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The 10 Commandments of Civ 6 (yeah. We're going there.)

Discussion in 'Civ6 - Strategy & Tips' started by knighterrant81, Jun 17, 2020.

  1. knighterrant81

    knighterrant81 Warlord

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    Ok, there's more than 10. I cheated. Don't tell Cecil DeMille.

    With the additional releases and/or sales of Civilization 6, we are starting to see a lot of posts from new players - which is awesome! Civ 6 is a really, really complicated game, and sometimes it is hard for us to give really simple answers because, well, there aren't any. However, like anything, you start learning with the basics. So, here are some basics. Pay attention to the Golden Rule, it is the most important.

    Religion is not worth it unless you are playing a Religious Civ, going for Religious or Cultural Victories, or you know what you are doing.

    Going for a Religion requires building Holy Sites early, which can really slow down building things like Settlers or military. Faith is a really strong yield, especially with Monumentality Golden Ages, Holy Sites give good Tourism, and Faith is used for National Parks and Rock Bands. However, again, not generally worth the early game delay.

    Political Philosophy before turn 60. 10 Cities by turn 100.

    Culture is extra strong in the early game, and that's because you don't have much, so even a +2 bonus could double your output, and your Tier 1 Government is a really strong boost. Expansion is the name of the early game. 10 cities by turn 100 is actually fairly ambitious. It is more a goal to strive for than a hard limit (again, see rule 10). That said if its turn 100 and you only have 4 cities, you've got a problem.

    Wonders are a trap.

    Wonders are powerful, helpful and...not necessary to win at all. Don't fall into the trap of using your favorite Wonder as a crutch and restarting because someone else built it. Yes, even the Pyramids or Forbidden Palace.

    A Timing Push is generally the strongest offensive strategy.

    A "Timing Push" is Civ 101, not just Civ VI. It means you focus your research (or "beeline") towards a more advanced military unit, build a bunch of that unit, and conquer your neighbor before they have a chance to research and build an effective counter. This is why Science is such a powerful yield in every Civ game, not just VI. All of this is x1000 for a civ with a aggressive and powerful Unique Unit.

    Wide > Tall. Size 10 cities are all you need.

    Wide strategies (building lots of small cities) are generally favored over tall strategies (building fewer cities with large populations). In part, this is because certain Districts are really strong, and you have to build new cities to spam more of the strongest Districts. "Certain Districts" = Campuses, Theatre Squares, and anything that gives you a Trade Route. Maybe Industrial Zones later on.

    Most Builder charges should be used for Resources, Chop, or Mines.

    Preferably use your chop on Districts and with Magnus in the city, although using it on Settlers is nice too. Really strong players coordinate their Builders with Magnus, and take "Magnus chopping tours" throughout their Civ in the early-to-mid game. Also, min/maxing your Builder charges is really powerful. That means Ancestral Hall/Pyramids/Serfdom/Liang shenanigans.

    Don't ignore your military. Scouts are overpowered, but If you aren't sure what to build, build a Slinger.

    Scouts help with, well, scouting your surroundings, finding rivals, getting goody huts, getting free Envoys in City States, and unlocking several important Inspirations and Eurekas. Barbarians will ruin your day if you don't nip them in the bud early. Did you know the AI is basically looking at your raw power score before it decides to attack you? It is sort of like running away from a bear: you don't have to be faster than the bear, just be faster than your buddy. You don't have to have a bigger army than the AI, just have a big enough one to deter them from attack (or, better yet, attack your even weaker neighbor).

    You only need 3-4 good tiles to make a strong city, but found your cities with at least 1 2 food/2 production tile in your first ring.

    You want to also know how to get a 2f/2p tile under your City Center. Generally, that means a Plains Hill or something like a Stone tile. Don't be shy about founding a city near/in a Desert or Tundra. As long as you can get a couple of good tiles, you'll be fine.

    Make mechanics work for you, but don't become their slave.

    Inspirations and Eurekas are your main source of early research. Use the right Policy Card for what you are building. However, it is okay to build a Builder or a Settler or two without using the right card, if it is the right "tempo" play. There are some Inspirations and Eurekas that just aren't worth getting (looking at you, Engineering Eureka).

    1 Production = 2 Culture = 2 Science = 4 Gold. Food is great up to size 4, meh between 4 and 10, and almost worthless after size 10.

    Production is the strongest yield. Culture is really strong in the early game, and then it goes down to just "generally necessary" later on. Science is strong, it is easy to get a lot of it and the stuff that you get from it is really useful if you know what you are going for. Gold is basically a stand-in for Production, except you can't build Districts with it and the gold/stuff exchange rate is a much worse deal than the production/stuff exchange rate. Food is as stated. Population just isn't that strong except when you can get another District "slot" or activate the Rationalism-style Policies.

    Play the map.

    There are maps that are more difficult than others, but generally there is no such thing as an "unwinnable map". It might be an unwinnable map for YOU right now, though. A more helpful attitude is to go back and think about what you might do differently the next time you get a map like the one that just ate your lunch.

    THE GOLDEN RULE. - Be flexible. There is no so such thing as an unbreakable rule or a "best build order" in this game.

    The golden rule. As I said earlier, there is no "Best" way. Play, learn, make mistakes, and try again. There are about a million exceptions to all of these rules, and plenty I could have put in that I didn't. All I am hoping for is that this will be a good guide to get people started in the learning process.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2020
    oedali, Suntechnique, Infixo and 7 others like this.
  2. Bibor

    Bibor Doomsday Machine

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    Perhaps this was true in the age of 100% Magnus and GotH. Not anymore.

    Machinery costs 275 science. 3 archers cost 180 production, less with Agoge. That's straight up production to science conversion apparently nobody takes into consideration.

    Production converts fruits from science and culture into, at the very least, more science and culture.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2020
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  3. knighterrant81

    knighterrant81 Warlord

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    So the Eureka gets you 50%, or 137.5 I don't know if it rounds up or down off the top of my head, but lets say 138.

    So you spent 180 Production (P) to make 138 Science (S). Of course I usually upgrade my Archers, so it costs me 105 P (to build the Slingers) and 180 gold (g). So it costs me

    (180 g) x (1 P/4 g) = 45 P
    45 P + 105 P = 155 P (Side note: if we assume my formula is essentially correct, we've saved 25 "effective" P by upgrading Slingers instead of hard-building them. Of course, that's what Bibor is questioning but math for the win!)

    So I convert 155 P into 138 S. I'm not sure how that invalidates the formula? I mean, it looks like a bad deal doing this math because 155 P should get you 310 S but you have to factor in that the Archers have a lot of real value in the game even if all they ever do is sit inside your cities.

    I guess what I'm saying is that this is the formula I use in my head when evaluating edge cases around things like about what building to build first, comparing Trade Routes, or which tile I want my citizens to work. As far as I can see, things like Inspiration makes the Production I put into Archers even more valuable, because I see the Science from the Eureka as and essentially free bonus. I'm going to build the Archers every time anyway, so thanks for the free 138 Science!
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2020
  4. Bibor

    Bibor Doomsday Machine

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    What I’m saying is that well targeted production is worth more than the formula would suggest, not in the least because culture and science cost sizeable amounts of production and food.
     
  5. knighterrant81

    knighterrant81 Warlord

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    Yes, definitely. I'm just trying to give out some basic ideas. My goal with this particular statement was to give a rough idea of the values of each yield compared to each other. Obviously, there are many fine details. Production towards Archers is worth more than the formula states if you are researching Machinery soon and/or have an aggressive neighbor, for instance. But it is a starting place.
     
  6. Liegence

    Liegence Warlord

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    Question on the 10 cities by Turn 100 thing... I often find I don’t even have room to place 10 cities, but I also tend to place on fresh water or by coast.... should I be spamming open swaths of flat land with no water anyway? Is settling without water good strategy that I’m missing out on?
     
  7. monikernemo

    monikernemo Warlord

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    are your cities close or are they far apart?
     
  8. knighterrant81

    knighterrant81 Warlord

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    No. Fresh Water is a given. I might have one city that requires an Aqueduct every few games, but that's pretty rare.

    There is almost no good reason not to crowd cities as close to each other as you can. The only reason not to put them the minimum distance apart is if you are going for some sort of terrain benefit (like Fresh Water, or like a Strategic Resource).

    If you are crowded by the AI, strongly consider rushing a neighbor and taking their cities. The 10 by 100 rule doesn't specify conquest or settlement for a reason.

    Sometimes you have a map where you can't fit 10 cities. Sometimes you have a map where you have a tough AI really close. Those are the harder maps. Its completely possible to win with fewer than 10 cities, it will just be tough and you will be behind most of the time and you need to have a better command of the game mechanics. 6-8 and you'll do okay. You can always build a base and rush to Gunpowder to get some more territory in the middle game.
     
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