Ventura calls for Selig's indictment

Is there a double standard at work here?

  • No, both were treated appropriately according to their offenses

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    20

Masquerouge

Deity
Joined
Jun 3, 2002
Messages
17,790
Location
Mountain View, CA
Background: Ventura is a former WWF wrestler, and former governor of Minnesota, who admitted to taking steroids. Bud Selig is Major League Baseball's commissioner.

http://msn.foxsports.com/mlb/story/9229144/Report:-Ventura-calls-for-Selig's-indictment?MSNHPHMA

Ventura said:

"In the early '90s, the federal government came into pro wrestling and tried to put (WWE Chairman) Vince McMahon in prison for steroid use of wrestlers," Ventura told NBC's affiliate in Denver. "My question is: They've now determined 104 baseball players failed their steroid test in 2003 — 104. They indicted Vince McMahon, why aren't they indicting Bud Selig? He's the head of baseball, it happened on his watch."


In 1993, McMahon, who was CEO at the time, was indicted amid wrestling's steroid controversy. In 1994, he was put on trial, accused of distributing steroids. He was found not guilty.
"What you have here is two sets of law enforcement," Ventura told the TV station. "One set: 'Oh, pro wrestling, let's go after the head of that and put him in prison for steroid use.' And pro wrestling is not even an athletic competition. We went to court and said we're sports entertainment. Here, you have a legitimate athletic competition with 104 guys using illegal drugs — cheating — and where's the indictment of Bud Selig on this?


So... Do you think Ventura has a point? Is there a double standard here?


I think yes. MLB has much more clout, and does not have the derisive status that WWF has in the eyes of many - as such, it's easier to go after people calling themselves entertainers (BOOOOOOOOOOOO), than go after America's Favorite Sport (cue patriotic anthem, raise flag, put hand on heart, shed a tear, call dissenters terrorists).


Poll is coming.
 

downtown

Crafternoon Delight
Joined
Jun 11, 2004
Messages
19,541
Location
Chicago
Selig ought to be thrown in prison for ruining baseball (and he did that without steroids).

Venture is on to something here though. He's one guy who has escaped a lot of scrutiny, when a lot of this scandal is his own damn fault.
 

mrt144

Deity
Joined
Jan 27, 2007
Messages
11,121
Location
Seattle
I think it's funny how the two resident Mormons replied to this thread though.
 

Aegis

Deity
Joined
Jan 27, 2005
Messages
3,970
Ventura was also a Navy SEAL and was Governor of Minnesota. He wasn't just some Wrestler.
 

Masquerouge

Deity
Joined
Jun 3, 2002
Messages
17,790
Location
Mountain View, CA
Allright, I'll edit my post to point out he was governor. I tried to keep the OP simple, and I don't think it's that relevant to the story, other that giving Ventura a bit more clout I guess, but hey :) Even if he hadn't been governor, he still would have been right.
 

Cutlass

The Man Who Wasn't There.
Joined
Jan 13, 2008
Messages
47,494
Location
US of A
While he has a point that baseball, and other sports, should receive more scrutiny concerning their tolerance for players using drugs, I don't think there's any inherent reason to think Selig distributed the drugs. Tolerated, yes, and that should have it's own penalties.
 

Masquerouge

Deity
Joined
Jun 3, 2002
Messages
17,790
Location
Mountain View, CA
Selig has a lot of culpability, but to compare him to McMahon, who was basically dealing, is stupid.

But he does point out that WWE was just entertainement, not a pro athlete league, while the MLB is a pro league.

So, no on prison, but he should've been canned a decade ago.

I guess it depends on how responsible the head of a major league is for what's going on in his/her (ok, his) league.
 

illram

Deity
Retired Moderator
Joined
Dec 25, 2005
Messages
9,218
Location
San Francisco
I have a feeling that if people dug deeper into the MLB and Selig, especially during the McGwire/Sosa years when Baseball was trying to make a popular resurgence, some pretty damning facts would come to light.

Selig is a liar who looked the other way when athletes were juicing and hitting tons of home runs and putting MLB back in the national spotlight. Then Bonds comes along and he gets all super vigilant and acts surprised, like he had no idea what was going on. Yeah right.

This piece from the SF Examiner kind of sums up how I feel:

Spoiler :
SAN FRANCISCO – The news that Alex Rodriguez tested positive for steroids in 2003 is another example of the hypocrisy that surrounds baseball’s Steroids Era.

That hypocrisy starts at the top. Commissioner Bud Selig claims he hadn’t heard of steroids in baseball until 1998. Apparently, he can’t read because 10 years earlier, Thomas Boswell had written a broadly distributed column in The Washington Post identifying Jose Canseco as a steroids user. In the playoffs that year, Boston Red Sox fans chanted, “Ster-oids, ster-oids,” at Canseco.
Jose just smiled and flexed his muscles — and hit three home runs in a four-game A’s sweep.

Selig didn’t want to know because home runs — caused by a combination of steroids, smaller parks, juiced baseballs and overexpansion — saved baseball after a crippling strike in 1994 that wiped out the World Series. Fans were flocking to the ballparks to see the power displays, especially the great race in 1998 by Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa, as McGwire set the single-season home run record with 70.

Three years later, Barry Bonds blasted past McGwire’s record with 73 homers, and Bonds was suddenly demonized by the media, as if he were the only one getting chemical help.

Throughout this period, I have been in regular contact with managers, executives, players and scouts. Then and now, I have heard the whispers about widespread steroids use.

It isn’t just hitters, of course. Pitchers have benefited, too. Suddenly, there were several pitchers throwing 100 mph fastballs. Hmmm. Roger Clemens had a stretch, starting when he was 31, when his career seemed to flatten out, as he won just 40 games in four years. The next two years, he won 21 and 20, with strikeout levels similar to what he had early in his career. Double hmmm.

But after 2001, all you heard was Bonds. Why? Because so many in the media absolutely hated Bonds. He had committed the unpardonable sin: letting writers and broadcasters know it wasn’t important what they wrote or said about him.

I had a different opinion of Bonds, perhaps because I try to avoid letting my personal opinions influence my professional evaluations, as I watched Bonds morph from a great all-around athlete into the best hitter I’ve seen in half a century of watching Major League Baseball.

Bonds taught himself to be totally disciplined at the plate, not swinging at pitches even barely out of the strike zone. He might only get one good pitch to hit in a game — but he hammered that pitch. He would sit at his locker for 30 minutes before each game, visualizing what he’d see from the opposing starter. At home games, after the seventh inning, he would set the pitching machine behind the dugout for left-handed pitches, because he knew he’d face a left-handed reliever.

But according to my colleagues, his success all came from chemicals.

Rodriguez was supposed to be the anti-Bonds, a “clean” player who would erase his home run record. But when I talked to baseball people, his claims that he hadn’t taken anything were greeted skeptically.

Rodriguez admitted Monday that he has taken steroids and we know that 104 players tested positive in 2003. Bonds is hardly alone.
Many people in the media owe Bonds an apology, but don’t expect that to happen. Hypocrisy rules in baseball on the steroids issue, and the commissioner is at the top of the chain.
 

Dachs

Hero of the Soviet Union
Joined
Feb 23, 2005
Messages
32,588
Location
Moscow
Baseball is America's Favorite Sport only in the eyes of sportswriters and historians and others who get all nostalgic.
This historian thinks that baseball sucks. :wavey: I think blaming Selig for distribution is a bit much but that he definitely knew what was going on and tolerated it.
 

kulade

Deity
Joined
Dec 12, 2003
Messages
4,545
Wrestlers can hardly be blamed for taking steroids; they are supposed to be faking.
 

Irish Caesar

Yellow Jacket
Joined
Feb 8, 2002
Messages
10,278
Location
Atlanta, former CSA
There is a double standard...

...but I think it's un-necessarily harsh on wrestling, and not overly lenient on baseball.

It's not like anyone has any respect for Selig anyway.
 

emzie

wicked witch of the North
Moderator
Joined
Jul 5, 2004
Messages
21,316
Location
Ottawa, Canada
I find it sad that Ventura is Minnesota's most respectable politician. :( Though not a good one.
 
Top Bottom