Today I Learned #3: There's a wiki for everything!

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Takhisis, Dec 27, 2020.

  1. Berzerker

    Berzerker Deity

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    I saw a docu on that, the ship would have likely stayed afloat longer if they hit the berg head on. But they tried to avoid it and ripped out a lengthy section of the side exposing too much of the ship to incoming water.
     
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  2. Berzerker

    Berzerker Deity

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  3. Samson

    Samson Deity

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  4. AmazonQueen

    AmazonQueen Virago

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    In a way it was.
    The captain was overconfident, the ship was designed without enough lifeboats because its designers believed it unsinkable.
    Arrogance was there aplenty.
     
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  5. Valka D'Ur

    Valka D'Ur Hosting Iron Pen in A&E Retired Moderator

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    Yeah, I should ask my aunt sometime about her "missionary" work in Nicaragua.

    She's not happy that her annual trip was derailed due to Covid.

    Just as the Vikings got around, so did the Greeks. And sometimes they met in Constantinople and worked out some deals and agreements.

    Which is why, when I created my SCA persona, it was perfectly in accordance with the rules that my persona could be born in Constantinople and end up in Norway.

    Dual-nationality personas weren't that difficult if you had good sources. It took one of our Shire members years to get his properly accepted, as it was Stoney (native) and Scots. Primary source documentation is required, and when one side of your persona had no written language in that century...

    He did eventually get his name, but then it was yet another argument over his personal heraldic device. Everyone eventually gets into heraldry if they stay past "newcomer stage", and there are some rather strict rules. The device you use cannot be in conflict with anything registered in the mundane world, nor can it conflict with anything previously registered in the SCA (within so many degrees). And then there are some charges that are forbidden, period.

    Swastikas are forbidden, for instance, even though historically they were one of several dozens of varieties of the basic cross. Charges used in public service organizations are also forbidden.

    And then there's the hypocrisy of religious symbols being forbidden, which is how my SCA colleague finally got the heraldic device he wanted. He chose (if memory serves) buffalo hoof prints, but was denied because they were "totem" animals, therefore a religious symbol, and therefore forbidden. So they were sent an answer stating that the hoof prints were hoof prints, and demanded an explanation since all those dozens of crosses were religious symbols, yet they were allowed.

    The answer came back that amounted to "That's different."

    Well, this situation dragged on for YEARS. I don't recall what the tipping point was... maybe all it took was a changeover in the highestmost level of the office overseeing naming and heraldic devices (this issue had been kicked up from shire to principality to Kingdom and higher, back and forth, for years, with the answer always being either "NO" or "maybe if you'd change this/that/the other"... seems that someone Up At That Level either didn't understand native American heraldry (it's a real historical thing), or more likely didn't consider it valid, being a North American charge.

    But our Shire had been set up from the get-go as a New World Shire, so we could include and incorporate elements of all three continents, in our names, devices, feast themes, art, and so on.

    And some paper-pusher in California didn't like that.

    Well, it was finally resolved, and hopefully Bod-level officers never gave anyone else that level of BS.

    Yes, it was a tragedy, yes, the captain and his crew were white, and yes, they were arrogant, naive, trusting, inattentive, stupid, slow, overconfident, and not even remotely thinking with any common sense.

    All of that is true at the same time.

    How could it be unexpected?

    They were in the North Atlantic. Icebergs happen there. It's like saying you weren't expecting to run across black ice in a snowstorm on a Prairie highway in the winter.

    That's why there are so many accidents on the road between Edmonton and Calgary. Motorists are like the Titanic captain, who venture out unprepared for the worst that can happen.

    My grandmother was prepared to the point that she insisted I bring my winter coat along on our holidays in BC, "in case it snows in the mountains."

    We took these trips in June or July. But yeah, I have to admit that I've seen it snowing in Rogers Pass in July. It wasn't enough to need the coat, but my grandmother was proud of herself for being prepared.

    Fast-forward some decades... she would have been happy to have been proved right, as there's been snow in Canmore in August for the past 2-3 winters.
     
  6. EgonSpengler

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    TIL about Miles Copeland, Jr. a co-founder of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, and an important figure in the post-War American conservative movement. He was a pupil of James Burnham, he wrote for The National Review, and was 'on the ground' - perhaps even key - in the U.S. efforts to shape the Middle East in the 1950s.
    So he's a strong candidate for my personal "Rogues Gallery" of supervillains. :lol:

    Here's the twist: His children became titans of the arts, not just in the United States, but globally. His daughter Lorraine was a movie producer; his son Ian was a music promoter and booking agent; his son Stuart was the drummer for The Police; and his son Miles III co-founded IRS Records (which, imho, might make him more important in the history of rock n' roll* than his brother Stuart).




    * An incomplete list of bands signed by IRS Records
    Spoiler :
    The Alarm
    The Bangles
    Berlin
    Black Sabbath
    The Buzzcocks
    The Cramps
    The Damned
    Dead Kennedys
    The English Beat
    The Fall
    Fine Young Cannibals
    General Public
    The Go-Go's
    Gary Numan
    Oingo Boingo
    R.E.M.
    The Stranglers
    Wall of Voodoo
     
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  7. Samson

    Samson Deity

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    So he has seen first hand what externally backed revolutions lead to in Syria and Iran, and still things the US does not do enough of it, and people still listen to what he has to say?
     
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  8. EgonSpengler

    EgonSpengler Deity

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    He passed away in '91, so he hadn't seen the full bloom of what he helped bring upon the world. Nevertheless, as of 1986, which was after the Islamic Revolution in Iran, I guess he felt the US didn't oust more people like Mossadegh. I don't know what he thought of Hosni Mubarak, Hafez al-Assad, or Saddam Hussein, and I don't know if he could have had a fully-formed opinion on the nascent Hezbollah yet.

    As for how well-regarded he is today, I have no clue. I'd never heard of him before this morning, but I'm not really tuned into the conservative wavelength, so if he's "required reading" I wouldn't necessarily know it. I am curious what some conservative intellectuals might make of his legacy today. Just the title of Rich Lowry's recent book - The Case for Nationalism: How It Made Us Powerful, United, and Free - might lead us to expect him to at least be forgiving of Copeland Jr. and his generation, if not full of praise for them. (Full disclosure, I haven't read Lowry's book, I've only heard him speaking about it and defending his thesis in brief, easily-digestible radio segments.)

    But, yeah, based on what little I've learned of Copeland, Jr. so far, he may be a strong addition to my personal "Rogues Gallery." (For those who don't read comic books, a "Rogues Gallery" is the collection of villains associated with a particular protagonist.)
     
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  9. haroon

    haroon Deity

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    According to this article that based itself from an academic journal, it's concluded that saffron actually good for anticipating, battling covid, even for post-covid recovery.

    This is because it's for a long time use to cure ailment that are in essential covid symptoms like: influenza (cold), respiratory problem, fever and most importantly it helps boost the immune system. Beside that, saffron also has anti-depressant property and use to treat sleep depravity, anxiety, etc.

    The recommended dosage is around 30-50 mg/day, consumption from 5 gram above can be toxic and case adverse effect.
     
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  10. Samson

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    That is really interesting, another protease inhibitor: It was elucidated that crocin and crocetin possess a high binding affinity towards the main protease of SARS-CoV-2. And there is a really long list of things it is good for, generally mental health. It would be the most expensive food stuff that is good for us wouldn't it.
     
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  11. haroon

    haroon Deity

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    I have in my hand 40 gram Turkish saffron, if only I can send 5 gram of it for you, you are a nice guy, you deserve it ;)
     

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  12. Samson

    Samson Deity

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    I tend to use tumeric in place of saffron, and that is also supposed to be a superfood.
     
  13. Valka D'Ur

    Valka D'Ur Hosting Iron Pen in A&E Retired Moderator

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    I remember one time when we were doing a medieval feast and one recipe called for saffron. We debated back and forth whether to spend the $$ on it, as it was insanely expensive.
     
  14. Takhisis

    Takhisis Rum and coke.

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    Saffron is, also, insanely delicious.
     
  15. Sofista

    Sofista Deity

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    Stuart Copeland's father. 'Nuff said. Even if he'd been the literal Demolition Man.
     
  16. Birdjaguar

    Birdjaguar Hanafubuki Super Moderator Supporter

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    Saffron comes from a crocus plant. The bulbs can be planted in pots and they will flower every spring and yield 3 tiny strands from each bloom. We grew it in a flowerbed when we lived in NC.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saffron
     
  17. Farm Boy

    Farm Boy The long wait

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    Saffron is expensive. The value is earned!
     
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  18. shadowplay

    shadowplay your ad here

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    Not sure I know what it even tastes like. :undecide:
     
  19. Farm Boy

    Farm Boy The long wait

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    If you ever find yourself so far west you wonder where society has gone... I'll buy you a plate of rice.

    Cheaper tho to prepare than travel, a very little bit goes a long way, it might be worth a splurge. It goes on rice. The basic caloric staple of the world thus becomes a luxury.

    I am struggling with cooking. But I managed to combine rice, frozen peas, salt, and egg today. If I can do it, you surely can.
     
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  20. Josu

    Josu Emperor

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    TIL that in Mexico there is a mascot to encourage vaccination, it's a panda and its name is Pandemio

     
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