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The Flemish Community

Discussion in 'Civ5 - New Civilizations' started by Moriboe, Aug 27, 2012.

  1. Moriboe

    Moriboe Chieftain

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2010
    Messages:
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    Location:
    Belgium
    This mod adds Flanders as a playable civilization. Leader: Robrecht III. Available on the mod browser. Works in all versions of Civ.
    Now with amazing graphics by janboruta!


    UA: Urban Prosperity. +5% Gold and Production in your 4 largest cities for each Policy Branch finished.
    (vanilla & G+K only: +1 Culture for each specialist).
    UU: City Militia, replaces Pikeman. Slightly stronger and bonus in Marsh.
    UB: Belfort, replaces Castle. Cheaper but less Defense. Bonus Culture and Gold (varies with version).
    UB: Beguinage, replaces Garden. Must be built on flatlands. +1 Happiness (vanilla only) +1 Faith (G+K & BNW), +1 Food (BNW).

    To counter potential criticism as to Flanders not being worthy of the title "civilization", I'll include the game text below ;)

    History/Factoid:
    Spoiler :
    Antwerp, 1585. After 14 months of siege the city falls to the Spanish army. Only a couple of decades before it had been the richest city in Europe, accounting for 40% of world trade, and one of the most populous. Now over half its population - including many skilled tradesmen - migrate north, laying the commercial foundation for the subsequent Dutch Golden Age. The Dutch fleet, originally involved in attempts to end the siege, starts a blockade that would last for centuries to come. And so foreign rule continued for the Southern Netherlands, whose Dutch-speaking territories are nowadays known as the Flemish Community, comprising the north of Belgium.

    In the Middle Ages, this region consisted of the county of Flanders, the duchy of Brabant and the county of Loon. It has been a wealthy region for most of its history. Due to this and its central position, the area was strongly contested by Europe's great powers. Struggles for greater autonomy and to protect the local culture and language are a common theme throughout the history of Flanders.


    The County of Flanders

    The County of Flanders was one of the original secular fiefs of France and for centuries was one of the most affluent regions in Europe. The first count of Flanders was Baldwin I, appointed in 862 by the Frankish king. Initially this was meant to secure the safety of the northern French border from Viking invasions. But soon the counts extended their influence by incorporating the surrounding territories into the county.

    In the second half of the 12th century, the county went through a period of great prosperity. Flanders' flourishing trading towns made it one of the most urbanised parts of Europe. After Paris, Ghent was the biggest city north of the Alps. Then the king of France wanted to definitively annex Flanders, and started the Franco-Flemish War in 1297. The territory's autonomous urban centres were instrumental in defeating the French invasion attempt, defeating the French at the Battle of the Golden Spurs in 1302. Subsequent Flemish campaigning was less succesful, but the county managed to remain independent until the start of Burgundian rule in 1369.

    During the Burgundian period, Flanders became an area of intellectual and artistic free thought, noted for crafts and the production of luxury goods. Painters in the wider region were collectively referred to as the "Flemish Primitives", among them Robert Campin, Jan van Eyck and Rogier van der Weyden. These artists made significant advances in natural representation and illusionism, and their work often features complex iconography. Aided by the workshop system, high-end panels were mass produced both for sale on the open market and on commission, being spread all over Europe.


    The Duchy of Brabant

    The Duchy of Brabant was officially established within the Holy Roman Empire in 1183, but its origins lie with the County of Leuven, which emerged about a century before. It rapidly increased in size and power, acquiring great influence and more titles over time. After the Battle of Worringen in 1288, duke Jan I of Brabant, supported by Arnold V of Loon, also acquired the Duchy of Limburg. In 1430 both Duchies are inherited by the house of Burgundy and incorporated into the Burgundian Netherlands. After a tumultuous succession, the Netherlands then passed to the house of Habsburg, and later to Spain.

    At the end of the 15th century, Antwerp, the biggest city in Brabant, gained importance due to the decline of Bruges. In the 16th century it experienced several economic booms. At its height, it is estimated that the port of Antwerp was earning the Spanish crown seven times more revenues than the Americas. The university of Leuven helped shape men like Gerardus Mercator, whose projection world map set the standard we still use today. Anatomist and physician Andreas Vesalius became author of one of the most influential books on human anatomy, "De humani corporis fabrica". Brussels served as the capital for the whole of the Netherlands, containing the magnificent Palace of Coudenberg, renowned througout Europe. Thus Brabant formed the heart of the Netherlands until it was divided after the Dutch revolt.


    Division and Decline

    In the 16th century religious trouble was brewing all over Europe. The iconoclasm of the Beeldenstorm swept northward through the Netherlands and two years later open revolt against the Spanish broke loose. It initially started in the north, but the Dutch-speaking cities in the Southern Netherlands joined the revolt. The Francophone part - French Flanders and current Wallonia - supported the Spanish king. This Eighty Years War lead to the founding of the Dutch Republic. Attempts to regain the south were undertaken, but in the end were abandoned due to changes in the political and economic situation. During the last attempt a deep division between the now firmly Catholic south and Calvinist north had also became apparent. The exodus northwards continued though, and while the Southern Netherlands went into decline, the mass emigration became an important driving force behind the Dutch Golden Age. The arts however remained at a relatively impressive level for another century with painters such as Peter Paul Rubens and Anthony van Dyck.

    In later centuries the Flemish Community rode on the waves of history. The War of the Spanish Succession ravaged the land and the Southern Netherlands were passed on to Austrian rule. Under the reign of empress Maria-Theresia in the 18th century, the lands economically flourished again, but large-scale reforms by her successor caused a rebellion, leading to the short-lived United States of Belgium. The rebellion was crushed, but the political idea of the state of Belgium was born.

    Then came Napoleon, who abolished the Ancien Régime in 1795, meaning the official end to the counties and duchies comprising the Flemish Community. Heavy fighting took place in the Peasants' War as a reaction against French occupation. During the Congress of Vienna in 1815, France had to give up its rule of the Southern Netherlands which moved to the Dutch Republic, creating the United Kingdom of the Netherlands. This too, which short-lived, when the Belgian Revolution erupted in Brussels in 1830. Reasons for the revolt include the lack of representation and religious differences. Dutch attempts to regain the territory were stopped with French aid.

    The creating of Belgium however did not mean complete freedom for the Flemish, as French became the kingdom's sole official language. A citation ascribed to Charles Rogier, one of the leaders of the revolution, goes: "La Belgique sera Latine ou elle ne sera pas" - "Belgium will be Latin or it won't be". Education, and all public life, in Flanders became Francophone.


    The Flemish Movement

    The first reactions against Francophone dominance came from artistic circles, with writers such as Conscience, Rodenbach and Gezelle on the forefront. In 1870 the movement became wider, with students becoming a driving force. Feelings of resentment were so strong that during the First World War a group called the Activists even collaborated with their "Germanic brothers" in the hope to advance the Flemish cause, though most of the population disproved of this.

    During the interbellum, the Flemish Movement became more socially oriented through the Frontbeweging, an organization of Flemish soldiers who complained about the lack of consideration for their language in the army, and in Belgium in general. A persisting rumour is that many Dutch-speaking soldiers were slaughtered because they could not understand orders given to them in French by Francophone officers. A yearly pilgrimage to the IJzertoren, which remembers the Flemish soldiers who died during the First World War, is still held to this day. The Frontbeweging became a political movement, dedicated to peace, tolerance and autonomy.

    In the 1960s the Flemish movement once more gathered momentum and, in 1962, the linguistic borders within Belgium were finally drawn up, with Brussels being designated as a bilingual city. Also, in 1967 an official Dutch version of the Belgian Constitution was adopted. For more than 130 years, the Dutch version of the Belgian constitution had been only a translation without legal value. The late 1960s saw all major Belgian political parties splitting up into either Flemish or Francophone wings. In 1968 a student revolt succeeded in splitting the university of Leuven; a new Francophone branch was constructed south of the language barrier.

    Today many consider the Francophone "threat" far from over, especially in the towns around Brussels, where many Francophones working in the capital have settled. Laws to protect the Flemish culture and language have been enacted, and are often seen as discriminatory by foreigners who lack knowledge of the historical context. The actuality of the tensions could be seen in the 2010 federal elections, where the New Flemish Alliance political party gained a substantial plurality in Flanders.

    Another aspect though is Flemish prosperity driving demands for greater autonomy, like many times in the past. The so-called "Flemish Diamond", one of the larger European metropolitan regions with a population density of more than 800 per square kilometer, has been a centre of economic innovation for centuries. A strong urban network has been attested between the separate cities from the 12th century onwards. In 1835, the first railroad of the European continent was built within the Flemish Diamond. Today, the Port of Antwerp is the second-largest in Europe. Flanders in general, and the Flemish Diamond in particular, counts among the most productive and wealthiest regions in Europe.

    Factoid

    The Flemish Westvleteren 12 Trappist beer was rated "best beer in the world" in 2012, as most years before. Flanders is also home to InBev, the world's largest brewery company.

    Robrecht III biography:
    Spoiler :
    Robrecht (or Robert in English) was the oldest son of Guy of Dampierre from his first marriage with Matilda of Béthune. His father essentially transferred the reign of Flanders to him in November 1299, during his war with Philip IV of France.

    Robert of Béthune gained military fame in Italy, when he fought at the side of his father-in-law, Charles I of Sicily, against the last Hohenstaufens. Together with his father he took part in 1270 in the Eighth Crusade, led by Saint Louis. After his return from the Crusade he continued to be a loyal aid for his father, politically and militarily, in the fight against the attempts of the French King Philip IV the Fair to add Flanders to the French crown lands.

    Guy of Dampierre broke all feudal bonds with the French king in 1297, mainly under his influence. When in 1300 the resistance seemed hopeless Robert allowed himself to be taken prisoner, together with his father and brother, and taken to the French King. Shortly before that he had become the de facto ruler of Flanders. He was locked in the castle of Chinon. Contrary to popular belief, and the romantic portrayal by Hendrik Conscience in his novel "The Lion of Flanders", he did not take part in the Battle of the Golden Spurs. The novel however made him a symbol of Flemish nationalism.

    In 1305, after the Treaty of Athis-sur-Orge was signed, he was allowed to return to his county. His father had died in captivity a few months before. The terms of the treaty included loss of territory and a heavy fine, but ensured his continued rule over an autonomous Flanders. The execution of the treaty would mark the rule of Count Robert. Initially he achieved some success in moving the countryside and the cities to fulfill their financial duties. However, in 1310 he started to radically resist the French, with support of his subjects and his family.

    He managed to make a stand against the French King both diplomatically and militarily. When in 1319 he marched to Lille, which had been lost by terms of the treaty, the militia from Ghent refused to cross the Leie with him. When his grandson Louis I of Nevers pressured him as well, Robert gave up the battle and went to Paris in 1320 to restore feudal bonds with the French King. But even after that, he would hamper the execution of the Treaty of Athis-sur-Orge. Robert died in 1322, two months after his oldest son. He was buried in Flanders in Saint Martin's Cathedral in Ypres, as was his explicit wish to be buried on Flemish soil.

    City list. I added a short description for the first dozen cities.
    Spoiler :
    Ghent
    The city flourished from the 11th century on. Its wool industry created the first industrialized zone in Europe. Until the 13th century, Ghent was second in size only to Paris north of the Alps. A rebellious city, Ghent has taken up arms against foreign oppression many times in history.

    Bruges
    Bruges experienced its golden age from the 12th to 15th century and was for a time Europe's chief commercial city. The Bourse, opened in 1309, was most likely the world's first stock market. After its golden age, the city quickly declined due to the silting of the Zwin channel.

    Antwerp
    By the mid 16th century, Antwerp had become the richest city in Europe. Originally the capital of the Dutch revolt, it fell in 1585 and half the population fled to the free north. Antwerp today is the second largest port in Europe and the center of the international diamond trade.

    Leuven
    After having been an important trade center for the duchy of Brabant for centuries, Leuven entered a new golden era with the founding of its university in 1425. Its library, containing a priceless collection, was deliberately destroyed in WWI. Leuven is now home to the world's largest brewery company.

    Mechelen
    Mechelen rose to prominence in the 15th century, when the duke of Burgundy moved several political bodies to the city. It also housed the Supreme Court. During the 16th century, many governmental institutions were moved to Brussels.

    Brussels
    In the 16th century Brussels became the capital of the Low Countries and flourished. From the 11th century until its destruction by fire in 1731, the magnificent Palace of Coudenberg was the seat of government of many illustrious leaders. Today it is the capital of Belgium and the European Union.

    Tournai
    Former capital of the Frankish empire under king Childeric I, and the religious capital of the County of Flanders for over a millennium. Some of the great Flemish Primitives are from Tournai, including Robert Campin and Roger van der Weyden.

    Tongeren
    The oldest city in Flanders. As the capital of a large Roman province, it became an early center of a Christian diocese. The Eburones, the area's original inhabitants, had fiercely resisted the Romans, causing their leader Ambiorix to become a Belgian folk hero in the 19th century.

    Ypres
    Ypres played an important role in the history of the textile industry. The once powerful city was also involved in many battles. It saw intense fighting during WWI, including the first ever employment of chemical warfare. The Last Post is still sounded daily as a tribute to the soldiers who died there.

    Kortrijk
    In the 13th century, Kortrijk gained great importance as a linnen production centre. On July 11, 1302, the Battle of the Golden Spurs between the Flemish and French took place nearby. It resulted in a victory for Flanders, and is now commemorated by a national holiday for the Flemish community.

    Lier
    According to legend, the city was founded by the local Saint Gummarus in the 7th century. Lier has attracted religious orders ever since. In 1496, it witnessed the marriage of Joanna and Philip I of Castile. Their son Charles V, born in Ghent, would become ruler of the Holy Roman Empire.

    Oudenaarde
    Founded along the river Scheldt, it was long situated on the border of France and the Holy Roman Empire. Oudenaarde is famed for constructing the world's first carillon in 1510, starting the tradition of this instrument in Flanders and far beyond.

    Aalst
    Dendermonde
    Vilvoorde
    Sint-Truiden
    Diksmuide
    Nieuwpoort
    Damme
    Ostend
    Dunkirk
    Gravelines
    Cassel
    Roeselare
    Hasselt
    Diest
    Borgloon
    Genk
    Turnhout
    Herentals

    Discussion is hereby encouraged; fellow Flemings please step forward! Walloons and non-Belgians are welcome too of course :D
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Moriboe

    Moriboe Chieftain

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    Now available for G+K thanks to eazyseeker!
     
  3. Comrade Aart

    Comrade Aart Civ1 diplomat

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    Nice. But.....
    Why is Brabant included in the Flemish civ? I know you say it is the Flemish community, but this only existed far later in time (around 1839?). So you project a modern concept (Flemish community) to a medieval past, when Flanders and Brabant were direct rivals? Until very recently Brabanders would never call themselves Flemish!
    Then it would make more sense to include it in the Dutch civ, since Flanders and Brabant were also part of the Union of Utrecht, Willem van Oranje also stayed for a long while in Flanders and the reformation was very much so alife in Flanders. But I can see why you wouldn't do that for a mod. ;)
     
  4. Moriboe

    Moriboe Chieftain

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    You have a good point of course. The (modern) Flemish area could be included in the Dutch civ and in fact, that's what I did for Civ4: made Antwerp the capital and updated the city list (private mod). If I were to release that, nobody would care but a handful of Flemish people. So...

    I made it the "community", which is a cultural bond, much like how the game has ancient Greece and Polynesia, even though they constantly fought amongst each other. The common cultural elements of (historical) Flanders and Brabant are obvious, and were there long before the Flemish Community was institutionalized. After the Eighty Years War that culture also became distinct from Dutch culture. I can see though how non-Flemish still wouldn't care.

    But that's nothing new to you I assume ;)


    P.S. I did take the Union of Utrecht into account and included Tournai in the city list; the only francophone city to join the Union, and with too rich a history (in our region at least) to be missing from the game!
     
  5. Comrade Aart

    Comrade Aart Civ1 diplomat

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    It is funny you made a private mod like that. Normally when I play the Dutch I make The Hague the capital and add Flemish cities. Antwerp would actually make a good Dutch capital if the Dutch revolt would have succeeded fully. The south was far more important than the north in those days after all.
    I wonder if Flemish people would play that private mod of yours. I always get the idea that they hate the idea of being considered "Dutch". There are no real good statistics about it though. Probably because of political incorrectness. (Especially after last Sunday ;) )

    I wish that in the original game they would have picked up the idea of the Union of Utrecht and put Flemish cities in the Dutch list. As a "civilization" or "culture" it would make a lot more sense, but as a nation it wouldn't.
    Interesting fact about Tournai by the way! I didn't know that at all. Also makes sense that you didn't call it "Doornik" then. ;)
     
  6. dashwinner

    dashwinner Chieftain

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    Congratulations on the mod, but I can't help but wonder...

    Wouldn't a Belgian mod have been just as nice? Seems to me, from a broad perspective, like more people would try your mod if it was the whole of belgium , which is already a very small country that not many people know about, instead of flanders.
     
  7. Moriboe

    Moriboe Chieftain

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    Maybe, I could give it a try.

    The leader would be Albert I. Many will recognize Leopold II more, but he is quite notorious due to his exploitation of the Congo Free State, so I won't pick him.

    The UA could be something with big battles, including lots of foreign powers, and foreign occupation. Call it "Battlefield of Europe" :rolleyes:. But I could just take the same as Flanders has now, it still fits. Brussels is also inside the so-called "Flemish Diamond".

    As UU/UB the Belfort can be kept, but both the Béguinage and City Militia are poor choices. Another UB could have something to do with chocolate (not a Swiss monopoly), waffles (though I don't get the fuss about them abroad really) or fries (they are not French!). But the obvious choice would be the Brewery. If you're a beer lover, anywhere in the world, you should know why. Replaces the Theater; maybe 4 happiness at 1 maintenance. Balance is for later.

    The icon could be something inspired by this, though with red instead of yellow:


    And the Flemish don't hate Walloons. OK, some probably do, but they are a minority. We just have chronic disagreements that make me sick of politics. It is true though that most Flemish don't have much of a (Belgian) national feeling, including me, that's why I did a Flanders civ instead. That said, I don't care the least whether it becomes independent or not.
     
  8. janboruta

    janboruta Artistriarch

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    Hello!

    I've started a Flemish game yesterday and it's really fun! The civ is balanced and I like its cultural orientation. I've already picked Oral Tradition for culture from plantations and I'm going create a cultural religion :)

    I am in the process of creating new art for Flanders. Please forgive for including Artois, Hainaut and Limburg on the map, but I really wanted a map that looked cool (and had more counties that were more Flemish/Dutch in the middle ages than today)







    Big version:
    Spoiler :


    Please tell me if you can see all four images. If not, I will have to find another hosting site :)
     
  9. Moriboe

    Moriboe Chieftain

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    I can only see one (the map in spoiler tags) and it looks awesome :eek:

    I will have to rename the civ "The Southern Netherlands" (as you did), but that's no problem. Thank you!

    edit: I can get the images by taking the links from the page source; great work! Robrecht looks much more badass now :goodjob:
     
  10. janboruta

    janboruta Artistriarch

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    You don't have to, this is just the title of the map. :) I just wanted to show more counties that were considered Flemish at that time. I'm working on the rest of art for Flanders at the moment, I will post them later. I won't do the diplo screen, because It's really good! :)

    Here are the rest of the images then.





    small map for game:

     

    Attached Files:

  11. Moriboe

    Moriboe Chieftain

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    I don't know how Walloons would feel about being included in Flanders though :lol:. That mild animosity goes both ways I think.
     
  12. Moriboe

    Moriboe Chieftain

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    Oh a remark about the map: I see all place names are in Dutch, except for Ghent, which is written "Gent" in Dutch. "Duinkerken" is most commonly written without the "-n" at the end, but both are correct (its official name is in French now anyway).
     
  13. janboruta

    janboruta Artistriarch

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    I chose "Ghent" because it's how it is spelled in-game. And it's "Duinkerken" because I felt it looked better on the map ;) I'm not Flemish nor Waloon and so I could focus on history and not on current animosity. Therefore I chose to include Hainaut and Artois on the map, as they were significant for the politics in the region.
     
  14. janboruta

    janboruta Artistriarch

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  15. Moriboe

    Moriboe Chieftain

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    What's not to like? They are nothing short of amazing, thanks! :)
     
  16. GeoModder

    GeoModder Chieftain

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    True enough. :D
    Excellent work from both of you. :goodjob:
     
  17. Moriboe

    Moriboe Chieftain

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    Updated version now available on the mod browser!
     
  18. loreda

    loreda Chieftain

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    can you post it in here? plz!
     
  19. Moriboe

    Moriboe Chieftain

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  20. Bergerperson

    Bergerperson An actual Canadian

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    Is that link for the Gods and Kings, or the Vanilla?
     

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