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Superheroes!

I made it about halfway through X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009). :sleep:
 
I made it about halfway through X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009). :sleep:
You made it farther than me... I've only been able to watch that movie one or two scenes at a time... never all the way through at one sitting. I think I've basically seen the entire movie at this point, or at least... I've got the gist... No interest in trying to watch the whole thing in one sitting. As an aside, I didn't like the conclusion/climax of the movie at all... it was generally too absurd... even for a superhero movie, not to mention the whole premise of it was awkward and off-putting.

Putting aside the mediocrity of the movie... Wolverine is much more interesting as a character with his backstory being shrouded in mystery. It's one of the most compelling things about him... how tortured and enigmatic he is. All the backstory they've explicitly shown us just kinda spoils it. The best way to show Wolverine's backstory is through cameos, flashbacks and passing references/innuendo... putting the audience in a similar headspace to where Wolverine is... only partially/vaguely aware of his background with lots of empty spaces and unanswered questions.
 
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You made it farther than me... I've only been able to watch that movie one or two scenes at a time... never all the way through at one sitting. I think I've basically seen the entire movie at this point, or at least... I've got the gist... No interest in trying to watch the whole thing in one sitting. As an aside, I didn't like the conclusion/climax of the movie at all... it was generally too absurd... even for a superhero movie, not to mention the whole premise of it was awkward and off-putting.

Putting aside the mediocrity of the movie... Wolverine is much more interesting as a character with his backstory being shrouded in mystery. It's one of the most compelling things about him... how tortured and enigmatic he is. All the backstory they've explicitly shown us just kinda spoils it. The best way to show Wolverine's backstory is through cameos, flashbacks and passing references/innuendo... putting the audience in a similar headspace to where Wolverine is... only partially/vaguely aware of his background with lots of empty spaces and unanswered questions.
The problem is, in movies, today, in general, everyone has to spill a Dr. Phil story...
 
OK so #1 I can't believe this somehow got 3 moves.

But #2, as I recall in the mid/end credits of Spiderman No Way Home, Eddy Brock/Venom was in the MCU-verse. And Chiwetel Eijofor is in this movie as a military dude, yet he also plays Mordo in the MCU. So either they just totally ignored the end credits scene or they somehow get Eddy back to his verse immediately. Or I guess Mordo could be moonlighting in the military which would be the weirdest character arc ever. Either way the whole point of having a cinematic universe is that it's all connected but ignoring/undoing the consequences of other films goes against that. It just feels messy.

Edit: Ignore my misinformed ramblings

 
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OK so #1 I can't believe this somehow got 3 moves.

But #2, as I recall in the mid/end credits of Spiderman No Way Home, Eddy Brock/Venom was in the MCU-verse. And Chiwetel Eijofor is in this movie as a military dude, yet he also plays Mordo in the MCU. So either they just totally ignored the end credits scene or they somehow get Eddy back to his verse immediately. Or I guess Mordo could be moonlighting in the military which would be the weirdest character arc ever. Either way the whole point of having a cinematic universe is that it's all connected but ignoring/undoing the consequences of other films goes against that. It just feels messy.
You forgot the second half of the end credits scene, where Eddy and Venom get sent back to their universe. A piece of Venom gets left behind, but nothing will be done with that, I'm betting.
 

Welcome to Gotham City, where the corrupt outnumber the good, criminals run rampant and law-abiding citizens live in a constant state of fear. Forged in the fire of tragedy, wealthy socialite Bruce Wayne becomes something both more and less than human—The Batman. His one-man crusade for justice attracts unexpected allies within the GCPD and City Hall, but his heroic actions spawn deadly, unforeseen ramifications.The series is a reimagining of the Batman mythology through the visionary lens of executive producers J.J. Abrams, Matt Reeves and Bruce Timm.
“We didn't have the same kind of limitations that we had back in the '90s where it was made specifically for a children's audience and we had to worry about making sure that would sell a certain number of toys."
- Bruce Timm
 
Is that The Shadow in the Caped Crusader trailer? That would be a fun little tip of the cap, even if it's not literally him. The whole trailer has kind of a "young Batman" thing going. I don't think it's an(other) adaptation of Batman: Year One, but something close to that. There was an animated movie of the 1987 comic in 2011, but I haven't seen it.
 
I'm currently about 2/3 of the way through the old Animated Series (on Netflix.de), and that one already went to some pretty dark places, even if it was only ... you know ... for kids.
 
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CC influenced by BTA series and 1940s Batman comics and also set in that era, but not a remake -

Ah yes... midcentury modern Batman...

Prime Video’s Batman: Caped Crusader may not exactly be set in the same continuity as Batman: The Animated Series, but if the first trailer is anything to judge by, it’s definitely set in the same nebulous time period.

The character designs might look different, but all the computers are the size of a room, all the TVs are black and white, all the cars have huge fenders, and all the gangsters have Tommy guns. Also, Alfred is distinctively pudgy, something he hasn’t been in the comics since the svelte Alan Napier was cast in the role for the 1966 Batman TV show.

Timm and Tuck -

Batman: Caped Crusader first look reveals Asian American Harley Quinn and ‘really weird’ Dark Knight​


Caped Crusader is set in the '40s, at the beginning of Batman's vigilante career, and no one knows what to make of him.

Batman has been around for more than 80 years now, and in that time, Bob Kane and Bill Finger’s dark vigilante has been the subject of countless comic books, cartoons, and movies. Given the variety of interpretations, it’s hard to say that any of them are “definitive,” but Batman: The Animated Series comes close. The 1992-1995 TV show spawned a whole universe of DC superhero cartoons, introduced the world to Harley Quinn, and remains beloved by fans. So no one is better equipped to create a new Batman cartoon than B:TAS co-creator Bruce Timm — but he wanted to do things very differently this time.



Batman: Caped Crusader was first announced as an HBO Max series in 2021, and then was saved by Amazon Prime Video after Max eventually passed on the project. It is now set to debut later this year. In a new interview with Entertainment Weekly, Timm and character designer James Tucker say that the number one priority of Batman: Caped Crusader was making sure it wasn’t just a repeat of B:TAS. The best way to do that, they decided, was to make the new show fully a ‘40s-set period piece, rather than repeating the anachronistic jumble of computers and pay phones that defined B:TAS.
“James and I are both really big fans of movies from that era, so we decided to really lean into that in terms of the clothes, the cars, the architecture, and the level of technology,” Timm says of the new show’s setting. “Early on, we decided there would be no computers and no cell phones. That changed everything.”

In addition to using ‘40s noir films as a reference point, Timm and Tucker also have the actual Batman comics from that era (which featured the first appearances of characters like Catwoman and Clayface) to draw on for inspiration. But there are also elements of Caped Crusader that no Batman fans have seen before.

Harley Quinn, in particular, looks much different than any of her previous appearances, including her origin in B:TAS. The new show characterizes her as Asian American and also separates her from her longtime partner in crime.


Whether in her solo animated series or in the upcoming live-action film Joker: Folie a Deux, Harley Quinn (a.k.a. Dr. Harleen Quinzel) is still typically defined by her relationship with the Clown Prince of Crime. Timm wanted to change that.



“I co-created the character, so I have a lot of love and affection for her, but I thought there might be something interesting about bringing her on the show, just not as Joker’s girlfriend,” Timm says. “So how do we do that? A big part was just doing a basic flip. The original Dr. Quinzel was a little bit more serious, and then when she became Harley, she got really goofy and weird. So we thought, what if we reverse that? When she's Dr. Quinzel, she's a little bit more whimsical and fun, and then when she's Harley Quinn, she's scary.”

The two halves of Harley’s personality are also more connected in Caped Crusader. Instead of abandoning her day job after becoming a jester-themed supervillain, this version of Harley uses psychiatry as a weapon, Timm teases.
Rather than catering to the Joker and other criminally insane residents of Arkham Asylum, the Dr. Quinzel of Caped Crusader is a normal Gotham City psychiatrist. In fact, she gets assigned to treat none other than Bruce Wayne himself.



In doing so, she gets to experience firsthand the stranger version of Batman that Timm and Tucker wanted to explore. It’s not just the costume (which harkens back to the distinct short gloves, tall boots, and heightened ears of ‘40s comics rather than the sleek modern Batsuit) that's differnt, but the psychology as well.
“He's a really weird human being,” Timm says of Batman. “He's not obsessed with his parents' murder, but it changed him in a way where he’s still not adjusted to being a human being. He's literally Batman; inside, that's who he is. Whenever he's Bruce Wayne, that's not just him with a mask off, that's him wearing a person suit. He's trying to pretend to be something that he's not.”
Tucker adds, “The idea was to keep him so removed that no one knows who he is, and no one knows what he's about. We try to wipe out the foregone conclusion that he's a hero, whether it’s for the police, regular citizens of Gotham, or the viewers.”



Clayface and Catwoman also get makeovers in Caped Crusader. Or more accurately, they're back to their original comic book looks.
"We didn't want to do the B:TAS Catwoman or the version that Ed Brubaker and Darwyn Cooke did in the early 2000s with the practical leather jumpsuit, which has become her default look in the comics and movies," Timm says. "That's great, I love that, but we wanted to do something different. So we thought, well, let's go all the way back to the beginning. I love the original look that she had in the '40s. It's purple!"



Tucker cites Barbara Stanwyck's performance as the title character in The Lady Eve as an inspiration for Caped Crusader's Catwoman. This Selina Kyle is playful and charming, though Batman (and viewers) underestimate her at their peril.
"That episode is very fun, but it also has moments that are really serious and dark," Timm says of Catwoman's appearance on the show. "It's the juxtaposition of those two things that make that episode really cool."



Clayface got a similar retro treatment. Don't expect the shapeshifting mud monster of B:TAS (or the Harley Quinn animated series, for that matter). Instead, Caped Crusader draws on the character's original comic book appearance, inspired by classic horror movies.

Batman: Caped Crusader premieres Thursday, August 1, on Prime Video
 
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This part

He's literally Batman; inside, that's who he is. Whenever he's Bruce Wayne, that's not just him with a mask off, that's him wearing a person suit.
sounds promising.
 
If you told me only that there was going to be a show with Kathryn Hahn and Aubrey Plaza, I'd be interested. If you told me that show was going to be about witches, I'd be intrigued. That it's an MCU series actually makes me less interested. Oh, Disney, what have you done? I mean, sure, I'm going to give it a shot, but I'm at the point where the Marvel logo has become a negative. What are the odds that this will be as exciting and creative and crazy as a series about witches, starring Hahn and Plaza, would be if it was produced by, say, Netflix or Apple? Or Disney's sibling, FX? What if I told you A24 was producing a movie about witches starring Hahn and Plaza? You'd think it has to be the most bat[stink] thing ever. The Disney-Marvel brand has become a curse, pun intended.



Think about these:

Coming soon on Paramount+: In this action-packed techno-thriller, a former USAF 'Pararescueman' teams up with a former black ops assassin who officially doesn't exist, and they go after a covert terrorist cell bent on releasing a biological agent. Along the way, they run up against two US Army Special Forces soldiers who are pursuing the same terrorists. Possibly by Taylor Sheridan, his follow-up to Special Ops: Lioness. Or maybe Christopher McQuarrie wants to take a stab at a series (he directed the last 3 Mission: Impossible movies). That was The Falcon & The Winter Soldier.

Coming soon on FX: A paranoid spy-thriller about a retired senior CIA officer who's contacted by an old friend from a European agency, who believes the world's major governments are being systematically infiltrated by enemies unknown. It's The Old Man-meets-Smiley's People. Secret Invasion.

Coming soon to AMC+: A supernatural action-horror series about a mousy museum employee who finds that he's been chosen by an Ancient Egyptian god of the night to battle the leader of a cult who plans to "pass judgment" on the entire human race. Maybe it's part of the Anne Rice universe that AMC is building, with Interview With the Vampire; The Mayfair Witches; and the upcoming The Talamasca. Moon Knight

All three of those should've been great, and none of them were. Thanks, Marvel.
 
It doesn't look spectacular, but I'm certainly eager to see Joe Locke in another role after Heartstopper.
 
It doesn't look spectacular, but I'm certainly eager to see Joe Locke in another role after Heartstopper.
I never read Young Avengers, but it sure seems like they're laying the groundwork for it, even though it hasn't been officially announced.
 
If you told me only that there was going to be a show with Kathryn Hahn and Aubrey Plaza, I'd be interested. If you told me that show was going to be about witches, I'd be intrigued. That it's an MCU series actually makes me less interested. Oh, Disney, what have you done? I mean, sure, I'm going to give it a shot, but I'm at the point where the Marvel logo has become a negative. What are the odds that this will be as exciting and creative and crazy as a series about witches, starring Hahn and Plaza, would be if it was produced by, say, Netflix or Apple? Or Disney's sibling, FX? What if I told you A24 was producing a movie about witches starring Hahn and Plaza? You'd think it has to be the most bat[stink] thing ever. The Disney-Marvel brand has become a curse, pun intended.



Think about these:

Coming soon on Paramount+: In this action-packed techno-thriller, a former USAF 'Pararescueman' teams up with a former black ops assassin who officially doesn't exist, and they go after a covert terrorist cell bent on releasing a biological agent. Along the way, they run up against two US Army Special Forces soldiers who are pursuing the same terrorists. Possibly by Taylor Sheridan, his follow-up to Special Ops: Lioness. Or maybe Christopher McQuarrie wants to take a stab at a series (he directed the last 3 Mission: Impossible movies). That was The Falcon & The Winter Soldier.

Coming soon on FX: A paranoid spy-thriller about a retired senior CIA officer who's contacted by an old friend from a European agency, who believes the world's major governments are being systematically infiltrated by enemies unknown. It's The Old Man-meets-Smiley's People. Secret Invasion.

Coming soon to AMC+: A supernatural action-horror series about a mousy museum employee who finds that he's been chosen by an Ancient Egyptian god of the night to battle the leader of a cult who plans to "pass judgment" on the entire human race. Maybe it's part of the Anne Rice universe that AMC is building, with Interview With the Vampire; The Mayfair Witches; and the upcoming The Talamasca. Moon Knight

All three of those should've been great, and none of them were. Thanks, Marvel.
I'll disagree on some of this. Falcon & The Winter Soldier was excellent... Secret Invasion was also pretty good, not as good as it could have/should have been, but I found it very enjoyable. The ending sucked, specifically the final boss fight, which was regrettable, but the rest of the show was very entertaining. I never cared to finish Moon Knight, so I guess I agree with you on that... it just never captured my interest enough for me to keep watching.
 
I can't possibly be the first person to think of this, but while watching The Acolyte, an image kept popping into my head:

Spoiler :
 
I just saw that the Spider-Verse spinoff series featuring Spider-Man Noir is going to be live-action, not animated, and Nicolas Cage will be the star. That's intriguing. I'm trying to think if there's ever been a modern noir film or series that had kind of a comic-book vibe. Most of the ones I can think of that are close are from the '90s: Dark City, Se7en, and The Crow, which actually was based on a comic. The only series I can think of that was even close is Agent Carter, which wasn't really noir, but it was set in the '40s.

I wondered whether the Spider-Man Noir character would be accompanied by 1930s-style interpretations of all of the classic Spider-Man characters, and indeed, they've cast someone for the part of Robbie Robertson. No mention yet of a Norman Osborn or a Mary-Jane Watson. Also, Spider-Man Noir is a middle-aged man, instead of a teenager or a young man, so it's hard to imagine that older characters like Aunt May or J. Jonah Jameson would still be around. They've cast Brendan Gleeson as somebody, but they haven't revealed who he's playing.
 
Dick Tracy, maybe? Kind of.
I didn't see it. Was that noir, or was that more like Agent Carter, set in a comic-book version of the '40s? The Shadow and Darkman each had some noir elements, and were clearly comic-book-style movies, even if they weren't based on comics, per se. Somebody also did a movie of The Spirit, but I haven't seen it. I heard it's terrible.
 
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