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Unique Great People

Discussion in 'Civ4 - European Middle Ages Mod' started by Head Serf, Jun 3, 2007.

  1. Head Serf

    Head Serf Emperor

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    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    As many of you know, a few months ago we began adding unique great people to this mod based on region. Over the course of the next few months, I'd like to complete that small project. Each great person list should have as a minimum 5 names with 3 more names for each additional civilization beyond the first on the list. If people could post names or lists of people they know to be important from the middle ages, with the years they were alive, it would be much appreciated. Here is the list of what the different regions are and how much work has been done so far in each (group name is bolded with the civilizations included below):

    Central Catholic Nations (saints done)
    France
    Italy
    Papal States
    Venice
    Crusaders

    Iberian Catholic Nations
    Spain
    Portugal

    North Catholic Nations
    Germany
    Poland

    British Isles and Nearby Catholic Nations (Saints done)
    England
    Wales
    Scotland
    Normandy
    Ireland

    Byzantine Orthodox Nations
    Byzantium

    Eastern Orthodox Nations
    Russia
    Hungary
    Slavs
    Bulgars

    Pagan Northern Nations
    Goths
    Vikings
    Lithuania
    Saxony

    Roman Nations
    Roman Empire

    Eastern Christian Nations (Nobles done)
    Armenia

    Asian Steppe Nations
    Mongols
    Khazars
    Tatars
    Persia

    Muslim Nations (Saints, Nobles done)
    Arabia
    Egypt
    Moors
    Turks

    This adds up to 11 groups with 5 people each, for a total of 55 lists. Remember, the groups needed are Saints (Great Prophets), Philosophers (Great Scientists), Nobles (Great Artists), Great Engineers, and Great Merchants. Nobles should include lesser nobles, monarchs, magnates, dukes, etc.
     
  2. Iuvavus

    Iuvavus Marcomanni Exile

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    Location:
    Iuvavum, Roman Province Noricum
    As Graet Artists are replaced by Nobles, does that mean, that there will be no Great Artist unit?
     
  3. Ajidica

    Ajidica High Quality Person

    Joined:
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    21,172
    yes, no great artists.
     
  4. Drachenfyre

    Drachenfyre Chieftain

    Joined:
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    Here are some names from a Welsh perspecitive:


    Nobles (Great Artists)

    Owain ap Gruffydd, aka Owain Gwynedd (Owain of Gwynedd), Owain I of Wales . (c. 1100–November 28, 1170. Was a formadable ruler of Gwynedd and proclaimed King of Wales after a famous battle. He fought against Stephen the Usurper of England and against Henry II (Henry FitzEmpress) of England to extend Wales' borders further eastwards. Of his many sons, Madoc appearently discovered America centuries before the Vikings arrived.

    Gwenllian ferch Gruffydd, (c. 1101 - 1136), was Princess of Deheubarth by marriage and a princess of Gwenydd by birth. She was the eldest daugher of Prince Gruffydd ap Cynan of Gwynedd and sister to Owain Gwynedd (see above). Gwenllian was married to the Prince of Deheubarth. She led an army against English forces entrenched in Cydweli in 1136. Ultimatly uncessful, she has been hailed as the Welsh Boadicea. After the battle she was beheaded. I feel it is important to have a female personal as well, so her inclusion would be positive.

    Llywelyn Fawr (Llywelyn the Great), aka Llywelyn ab Iorwerth, and Llywelyn I of Wales. (c. 1173 – April 11, 1240). Llywelyn united most of Wales under his rule and received the fealty of other Welsh lords in 1216 at the treaty of Aberdyfi, in effect becoming the first Welsh Prince of Wales (a fact later recognized by Henry III's regency council)

    Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, also known as Llywelyn Ein Llyw Olaf (Llywelyn Our Last Leader) and Llywelyn II of Wales. c. 1223 – December 11, 1282. Rebuilt the kingdom of his grandfather Llywelyn Fwar, contributed much to Welsh laws. Ultamatly Llywelyn's War of Welsh Independence was defeated by Edward I of England (of Braveheart fame)... though at great cost to the England.

    Owain Glyndŵr, aka Owain IV of Wales, (1359–c. 1416) Owain was decended from the Mathrafal Lords of Powys on his mother's side, and decendent from the Deheubarth princes on his father's side. So when he led the rebellion of 1401-1416 he was proclaimed Prince of Wales by the Senedd (Parliament) of Welsh lords. Ultimatly his rebellion was unsuccessful and his body was never discovered, his revolt marked the last attempt by warfare for Welsh independence.


    Philosophers (Great Scientists),

    Sulien of Llanbadarn (b.c. 1030). Sulien of Llanbadarn wrote many sagas and became Bishop of St. David's in 1073.

    Rhygyfarch ap Sulien (also known as Ricemarch) of Llanbadarn wrote the "Life of St. David"

    Ieuan ap Sulien of Llanbadarn was a skillful calligrapher and copyist of the works of Augustine of Hippo.


    Great Engineers

    *still researching

    Great Merchants

    *still researching
     
  5. Drachenfyre

    Drachenfyre Chieftain

    Joined:
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    Central Catholic Nations (saints done)
    France
    Italy
    Papal States
    Venice
    Crusaders

    *Mahap you could add the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem? Or is the Crusaders the Kingdom of Jerusalem?

    Kingdom of Jerusalem:

    Nobles:

    Baldwin II de Bourcq, aka Baldwin II de Jérusalem (c 1070- died August 21, 1131) second king of Jerusalem, elected to the kingship on the death of his cousin. He defended the recently established kingdom against Egypt and Syria, and took the bold step in recognizing his daughter Melisende as his legal heir, which may have inspiried Henry I of England to designate Maude as his own heir. (Though Queen Urraca of Castille was crowned Queen in 1109, on the death of her father. This may have also inspired them to designate daugters to succeed them).

    William of Tyre described Baldwin as "a devout and God-fearing man, notable for his loyalty and for his great experience in military matters," and said that he was nicknamed "the Thorny" (cognominatus est Aculeus). Ibn al-Qalanisi, who calls him "Baldwin the Little" (Baghdawin al-ru'aiuis) to distinguish him from Baldwin I, remarked that "after him there was none left amongst them possessed of sound judgment and capacity to govern." Melisende, by law the heir to the kingdom, succeeded her father with Fulk as her consort. The new queen and king were crowned on September 14.


    Mélisende de Bourcq
    , aka Mélisende de Jérusalem, (1105 – September 11, 1161), eldest daugter of King Baldwin II. Baldwin II raised his daughter to be his successor and she is known to have been well educated (some rival courtiers misunderstood her forthright nature). For the first five years after she became queen her husband belittled her legal authority in public and accused her of infedility with her cosin. She reasserted her legal authority in a palice coup and William of Tyre wrote that Fulk "did not attempt to take the initiative, even in trivial matters, without [Melisende's] knowledge". She is known to have founded a convent and given much to the Latin Chruch of Jerusalem, and funded the creation of the Melisende Psalter. Also, she sponsored many building projects in Jerusalem itelself.

    William of Tyre, writing on Melisende's 30-year reign, wrote that "she was a very wise woman, fully experienced in almost all affairs of state business, who completely triumphed over the handicap of her sex so she could take charge of important affairs...", and "striving to emulate the glory of the best princes, Melisende ruled the kingdom with such ability that she was rightly considered to have equalled her predecessors in that regard.

    Baldwin III d'Anjou, aka Baldwin III de Jérusalem, (1130 – February 10, 1162 died in battle) Baldwin III was the eldest son of Queen Melisende, Baldwin and was an effective military commander for Jerusalem. Around 1150 Baldwin refortified Gaza to place some pressure on the nearby Egyptian outpost of Ascalon, and in 1153 Baldwin successfully besieged and captured Ascalon itself. Through-out his rule he led campaigns in Syria and Egypt. He also spent much of his spare time reading history and was knowledgeable in the jus consuetudinarium of the kingdom, and is further descibed as friendly to people of all classes, and "voluntarily offered an opportunity of conversing with him to anyone who wished it or whom he casually met. If an audience was requested, he did not refuse it."


    Baldwin IV d'Anjou aka Baldwin IV de Jérusalem, and Baldwin the Leper, (1161 – 1185), son of King Amelric I de Jérusalem and nephew of Baldwin III, grandson of Queen Mélisende. Baldwin often overcame his deteriorating handicap of lepersy and was a source of insperation for the kingdom. A fictionalised version of Baldwin is played by Edward Norton in the 2005 movie Kingdom of Heaven. This portrayal succeeds in conveying his physical courage and dedication to his kingdom.

    Philosophers (Great Scientists),

    William of Tyre (c. 1130 – 1185) was archbishop of Tyre and a chronicler of the Crusades and the Middle Ages. William himself reports that he wrote an account of the Lateran Council which he attended, as well as a Historia or Gesta orientalium principum dealing with the history of the Holy Land from time of Muhammad until 1184. However, neither of these works have survived.

    His great work is a chronicle of twenty-three unfinished books. The work begins with the conquest of Syria by Umar, but most of it deals with the advent of the First Crusade and the subsequent political history of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Although he used older works, including chronicles of the First Crusade such as Fulcher of Chartres and other, unnamed sources, the work is also valuable as a primary source itself. It was widely translated and circulated throughout Europe after William's death. James of Vitry and Matthew Paris had copies of it and used it in their own chronicles. A translation into Old French was particularly well-circulated and had many anonymous additions made to it in the 13th century, including the so-called chronicle of Ernoul; one Renaissance author translated the Old French version back into Latin, unaware that a Latin original already existed. A Middle English translation of the Old French version was made by William Caxton in the 15th century
     
  6. Head Serf

    Head Serf Emperor

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    Wow! Thanks for all the names! These will really help get the list filled out.

    Yea, the Crusaders are the Kingdom of Jerusalem, Antioch, etc.
     
  7. Drachenfyre

    Drachenfyre Chieftain

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    Well, it would be a matter of conjecture then if my list would apply for all of the Crusader states. Though, the list could apply for the Crusader States in the Outremer.

    If you think on it, maybe the Crusader civ could be renamed Crusader States, or maybe better would be Outremer Empire? IDK. Outremer, French (outre-mer) for "overseas", was the general name given the Crusader states established after the First Crusade: the County of Edessa, the Principality of Antioch, the County of Tripoli and especially the Kingdom of Jerusalem. The name was often used as an equivalent to Levant, Syria or Palestine, and incorporated areas that are today also part of Israel, Jordan, and Lebanon.

    Well, before he was elected king, Baldwin II was also the second count of the Crusader State of the County of Edessa, so in effect he could serve for both of those states.

    While he designated his eldest daughter Melisende to succeed him in the Kingdom of Jerusalem, he married his second daughter Alice to Bohemond II of Antioch, and their only chiled was a daughter- Constance, hereditary Princess of Antioch. Constance was then married to Raymond of Poitiers (Eleanor of Aquitaine's uncle and alleged lover). But he successfully defended Antioch against both the Byzantine empire and Syria before he was killed in mattle. Later, Princess Constance married Raynald de Châtillon. After the princess' death, Raynald de Châtillon married the countess of Kerek, and is best remembered in history as the one who "harrassed trade caravans" between Egypt and Syria, and who instigated Saladin's invasion of Jerusalem (though he was planning that all along). Princess Constance was succeded by her son by her first husband Bohemond III of Antioch.

    So to the list, you could add more names such as

    Constance d'Antioche
    Bohémond d'Antioche
    Raymond d'Aquitaine
    Raynald de Châtillon


    There is also Raymond of Tripoli too to add, and so many others! Lol. I dont know where to stop!
     

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