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Translation of the leaders' speeches

Discussion in 'Civ5 - General Discussions' started by spicytimothy, Jun 11, 2010.

  1. thelibra

    thelibra Future World Dictator

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    Indeed. Especially since Washington himself was born and raised in England and didn't even come to America until he was already an officer in the British Army.
     
  2. Ahriman

    Ahriman Tyrant

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  3. The Kingmaker

    The Kingmaker Alexander

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    Shouldn't Darius refer to himself as "shahanshah" instead of "malik?" Not that I'm an expert on Old Persian/Farsi or anything. :(
     
  4. astrognash

    astrognash TXT_KEY_CUSTOM_USER_TITLE

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    This flatly contradicts everything I've ever been told about him, as well as everything I've ever read about him.
     
  5. lifelessgamer

    lifelessgamer Chieftain

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    Does anyone here wanna try to find Siam? I've tried everything I can think of but no luck so far. I bet the name was misspelled or has a number at the end.

    On another note: Its nice of people to join mostly to tell us the proper translation
     
  6. Bastian-Bux

    Bastian-Bux King

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    Hint about the russian empress: if you want to write her in latin letters you should write: Jekaterina Alexejewna. Or you could call her by her name she was (first) baptized with: Sophie Auguste Friederike von Anhalt-Zerbst-Dornburg. ;)
     
  7. Ituralde

    Ituralde Warlord

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    I wondered about Catherine myself. Would she be speaking Russian fluently? Should she have a German accent? Not that it matters much to me, just out of curiosity.
     
  8. Nicolas10

    Nicolas10 Warlord

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    Well, just as George Washington should be speaking in some sort of British accent, I'm pretty sure that Catherine spoke French in her court... She certainly wrote in French, publishing ideas and literature and corresponding with Voltaire and the like.

    That said, she certainly could speak Russian, and I think a St. Petersburg, aristocratic accent would be ideal, given that as the "Russian" civ, she needs to sound like a Slav, rather than a Western European.
     
  9. ShiroKobbure

    ShiroKobbure Still modding Civ3

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    Its very disappointing Ramsses is speaking Arabic.
    I hope they find someone who speaks at least coptic, if not an older version of the language. Having Ramsses II speaking Arabic, would be like Montezuma speaking Spanish execpt Ramsses about 2000 years before Arabic was spoken in the region.
     
  10. Krzowwh

    Krzowwh King

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  11. Buccaneer

    Buccaneer Deity

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    I, too, am very disappointed about Rameses. Enough is known linguistically about Ancient Eygptian to at least piece together a simple greeting.
     
  12. astrognash

    astrognash TXT_KEY_CUSTOM_USER_TITLE

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    Yes, but it's my understanding that they will be saying much more than just greetings.
     
  13. ShiroKobbure

    ShiroKobbure Still modding Civ3

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    We can read ancient Egyptian, their stories and trade agreements, so the pronunciation may not be 100% right (who would know though) they could still make him say almost anything they want, if they do the research.
    Also some people speak Coptic, the final evolution of the language. I think Coptic would be a much better choice than Arabic.
     
  14. Buccaneer

    Buccaneer Deity

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    I think that's a good point, the pronounciation, syntax and grammar does not have to be close for an ancient language - but an anachronistic language (like a pharoah speaking Arabic) should NOT be used.
     
  15. supersoulty

    supersoulty Chieftain

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    I realize I am very late getting in on this one, but...

    This is one of the more annoying aspects of watching historical pieces, for those who are more familiar with the history of the English language, and linguistics in general. People assume that since Britain is the parent country, obviously the people who came directly from there, in the early days, sounded what we think of as British. Not true. In fact, the British people of that era would have sounded closer to what we think of as "American". Many of the British dialects that we have today didn't even exist prior to the 19th century. In addition to that, if you have one group of people who branch out from the main group, as American settlers did from the British, and then from each other, it is actually the manner of the English (in this case) spoken by the splinter group that tends to change the least. This is because spoken language is under the constant influence of various factors, and thus in a constant state of flux, while a splinter group that manages to hang onto their language is usually under far less influence, because they are generally isolated by various factors.

    So, indeed, the Americans of that era would have sounded perfectly "American" to us, while the British... also would have sounded pretty "American," for the most part. British pronounciations then continued to change in Britain, as people moved around alot... and some other things happens as well, that are both unusual in the broad history of languages, and which I won't get into, but if you are interested, look up the "Received Pronunciation", and these things gave British English its particular sounds. While, in the United States and Canada, there were changes, and in some dialect regions, major shifts, but for the most part, English here as maintained more of its original character from the people who first came here. For an example of media that actually gets it right, watch the John Adams miniseries.
     
  16. Morningcalm

    Morningcalm Keeper of Records

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