee or employer to let the other know that they are no longer going to be working.

    BTW, In Austria it's 3 months notice! And if they want you to leave earlier, they still have to pay you for that 3 months. Incredible.
     
  7. Iggy

    Iggy Deity

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    Sometimes both employers and employees forget their responsibilities and do not care if their actions affect others. The fair system would be for both employer and employee to be legally obliged to give the same amount of notice. After a trail period this could be a minimum of 1 month or longer if mutually agreed.
    I may be wrong here, but in the UK I think the law is that an employer must give 1 weeks notice per year of service (a minimum of 1 week and a maximum of 12 weeks).
     
  8. Akka

    Akka Moody old mage.

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    Don't know for the US, but here, when someone is recruited, there is a (usually one month) "trying period" when the employee and the employer can stop the contract at any moment without any compensation or warning.
     
  9. Grisu

    Grisu Draghetto Retired Moderator

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    yes I thought so, but since FL said "no employer on earth will EVER..." I had a moral obligation to prove him wrong :p
     
  10. IglooDude

    IglooDude Enforcing Rule 34 Retired Moderator Supporter

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    Same in the US - I don't think it is prescribed by law, but most places I've worked put a 1-3 month probationary period into the employment contract, no-notice termination of the contract by either side.
     
  11. marioh

    marioh Observer

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    When I was younger, I was a frequent "spontaneous quitter". I'd just quit jobs out of the blue, and quite frankly, if the jobs payed a respectable wage, maybe I'd give some notice.
    My favorite quitting episode was when I waited for the boss to make a pickup, then wrote on a piece of paper "I QUIT" about a hundred times on both the front and back, and signed my name to it. I put it on his desk in his office, and walked out. Since I had friends that also worked there, I was able to find out the bosses reaction when he returned, which was a mixture of bafflement and outrage. ;)
     
  12. eyrei

    eyrei Deity Retired Moderator

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    Many states in the US have no restrictions on firing and quitting. The employer or employee may terminate the relationship at any time without notice. I think its a load of crap, but that is the way it is...of course, I'm not exactly a capitalist...
     
  13. Vancouver 2010

    Vancouver 2010 Getting Paid to Code

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    Vent Update:

    When this girl was hired, the manager hired another person as well. Well now this person has also quit! This time it was because he found a (supposedly) better job elsewhere. I think he's giving 2 weeks notice though.

    My boss is going to be furious tomorrow when he finds out he's spent the last two weeks training these people just to find out he's wasted his time... :rolleyes:
     
  14. Sanaz

    Sanaz Gorilla Joe

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    It pays to spend the extra time and hire the right people. Best is incentive programs when one employee gets their friend to work, and receives a nice bonus when they stay for 6 months. Things like that. Bad hiring is a fast way to ruin in a company, it's why the best companies also usually have great employee relations. I say blame the boss, not the people he hired. They're already gone and not thinking about their old job, the boss is still there ready to cause trouble another day.
     
  15. ainwood

    ainwood Consultant. Administrator

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    New Zealand has gone a bit far the other way, unfortunately. You are not allowed to fire any employees without going through lots of legal hurdles first. If you don't follow the protocol exactly, then you (as an employer) can be sued for compensation.

    A recent example was where a group of fishermen on a company trip were staying at a hotel of the parent company. They wen't on a drinking binge, culminating in urinating off the balcony of the hotel onto the hotel manager below. The manager informed the company CEO who fired them on the spot. The company was then sued for damages.

    Fortunately, the presiding Judge dismissed it, but he went against the actual wording of the law to do it.
     
  16. RedWolf

    RedWolf Deity

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    Maybe the boss shoul investigate the conditions of mployment in his company - working conditions, benefit packages, compensation etc.

    Another part of the problemis that MANY employers when they hire you need/demand you to start RIGHT away... so you're left with the choice of taking the job and starting NOW or not getting the job. When the new job is better for you (in regards to the things I mentioned above) you take it because you have to look out for yourself - nobody else will.

    It's a viscious cycle really - an employer can be one of those places that demands their new hires start right away - but then get outraged when THEIR employees quit without notice.

    I once quit a part-time minimum wage job that paid $6.85 per hour for a full time summer job that paid $13 an hour. I could have given 2 weeks notice but it would have cost me $800. So I finished my last shift and said "oh by the way - I won't be back next week". I could have given them a few more days notice but that manager was notorious for treating employees like garbage once you told her you were quitting... so I avoided that bad scene. :)
     

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