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Weather Attire?

Zardnaar

Deity
Joined
Nov 16, 2003
Messages
20,051
Location
Dunedin, New Zealand
Stupid question how do you dress for the weather? I'm getting older now so are starting to layer up.

Think it's close to freezing outside. About to go to bed but the heat pumps been off for hours. Wearing track pants, t shirt and a sweatshirt. Cats on me though.

If I go outside I'll throw on a puffer vest and maybe a beanie hat if it's really cold (below 10 Celsius).

If it's below freezing or close to it I'll add a thin long sleeve jacket or remove vest and wear a thicker coat.

When I was younger school uniforms weren't the most practical. Shirts year round long sleeve shirt under the jersey in winter short sleeves in summer. 5km bike ride in shorts middle of winter 7:30-8am. Middle of winter could freeze over.

Rugby is also a winter sport here If the field is frozen you play anyway. In shorts.

Summer shorts and t shirt. Probably get sun burnt. Those early grunge shirts from 1991? Similar shirts are still available locally. Practical due to weather. Think I own around 4.

Bought a sunhat last summer.
 
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At least 3 layers for Canberra winter mornings or nights. A good jacket too, not something made primarily for Sydney and Melbourne's mild winters.
 
When it is 98 in NM, just three pieces of clothing are necessary, plus a hat.
 
When it is 98 in NM, just three pieces of clothing are necessary, plus a hat.

So you go barefoot? I assume the 3 pieces of clothing are underwear, shirt, and pants/shorts.


Dressing for the weather here differs, depending on one's tolerance to heat/cold. I actually have fleece blankets on my bed right now and was thankful for them this morning even though yesterday was horribly hot. Hypothyroidism has meant that my feet can feel like they're freezing even in the middle of July. So while my feet were under 3 layers of fleece this morning, the rest of me wasn't.

Dressing for winter depends on temperature and wind/wind chill. -20C without wind chill is considerably warmer than when there is a wind. I have two coats - one is a heavy winter coat that gets used when the temperature goes below -25C or when it's -20C + wind. The other coat is a jacket that's good for year-round; it will do for spring, rainy days in summer, and it's good for fall. Of course I do dress in layers underneath, and the temperature/wind will determine if that's a single layer, single layer with sweater, whether my top is short-sleeved, long-sleeved, combination, lightweight or heavier... the thing about layers means that if you're overheated you can remove one layer. I always have a toque with me, with two pairs of gloves - one light, the other heavy. Depending on the temperature/wind I will wear one pair or the other, or both on really cold days. And like most sensible people here, I avoid going outside in -30C or colder unless I absolutely have to.

When temperatures get into -35 to -40C, Environment Canada issues warnings to people about things like this - dress in layers, wear a toque, scarf, and gloves, if you're driving on the highway have an emergency kit with you with food, water, matches, necessary meds, blanket, first aid kit, shovel, etc. since if you're caught in a blizzard on the highway and go in the ditch you'll need to be able to survive until rescue comes. It's sometimes a couple of days if the storm is that bad. They absolutely advise against trying to walk out, as the usual outcome is that they will find your body later. Maybe. Sometimes they never do (there are cases in which people have attempted to walk out and find help, leaving the kids in the vehicle; the cops find the kids but the parent is never found).


Dressing for summer... that means long sleeves outside, as I'm very susceptible to sunburn and it provides a little extra protection from mosquitoes. A hat is essential, too, as sunstroke isn't fun.
 
Most people master dressing themselves before they move out from their parents house.
 
Stories from Canada make me whince lol.

-10 makes news here.

I remember when @Kyriakos listed his requirements for moving to Canada. Based on that list, I concluded that there are exactly two cities in the entire country that would suit him, and both are in southwestern British Columbia: Vancouver or Victoria. They get so little snow in that part of the province that it tends to make us snicker here on the other side of the mountains when people panic over a mere inch of snow. Of course it is a bad thing if that turns to ice, as that's dangerous - especially in a region where there are so many mountains, hills, and switchback highways.

But normal snow? Put on sensible clothing and get on with your day.

With no wind chill, -10C in winter is what we call "a nice, warm day." My regular jacket suffices (though I do wear long sleeved tops and maybe a sweater). And I remember going out to a medical appointment after we'd had a cold snap of temperatures in the -30s... it was -20C with no wind, and it was actually not bad at all. People were greeting each other with "Nice day!"
 
I remember when @Kyriakos listed his requirements for moving to Canada. Based on that list, I concluded that there are exactly two cities in the entire country that would suit him, and both are in southwestern British Columbia: Vancouver or Victoria. They get so little snow in that part of the province that it tends to make us snicker here on the other side of the mountains when people panic over a mere inch of snow. Of course it is a bad thing if that turns to ice, as that's dangerous - especially in a region where there are so many mountains, hills, and switchback highways.

But normal snow? Put on sensible clothing and get on with your day.

With no wind chill, -10C in winter is what we call "a nice, warm day." My regular jacket suffices (though I do wear long sleeved tops and maybe a sweater). And I remember going out to a medical appointment after we'd had a cold snap of temperatures in the -30s... it was -20C with no wind, and it was actually not bad at all. People were greeting each other with "Nice day!"

Yeah it's all relative. I've been up in the alpine areas with snow and it's felt warmer than cold wet coast even though it's actually not.

-20 is about the coldest it gets and that's during a severe cold snap in certain locations due to microclimate.

No snow so far locally just frosts. That's more inland in the deep south and the alpine areas.
 
Of course it's not what our pals from Down Under are asking, but for us in the northern hemisphere it's probably time to try some linen clothes.
 
I didn't get good at this in the winter until my late 20s. It doesn't get as cold here as in Red Deer, -20C is about as cold as it ever gets, once in my lifetime it has hit -30C. But nonetheless, Valka's advice still largely applies, you just don't need quite as many layers as it doesn't get as cold.

I actually have three winter coats, plus a spring jacket. A medium coat for 30-45 Fahrenheit, a nice wool pea coat for 15-35 Fahrenheit (or colder with a sweater), and a thick, wind-resistant heavy and long coat for when it gets really cold. If I'm wearing the latter two, I'll almost always be wearing gloves, with two options, one thinner and with better finger mobility, the other heavier and more wind-resistant. Occasionally I'll wear the lightest gloves with the medium (30-45F) coat if the humidity is really low as gloves also help protect the hands from drying out. The colder two coats are always complemented by a scarf, made of wool, which makes a huge difference for the neck. The coldest coat and sometimes the second-coldest are accompanied by an ushanka, basically the Russian version of the Canadian toque, which features faux fur, ear flaps, and a strap under the chin to keep the flaps from flapping, and means the ears stay nice and warm even without earmuffs. That hat was the best money I ever spent on winter gear. Not super cheap ($25-$30), but makes a world of difference in being comfortable outside in the winter.

I think at the coldest point last winter, when it got to around -20C (which it doesn't every winter, but did this winter), my heaviest layered outfit was long sleeved shirt + sweater + pull-over sweatshirt + heaviest coat, with scarf, heavy cloves, and ushanka. Not bad at all with all those clothes on! And boots of course, although I don't have really serious winter boots, just above-the-ankle-but-not-fully-waterproof. When it's that cold though, the snow doesn't melt, so that's okay. Oh, and two pairs of socks. I upgraded to some fairly thick wool socks last winter, from a thin wool sock + thicker cotton sock, and that was nice for days spent nearly entirely outside at -10 C. They're expensive, so I only have two pairs of thick wool socks, but having it was a noticeable upgrade in my "dressing for the weather". Don't really need them to go in to the office though, thick cotton is fine for that, they're more for out traipsing around in the snow.

I am not sure that my heaviest coat would be comfortable in the coldest part of Red Deer's winter. I'd probably be wearing that 4-layer setup fairly often if I didn't upgrade to an even heavier coat.

You probably don't need 3 coats though. I was doing fine with two (plus spring jacket), when my lightest coat was rediscovered in my parents' basement a couple years ago, sitting there since not long after I joined CFC. It slotted in nicely from a warmth standpoint, but sweatshirt + spring jacket more or less matches it. It's hopelessly mid-2000s style-wise though, so sometimes I'll wear the next-heavier one for style reasons. But in 10 years or so it ought to be considered vintage!

Summertime? I'm imagining BirdJaguar must go bare-chested, underwear + shorts + sandals. For me, I made sure to keep a sweatshirt in the office in the summer at my pre-pandemic workplace, all the cool air rose to the floor I was working on and it got really cold at times. I know that from a physics standpoint, warm air is supposed to rise, but they had some issues with their HVAC system and the result was that the 9th floor was always colder than the 8th.
 
I thought it was a camera and pants that were stolen.
 
Last week in in spring.

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