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The Art of War

Discussion in 'Civ3 Strategy Articles' started by ironfang, Nov 27, 2001.

  1. ironfang

    ironfang Warlord

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Virginia
    I have been studying this since the day that I purchased this game, and I feel that I have developed some pretty interesting theories on warfare. Of course, this pertains primarily to the Americans on a Huge Pangeia world.

    War has many usefull purposes in CIV3. The secret is knowing when to declare war, how to conduct war, and when to stop fighting and sue for peace. I know in CIV2 that war was conducted 9 out of 10 times until on civilization was in smoldering
    ruins. Its not quite the same with CIV3 (with the above criteria).

    Q. I'm afraid of war... what do I do?

    A. Build up your military. Kissing butt doesnt work for long, and your bound to encounter militaristic nations who love easy
    prey. The AI respects numbers, and hates frivolousness. The AI will definantly attack you if your military is low on numbers(aka. weak).

    Q. I have a military, how do I know if its good enough?

    A.You have a few options here. You may contact your military advisor and he will tell you if you can support more units. You may also use embassies and spies to determine the strength of enemy cities.

    Q. Creating military units interferes with the growth of my cities!

    A. If you dont have enough military to stave off invaders, you very quickly lose your precious cities to a more powerfull Civ.
    A side note on this. Make sure to have at least the following in cities before continuing development;
    Size Defenders
    1-6 2
    7-9 3
    10-12 4

    If you dont wanna be war mongerers, keep those numbers in mind. It will deter other civs from attacking you. But be mindfull of the fact that you will need to have many cities under this concept.

    Q. I want to conquor the world! How do I start?

    A. The world was a big place. As the old saying goes "Rome wasnt built in one day". You need to strategize, and determine your objective "prior" to mobilizing your military. As history has proven time and time again, a powerfull military is nothing without a good strategy. Analyze the terrain, get world maps, territory maps, find out about the technology of the worlds civs, distinguish alliances, and form your own.

    When attacking come up with an "end game" plan. Dont let your anger or pride get you into a very prolonged campaign. While a Democracy has "war weariness", long wars will wear down ALL civs, regardless of your government.

    If a civ is large, slice it up into acceptable slices. Conquor it piece by piece. Use physical boundaries (oceans and lakes preferably, then mountains) to create the pieces. Before you ever attack another kingdom, figure out how you will defend it once you have conquored it. Once you have conquored that slice, impliment your defense plan, and then repeat. Soon you will have expanded your kingdom in a solid fashion. This is just one strategy.

    Even if your goal really is anihilation, create a back up plan just in case you need to abandon your assault. You never know when an unexpected enemy is going to appear.

    Q. My military advisor says my military is strong compared to the rest. What now?

    A. Pick an enemy (or the person pissing you off). Compare your technologies. Are you more advanced? If you are unsure, move one of your units up to one of their larger cities. If they have a defender such as spearman appear (and you have Knights), then you are probably superior.

    Make sure your military units are as modern as possible, and if you are working on a technology that improves military (metalurgy, gunpowder) and almost there, wait for the advance, and then upgrade.

    Q. How do I prepare for war?

    Mobilize your military along your enemies borders. During this time, set your inside cities ato start producing Horsemen/Knights/Calvary. Cities closer to the edge of your kingdom, build primary defensive units (spearmen/pikemen/musketeers).

    Keep your cities producing offensive and defensive units throughout the entire war. Resist the urge to change to Universities/Cathedrals unless you ABSOLUTELY must (due to moral).

    Try and secure luxuries within your nation or trade for them. At this time make sure your "other" neighbors are either in on the attack (Military Alliance) or polite with you. THIS IS NESCACARY. When you go to war, your military strength will dwindle as units die besieging cities. Your neighbors will eventually take advantage of this so keep an eye on their attitude
    towards you.

    Once you have your units assembled (recommended at least 4 horse-types, 6 offensive, and 2 defensive... and 4+ artillery doesnt hurt either) move in for the attack. Take stock in the fact that each city you face will have AT LEAST 3 of its most modern defensive units.

    Make sure to formally declare war before you attack. Saves you face value (you can do this while your units are outside of their cities).

    Q. Ok. I have taken my first city(ies) what now?

    A. Keep those military units building!!! DO NOT STOP MILITARY PRODUCTION UNTIL A FORMAL TREATY IS SIGNED!!! Just because you have captured some of their cities, doesnt mean they are going to just throw up the white flag and surrender. In fact, you can expect a MAJOR counter-offensive. That is why I recommended at LEAST 2 modern defensive units.

    Once you have taken a city, make sure to move forward defensive units from your homeland cities that are producing defensive units. KEEP THEM STREAMING. If you cant wait, send in already produced defensive units, and replace them the units on the production line.

    After a successfull attack fortify your unit in the newly captured city, or keep them within the city, especially the skirmishing units (horsemen/knights/calvary). Attack any units that attempt to retake the city with skirmishing units, and then retreat into the city. This will weaken the oncomming counter attack.

    Dont forget that you will lose offensive units in assaults. Thats normal. Just make sure your cities are producing replacements.

    Q. How do I stop the enemy counter-attack?

    A. Depending on your end game strategy, this may be done in a number of ways. If you have met your goals, and the enemy is continuing his counter-offensive, destroying roads/rails inside your enemies borders may slow his units down as they approach your cities. This will give you the opportunity to used garrisoned cannons/catapults to bombard attacking units before they reach your city, and also give your skirmishing units a chance to attack those units with the advantage of the terrain improvements on your side of the border.

    Using fast moving units you may wish to target valuable resources deep within enemy territory, and pillage roads leading to them. This will halt production of units reliant upon those resources until a road is re-established.

    The third solution (and works well in conjunction with the above) is to bring another enemy against your enemy on a different front. This will force your victim to redirect its counter offensive efforts.

    Q. I have many useless enemy cities. What do I do?

    If you have conquored the city, you have the options of using the city for its territory, defensive bonuses (if any), resources, luxuries, etc.. Or you may use it in addtional ways.

    The enemy cherishes his cities, and will always desire the return of lost cities. You may use this city as a bargaining chip at the peace table. You may also use this city to bning your enemy into war with other civs, by selling it to a third party. This will bring another civ into the mix, reward you, take a useless city off your hand, and bring another civ against your enemy.

    Q. I have been at war for a while, when do I stop?

    A. If you are asking this question, then there is a reason for wanting to sue for peace. There are a number of reasons to stop a war. Here are a few;
    1. I have achieved my military objectives
    (mentioned above).
    2. This war isnt going anywhere (stalemate).
    3. I am falling behind technologicaly.
    4. I have discovered a new technology that needs to be implemented.
    5. I'm getting whooped.
    6. My infrastructure is falling behind.
    7. Im over extended and cant get troops out to the front lines fast enough.

    If you have a clearly defined military strategy, you probably wont run into the problems 2,5,6 and 7. A clearly defined strategy/goal, will help guide your military arm, and put a definite end in sight. Simply declaring "I wanna wipe out the enemy" may be a bad mistake.

    On a huge map, civs spread out. They have many hard to reach citie that take Medieval and Ancient units time to reach. The longer you are at war, the less you spend on civ improvements. Even though your enemy is being thoroughly punished, surrounding civs are growin technologicaly more advanced, and militarily more powerfull.

    Q. I wanna end the war. How do I do it?

    A. Make sure you have enough military to hold onto the cities you had before going to war. If you find yourself over extended, sue for peace and offer the captured cities back as a peace sign. In the mean time, pull back your military units to cities you want, and fortify your national boundaries. Dont let pride to your head. It may not be the advesary you took the city from who may take it back. It could be a neighbor who notices your militarily weakened civ and decide to attack.


    I hope these Q and A helped people who are having problems with war. These are things I have learned from my run at the game.

    ironfang
     
  2. LeroyJr

    LeroyJr Chieftain

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    Excellent write up.

    One thing I would add is that in later years be very much aware of who the friends of your enemy are. The friends of your enemies are you enemies afterall.

    In my current game I am at a point where I am technologically far enough ahead to take a run at the #2 horse in the race and weaken them enough to have no real threats the rest of the way. Just before I was about to attack the English (#2) signed a MPP with Greece who is #3 and my next door neighbor that I share what must be a 100 square border with (huge map, all civs in). All of the sudden attacking the English would mean also fighting the Greeks at the same time. Now I would need to split my forces in two and somehow deal with a massive big border with the Greeks where any one of 15 outskirt cities could be attacked.

    Also to factor in is that the English are on another continent so I would have to transport troops over to attack them. I have a MPP and ROP with Joan of Arc who is in about 6th place. France would be my staging ground for such an attack. Now if I attacked England and had the Greeks declare war on me things get dicey on the big scene. Because I have a MPP with J of A she would declare war on the English. If I find I need to use the majority of my forces defending vs the Greeks and cannot commit to the English end then J of A will get wiped out by Liz and #2 all of the sudden is a legitimate match to my powers.

    Also one thing I have found playing on a huge map with all civs in the game is that nobody has enough room. Sort of like the real world actually. Some big empires like the USA and then little countries like Denmark and Switzerland. In my current game the Aztecs have two cities, the Germans 8 and some other little guys. So when it comes to war, well everyone would love to expand if they can so are ready to go at the drop of the hat. In that same game the Iroquios and Zulu's both declared war on me for no reason and now I was at war at the west and north end of my empire. A quick call to the Germans and Greeks quickly got me alliances vs the Iroquios. The Chinese joined me vs the Zulu's. I committed a few troops to the Iroquios war and focused on the Zulu's. Things went okay vs the Zulu's and the Greeks and Germans went wacko on the Iroquios and wiped them off the board. So the second someone declares war on my I try to get their neighbors involved in the bloodbath. Make them fight a war on multiple sides of their country and spread them out.

    Caesar once set a city down on the last available square on my huge island, so I declared war against him and got all four of his neighbors to declare war on the Romans. I took over the city on my island and the other four civs eliminated the Romans. I never left the island the entire time.

    My only other advice would be to take a city at a time. I tend to get drug into a war and then attack about 5 cities at a time. Better to send the majority of your forces vs one city and take it out rather than splitting your forces up. If at all possible you should have a few troops committed to a rear assault though as well. Make them split their forces up and defend on multiple fronts. The rear force should just be enough to be a menace though and force them to deal with it.

    Does anyone know any tricks to the trade when you want peace but they refuse to talk to our envoy? Sometimes my Civ is burning down and the ^*&%*( will not answer my call for a Peace Treaty. Very annoying so I have to put a little more hurting on them.

    Finally the penalty for some dumbass civ flying their flag on one of my cities is genocide. Just the rules. Make sure your cities are defended because the computer without fail will always attack your weakest city.
     
  3. Style

    Style Chieftain

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    I learned that the computer attacks your weakest city the hard way. It must have been my first game of CivIII, and I was in the modern age. I had a large city, about size 26 defended by only a swordsman. I had been reinforcing ALL of my cities with my newly researched Mech Infantry, but I guess I just left this city out. As my luck would have it, a French cavalry unit came along, and attacked it without warning. The cavalry easily won the battle. But instead of keeping the city (which would have been an easy re-capture either militarily or culturally), he decided to raze it. After attacking some French units, I witnessed for the first time the danger of Mutual Protection Pacts. First the English, then the Germans, then the Japanese, then the Indians. Fighting a war on multiple fronts, especialy for a first time player as I was at the time is VERY difficult. I gave up.
     
  4. Joben

    Joben Queensguard

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    Speaking of 'The Art of War' get a copy of the original by Sun Tzu.
    a good translation is at amazon.com right now for pretty cheap.
    Its been more useful to me (and a LOT more interesting) then
    most stratagy guides designed directly for a game.

    The aplication of some of the stratagys and priciples
    set forth work very well vs. the AI.
     
  5. Cerv

    Cerv Chieftain

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    Location:
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    I have to agree with everything you have said however I have a bit of a problem. I am currently at war with the Japanese on a continent other than my own. My initial objectives to weaken the Japanese to prevent the overrun of China and to gain access to more oil was completed long ago. I REALLY want to make peace to impliment new tech units however the Japanese refuse to talk to me, how on earth am I supposed to keep to objectives if the enemy will refuse to lie down. Not to mention the fact they are fighting and suffering terrible losses as a consequence. Even so i'm having to go overboard on the luxuries to stop me civ being torn apart by rioting fools.

    Is there some other way to bring about peace other than trying to get these stupid other civs to talk to you? Is there some way to force peace on another civ? If so how, I would be really thankful if someone could tell me.
     
  6. ABX

    ABX Chieftain

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  7. Kingpin

    Kingpin Captain-General

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    You can even download a free copy at Project Gutenburg:
    http://www.promo.net/pg/

    Just search for Art of War or Sun Tsu.
     
  8. Roberto Tomba

    Roberto Tomba Chieftain

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    Seems like it's also a good idea to have a cash reserve handy before going to war. This is useful for:

    1) emergency "hurry" jobs (in case the enemy amphibiously lands in a weakly guarded area)
    2) quick builds of temples and such in conquered cities

    One thing that's burned me more than once is going to war, conquering enemy cities, and accepting a peace treaty, only to have the cultural influence of the enemy absorb the cities I just captured! :eek: I believe, once a city starts producting culture, it's less vulnerable to being absorbed by proximity cultural influence.
     
  9. theinfamousx

    theinfamousx Chieftain

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    Good analysis of warfare in Civ3. One strategy I sometimes use when I capture a city that's close to the enemy capital and far from mine, or otherwise prone to cultural reversion for whatever reason, is that I starve to population to 1 or 2 so as to grow it back with my own people. This slows down the growth of the city obviously because in a sense you're starting from scratch, but it saves me from using a settler to take the place of a razed city. What do you think about this strategy?
     
  10. Roberto Tomba

    Roberto Tomba Chieftain

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    I'm too impatient to conduct an extended siege by starving the population. I prefer bombing. ;) I'm in the middle of a war with Babylon where I took three of his cities along my border. They all started with populations in the 15-17 range; after a few turns of 10 bombers pounding them each turn, they're down to a size of '1'. :eek: I do also bomb/bombard the irrigation and roadways to stunt their growth, so in a way I am doing what you suggest.

    But, once the population is that low, it does three good things:

    1) all the bombardment attacks will start going to the defenders
    2) If you ask for the city in a peace settlement, it's much more likely that the AI will agree.
    3) you can very easily get the population balance in your favor by adding WORKERS to the city.

    There's another excellent thread about the amazing value of workers. Adding them to a devastated, recently captured enemy city is one of the more obscure - but very handy - uses.
     
  11. theinfamousx

    theinfamousx Chieftain

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    So you bomb the city before taking it I presume, but when I said I starve the population I meant after I take the city. Once the city is under my control I turn all the workers in the city into entertainers or tax collectors, so there is starvation in the city and in a few turns the population is down and I can repopulate with my own countrymen.
     
  12. peanutgallery83

    peanutgallery83 Chieftain

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    Very good strategy. Only a few things I've noticed:

    -If you go to war, then sign alliances with the neighbors of your enemy to get them to fight your enemy also, DON'T leave those alliance hanging out to dry. While it may seem like a breeze to sit on your own little island (or whatever) and watch your alliance partners beat the crap out of your enemy for you, beware! It seems the civs in civ3 are smart enough that if you do that through the ENTIRE war, they'll eventually give up the fight and sign a peace treaty, and you're more likely to get into a major conflict with them later. (Seems they like to hold grudges for letting their troops get killed while you were lazy!) At least be sure to send in a squad of 7-10 troops every now and then just to save face.

    -In terms of alliances, MPP's, etc. BE CAREFUL if you plan to attack someone, check to see who their friends are, and who the friends of the friends are before you attack. I'm playing on a HUGE map of the real earth map, with all 16 civs involved. Because one civ (Greece) declared war on me, and i in turn attacked them, I managed to piss of the Aztecs who were allied with the Greeks. Anyways....though alliances, and MPP's, nearly every civ was involved on what I named "World War I" within 4 turns. Because alliances were formed people were continually declaring war on someone who was allied with someone, who was allied with the country who declared war in the first place, so consequently alliances were constantly being broken (i was guilty of this too).

    Anyways, that war started in 1653....I'm now in 1999, and the war STILL isn't over. 7 civs have been wiped out (5 by me...including 2 people i was originally allied with). While the alliances have become more firmly established, there isn't anyone who trusts another civ enough to give them a right of passage because of all the broken alliances. It's really quite the mess, and of the remaining 9 civs...7 are currently still involved in "World War I". So just be careful who you ally with and then who you attack.
     
  13. George-W-Ceaser

    George-W-Ceaser Chieftain

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    It was only my first game and I was france playing a large world map, i had allied the Indians and Japanees. and when I was going to attack the Indians with my Marines i had persuaded the Japanees to help and While i caputerd 4 indian villages i was counter-attacked by a huge roup of Veteran Barbarians that belonged to the Indians after my defeat i was again attacked and the Japenees had no intent of helping. Then i remberd "The only allies are the Enemy." Now im prepard to nuke all my allies when i can!
     
  14. Iron Star

    Iron Star Chieftain

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    Grapevine, TX.
    I need some help on making peace! It is now 1976 and I am playing with all rival civ. slots open on a standard map. the WHOLE world has been at war with eachother since 2019 B.C.
    None of the other nations will listen to my envoys when I try to make peace. None of them will make peace with eachother either because they each break treaties so they don't trust eachother. It has come to a point where in between all of the countries there is a buffer of unclaimed territory of razed towns. They were small non-growing towns that were there to harvest resources. So everybody has a bad reputation with everybody else.

    What do I do?

    _______________________

    -Iron Star:soldier:
     
  15. Roberto Tomba

    Roberto Tomba Chieftain

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    That's an ugly situtation to get into, but it can be repaired with time. Here's what I've seen:

    1) Basically, your enemies are more willing to listen to your envoys if you approach from a position of strength. The best show of strength is conquest. So, capture one if their cities, then try to talk to them. Keep repeating until they start to receive your envoys. Generally, I've seen that you have to take at least 2 cities before the enemy will listen. And, the more cities you take, the stronger your position gets, and the more the enemy will concede.

    2) If there's been a prolonged bloodbath (with enemy troops battering themselves against your city walls), the enemy will start to receive envoys. But, that takes longer. I have a game now on Marla's real world map, playing Japan, where Russia and China ganged up on me, and proceded to lose probably 20 units each while only taking out 5 of mine, and only damaging my "landscaping" improvements (irrigation, etc.) After a while, they were all willing to listen.

    Once they start to listen, your negotiations become key. Even after getting their asses kicked for 500 years, rival civs might still want more from you than you will get from them. Here's something that works fantastically well:

    1) offer the STRONGEST Civ one of your cities. This should be one that's out in the middle of nowhere and tiny (size 1-3). Alternately, make it in the heart of your civilization, where it can get swallowed up by your (superior) culture. You should have a garrison that you can move outside the city limits before giving them your city. That way, if/when you go back to war, you can march back in and take the city (since the rival won't have time to put a garrison in or build one).

    2) also give them your World Map. Early on (pre-1000 AD), the other Civs seem to view World Maps as being as precious as technology. You have to weigh what this might do to your overall position, but that's another option.

    3) ask for as many gold per turn as you can. Once, I gave my world map and a size 3 city, and was able to get **60 GOLD PER TURN**:eek: This serves three purposes:

    a) You cripple your rival's technological development, since they'll have to adjust their domestic allocation just to avoid bankrupty.

    b) Their population will likely become destabilized for the same reason (less investment in the happiness of the citizens).

    c) with the extra cash flowing in, you can invest more heavily in technology or the happiness of your people.

    There is the risk that your rival will declare war and break the treaty, but that will likely not happen for a few turns. It's also good to see if you can get a lump sum that wipes out their treasury, even if the per-turn amount is lower. That way, if they do stab you in the back, at least you have something to show for it.

    You'll have to pick who gets the above type of offer. Consider offering extra luxuries to one civ, world map to another, and a tiny city to yet another. If you can cripple their ability to make war, you might not have to worry about them...at least not for a while.
     
  16. Sekandar

    Sekandar Chieftain

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    All very interesting and useful suggestions here folks. Thanks.

    I'm nearing the end of a game (on a normal-sized planet) where I've whittled the competing Civs down to two. I already met the victory conditions on the basis of culture, but there are a few things I learned along the way in the context of modern conquests:

    You are all quite correct to point out the difficulties associated with the MPPs. I already complained in another forum that there appears to be no way to negotiate for peace alongside your allies, leaving them to fight a war even after you've achieved all of your military objectives. C'est la vie. The only thing you can really do is to placate your former allies with gold, luxuries, maps or towns.

    On the other hand, MPPs don't always work very well for your enemies either. Keep checking with your foreign advisor to ascertain the status of your enemies' MPPs. They do eventually expire, and then it takes at least a turn for them to renew their alliance. If you successfully attack one of your opponents during the hiatus, the former allies will often stay out of the conflict (particularly if you are successful).

    Once railroads come into play, you should do everything in your power to negotiate ROPs with the target of conquest civ. You can promise them 100s of gold per turn, and luxuries galore; just don't offer them towns, technology or outright payments of gold. That will convince even a furious civilization to reach agreement with you. As long as you attack them in the same turn you make the agreement, you won't have to pay them anything.

    With the ROP in place, use espionage to ascertain the distribution of forces in the enemy cities. Ignore the troops outside the cities. You can send your troops in on the enemy rails and mass them in sufficient numbers outside the cities to conquer as many as you please (or have sufficient forces to do so). If you don't outright overwhelm the civilization, they are usually prepared to negotiate a peace in the same turn (they don't ignore your envoys when you've just conquered half or more of their cities).
     
  17. Cort Haus

    Cort Haus Warlord

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    It might be easier to get peace if you don't have a history of stabbing civs in the back. I generally avoid MPPs and use ROPs linked to trade deals everywhere to help keep the peace, rather than using ROPs for sneak attacks as described above. Up to Monarch it works OK. (On Emporer they're so treacherous that no-one can be ever be trusted)

    In most of my games I can usually end wars when I want by having a good reputation (I avoid breaking deals) and, after crushing a city or three, march up to the next with a big stack. At that point they're usually ready to make a deal. I don't think you need to conquer as many as half unless it's early. Later on, a couple of their core cities and a threat to the capital is usually enough. (I've found they seem to like at least a few turns of war before talking though - however much they're getting shoot up.)

    If fighting a defensive war (to avoid triggering an opponent's MPP, or to avoid war-weariness), holding out with low losses against a couple of attack waves within you own territory can be enough for them to talk peace, especially if they have other fronts or objectives.

    On the issue of not being able to get your allies in on a peace deal : a option is to sit out until the end of the 20 turns of the alliance. If the enemy is ready to make a deal, first go to your allies and cancel the 'expired' MPP or Alliance. Their affection for you will falter, but not be stung as much as breaking the deal within 20 turns, and shouldn't hurt your international reputation.

    I recognise that 100% warmongers don't give a flying furball about reputation, but I find a solid rep and a solid defence are contributory foundations for builder-oriented strategies.
     
  18. Sekandar

    Sekandar Chieftain

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    Cort, you are the wind beneath my furball...:crazyeye:

    Good points, but I only meant to stress that concerns about your subsequent reputation shouldn't be a consideration in betrayal if you intend to adopt the strategy of using ROP to invade your opponents. A good reputation is useful up to a point, but nukes will keep the peace.

    I recognize the advantage of waiting until your MPP is about to lapse, but I find there are other considerations that dominate my decision as to when to go to war. Most of the ROP attacks I made were in the modern era, and targeted those civilizations that were just beginning to industrialize... I had to do SOMETHING to shut down those darn coal plants, since global warming was turning my civilization into a desert. Do I get brownie points for being an Environmental Warmonger? Doesn't Lincoln look just a BIT too much like Ralph Nader with a beard?...
     
  19. Cort Haus

    Cort Haus Warlord

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    re : Eco-wars

    Yes, they don't seem to clean up their pollution very throughly - though at least they get pollution compared with Civ1, Civ 2. Not that it seems to inhibit them. I was wondering whether donating a dozen workers to the polluting Civ might get them to clear it up. - cheaper than a dozen tanks :) - When my Civ is getting desert-formed by their mess I console myself that theirs probably is too.

    Actually, I build coal-plants myself now, though I never did in Civ1/2. Shield volume doesn't affect pollution - what does is huge population, so I hold back on the hospitals until the eco techs get near at the end of the industrial era. Also, the AI irrigates much more than mines (hits their late game production, *and* pollutes) so their cities bloat out rapidly after hospitals. I play standard maps so maybe pollution & warming is worse on the larger ones.

    CTP IIRC had Eco-pacts and 'Clean-up!-threats' as part of the diplomacy, and eco-warrior units & wonder(s).
     
  20. Sanguinarius

    Sanguinarius Chieftain

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    23
    Location:
    Arizona, USA


    Do the other civs look at your total military size or do they look at the units that are positioned IN your cities to decide of you're weak or strong? I'm wanting to know, is it possible to look "weak" (but not be), so another civ will attack, and you can go to war with the units that they didn't know you had.
     

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