UK Politics - BoJo and chums

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Samson, Oct 29, 2021.

  1. really

    really Deity

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    I'm liking that Mick Lynch from the RMT Union.
    He'll be on Question Time (edit tomorrow)
    I might even tune in.
    I've only ever really watched it a few times for Northern Ireland or brexit issues.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2022
  2. Takhisis

    Takhisis Rum and coke.

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    up yours.
    And not just by means of this particular silly law.

    Brexit will keep wages down and make UK poorer in decade ahead, study finds
    Real pay set to be £470 lower per worker each year, say top economists
    By Adam Forrest
    Spoiler :
    Brexit will damage Britain’s competitiveness, hit productivity and dampen workers’ wages for the rest of the decade, according to a damning new study.

    The Resolution Foundation think tank’s report, in collaboration with the London School of Economics, said quitting the EU would make Britain “poorer” during the 2020s.

    The study said the immediate impact of Brexit was already clear, with a “depreciation-driven inflation spike” increasing the cost of living for households and cutting investment.

    The research estimated that labour productivity will be reduced by 1.3 per cent by the end of the decade through changes in trading rules, contributing to weaker wage growth.

    The economists said real pay was set to be £470 lower per worker each year, on average, than it would have been if Britain had opted to stay inside the EU.

    Output of the UK fishing industry is expected to decline by 30 per cent and some workers will face “painful adjustments” in the decade ahead, said the Resolution Foundation.

    The report also added that the northeast of England – part of the red wall Boris Johnson’s Conservatives were able to turn blue at the last election – is expected to be hit hardest by Brexit, since its firms are particularly reliant on exports to the EU.

    The UK may not have seen a large relative slump in its exports to the EU that some predicted many predicted but imports from the EU have fallen more swiftly than those from the rest of the world, the study suggested.

    The report said Britain had experienced a decline of 8 per cent in “trade openness” – trade as a share of economic output – since 2019, losing market share across three of its largest non-EU goods import markets in 2021, the US, Canada and Japan.

    The full effect of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) struck with the EU will take years to be felt, say the authors, but it is clear the nation is moving towards a more closed economy.

    Sophie Hale, principal economist at the Resolution Foundation, said Brexit represented “the biggest change to Britain’s economic relationship with the rest of the world in half a century”.

    She said: “This has led many to predict that it would cause a particularly big fall in exports to the EU, and fundamentally reshape Britain’s economy towards more manufacturing.”

    “The first of these has not come to pass, and the second looks unlikely to do so,” the economist added.

    “Instead, Brexit has had a more diffuse impact by reducing the UK’s competitiveness and openness to trade with a wider range of countries. This will ultimately reduce productivity, and workers’ real wages too.”

    It follows a recent study by the Centre for European Reform (CEF) which found Brexit was “largely to blame” for billions being lost in trade and tax revenues in recent years.

    The think tank said that by the end of last year, Britain’s economy was 5.2 per cent – or £31bn – smaller than it would have been without Brexit and the Covid pandemic.

    “We can’t blame Brexit for all of the 5.2 per cent GDP shortfall … but it’s apparent that Brexit is largely to blame,” said John Springford, author of the CEF study.

    It comes as Mr Johnson’s government was accused of hypocrisy for planning to cut controls on City bosses’ pay while calling for wage restraint in the public sector.

    No 10 chief of staff Steve Barclay is said to have written to chancellor Rishi Sunak with a plan for “deregulatory measures to reduce the overall burden on business” and attract companies following Brexit.

    Confirming the plan, Downing Street said the government was exploring how non-executive directors were paid, not how much – including removing “unnecessary restrictions on paying non-executive directors shares”.

    But Labour accused the government of using “two sets of rules” on wages – one for people on high incomes in the City, and another for workers elsewhere.
     
  3. EnglishEdward

    EnglishEdward Deity

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    Decided to have a look at it:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Court_of_Human_Rights

    Some interesting text there:

     
  4. Arakhor

    Arakhor Dremora Courtier Super Moderator

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    Don't worry. Jacob Rees-Mogg has been on hand to dismiss this as a new rendition of Project Fear.
     
  5. innonimatu

    innonimatu the resident Cassandra

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    An important piece by Craig Murray. Putting a link on UK politics but could go in other threads. The UK (or Scotland) is not the only place with this issue. The abuse of prison as a mere repression tool against those regarded as marginals.
     
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  6. Arakhor

    Arakhor Dremora Courtier Super Moderator

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  7. Arakhor

    Arakhor Dremora Courtier Super Moderator

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    Here's further circumstantial evidence that the Govt is deliberately provoking the strikes:

    upload_2022-6-23_14-46-1.png
     
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  8. Samson

    Samson Deity

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    I wonder why they want to pay the staff less?

    Rail firms paid shareholders £800m before asking workers to take pay cut
    CEOs of the six biggest train companies also took home a combined salary of more than £5m in 2020​
     
  9. Takhisis

    Takhisis Rum and coke.

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    up yours.
    I'm sure that it's the EU's fault.
     
  10. Samson

    Samson Deity

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    Tories routed in by-elections

    In Tiverton and Honiton, where former MP Neil Parish quit after he was found watching pornography in the House of Commons, the Lib Dems took 22,537 votes, beating the Conservatives by 6,144.
    At the last general election, the Tories had a 24,239 majority in the mostly rural constituency. It was the biggest majority lost at a by-election ever and the swing was the 12th largest ever in a by-election.

    In Wakefield, where a Labour victory had been largely expected, the party's candidate, Simon Lightwood, won by 4,925 votes.
    The previous MP, Imran Ahmad, resigned after being convicted of sexually assaulting a 15-year-old boy.

    Conservative co-chair Oliver Dowden has resigned, in a letter to Mr Johnson, he wrote: "We cannot carry on with business as usual. Somebody must take responsibility and I have concluded that, in these circumstances, it would not be right for me to remain in office."​
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2022
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  11. sherbz

    sherbz Deity

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    Im not sure the Labour victory is big enough. Dont get me wrong, im pleased at both. But Wakefield is no way near as impressive as the Liberals victory in Tiverton. Maybe we might be on our way to a hung parliament, with Labour rebuilding a bit of that red wall, the liberals pulling down a lot of the blue wall in the south, and the tories being reduced to a rump of home counties.
     
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  12. Samson

    Samson Deity

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    It is certainly not a slam dunk for Labour, but Wakefield was a very different election to Tiverton. These are the vote counts over time for the 2, it seems to me that Wakefield was more fragmented, as by-elections usually are, whereas Tiverton people really got behind the Lib Dems.

    Spoiler Votes over time Note different timescales :

    Wakefield

    Tiverton and Honiton
     
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  13. Aiken_Drumn

    Aiken_Drumn Emperor

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    A three way where lib/lab come to power would be a nice change of pace.
     
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  14. EnglishEdward

    EnglishEdward Deity

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    I like that. It is an absolutely masterful statement.

    In both these elections, the previous conservative incumbent had disgraced himself;
    so it is difficult to quantify the extent it was due to that and due to the Boris government.

    In my mind, the real test for the Boris Johnson government will be if there is a
    by election for other reasons such as the unexpected death of a sitting MP.
     
  15. Aiken_Drumn

    Aiken_Drumn Emperor

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    Any roachy old cons looking closer to death than usual?
     
  16. sherbz

    sherbz Deity

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    Although i agree, im not quite sure how it would work. I dont think the Liberals will be too keen on a coalition after last time. Maybe some sort of confidence and supply arrangement. And if i were Ed Davey i would make it conditional on constitutional reform with full Labour support.
     
  17. Samson

    Samson Deity

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    I had to look. Someone asked for the list of MPs with age and they said they do not know. Interestingly a greater proportion of Labour MPs are over 70 than Tories.
    Spoiler Age by party and time :
    Party Total MPs 18-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ Not known
    CON 365 3% 16% 30% 31% 13% 3% 4%
    LAB 202 3% 16% 25% 28% 21% 4% 2%
    SNP 47 6% 19% 28% 28% 15% 2% 2%
    LD 11 0% 18% 36% 36% 9% 0% 0%
    Other 25 8% 20% 20% 24% 28% 0% 0%
    Total 650 3% 17% 28% 30% 16% 3% 3%
    Verified information about age is not available for 101 MPs, mostly those first elected at the 2019 General. From here, I do not know how 101 MPs can equal 3% of 650.

     
  18. EnglishEdward

    EnglishEdward Deity

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    I don't know.

    There is a nasty sneaky part of me which imagines there is a psychopathic/sociopathic
    person in conservative central office that is wondering which conservative dissident they
    might bump off, to prove that the conservatives can still win a by election under Boris.
     
  19. uppi

    uppi Deity

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    Looks very much like successful tactical voting in Tiverton
     
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  20. Arakhor

    Arakhor Dremora Courtier Super Moderator

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    So, it's been 31 years since the Tories lost two by-elections on the same night and have just suffered the worst ever by-election defeat in Tiverton. Maybe the writing is finally on the wall for these feckless scheisters.
     

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