What TV Shows Are You Watching? The 9th Is - Excuse Me - A Damn Fine Cup Of Coffee

All the replacement characters in Criminal Minds suck. The show is still holding my attention, but I'm over a season deep in having Prentiss and Rossi and they're both insufferable with no signs of improvement on the horizon. In the last episode I watched, there were several scenes of just those two characters interacting, and I tuned out completely. I want Gideon back. I don't really care about Prentiss's predecessor since they character-assassinated her anyway.

I still need to catch up on For All Mankind. And start Monarch, the new season of Halo, and School Spirits. I also watched a couple episodes of the new season of Foundation and it's been awfully boring.
I grew to like Prentiss, but Rossi never fully replaced Gideon for me. Of course the show went on for like another 12 years after I stopped watching it, so maybe I would've come around on Rossi if I'd stuck with it.
 
I grew to like Prentiss, but Rossi never fully replaced Gideon for me. Of course the show went on for like another 12 years after I stopped watching it, so maybe I would've come around on Rossi if I'd stuck with it.
Yeah, it's a little discouraging to finish an episode, mark it complete, and then have the app say (245 remaining). :lol:
 
Any news on the inevitable death of Severance - ie when s2 is available? :)
I had a sudden impulse to listen to some Joe McPhee the other day. I assume that was my Innie sending me a message.



 
Me neither i think..David Lynch film?
With Patricia Arquette, which I assume is the connection with Severance. Google says it's streaming on the Criterion Channel, which is one of the more expensive services ($10.99).
 
Would you believe I've never seen Lost Highway?
It's imo one of his better films.
Dick Laurent is dead :)

Tbh imo Lynch is mostly a fluke, given he doesn't have a set meaning for his works - by which I mean he doesn't calculate even potential meanings, just relies on the viewer liking him enough to do calculations that justify the work, which Lynch wouldn't have thought of.
The cinematography is nice, though, and he often goes for an atmosphere anyway - usually a naive good vs evil one.

The tv show Twin Peaks, season 3, managed to become a ludicrous farce in the end. Particularly with the fake-english-accent-boy-with-powerful-hand-that-defeats-evil.
 
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I would highlight Mulholland Drive and Blue Velvet.
Lots of flops in his other works, just by looking at the list :)

MD was interesting to me even while i didn't understand everything (no shame in that i hope :lol:).
That film had something special, some kind of good weirdness.
 
My suspicion - which is partly based on Lynch saying as much in interviews - is that he has become used to audiences that will project a personal explanation of the work, which typically is one they find important => the work becomes seen as itself important.
But that simply means you wanted to see it as important. It's very common a phenomenon in literature: if you like a specific author, from older works, you are quite likely to try to project meaning to a new work which for a first reader seems to be pretty poor.
In a way it's as if the movie/other was vague enough to be an entire function and each such viewer can project their own favorite number on it as a solution. "I like the number 2! So in Lynch's movie, f(x)=x^2, I think that x=square root of 2. Lynch is brilliant!"

And to bring this back to Severance: I am 99.9% certain by now that we projected/imagined far bigger worth to it than what the creators had in mind. Which is why it will collapse in s2 :)
 
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Cut from a longer article

“Shōgun,” premiering Feb. 27 on FX and Hulu, is the most expensive production ever for Disney-owned FX. It’s a lavish and risky retelling of a title that looms large in pop culture. In James Clavell’s 1975 novel, an English sailor navigates a labyrinth of Japanese warlords, Catholic priests and romance with his translator. Clavell’s bestseller led to a 1980 NBC miniseries that became one of the highest-rated broadcasts of all time.

Starring Richard Chamberlain, the miniseries broke ground by shooting in Japan and showcasing a cast including Toshiro Mifune, a legend from Akira Kurosawa’s films. But there were blind spots. Among them: Japanese dialogue with no subtitles, a choice that underscored the perspective of Chamberlain’s character while rendering the Japanese characters alien.

For Sanada, the effect the miniseries had in introducing Japanese history to America was more significant than the show itself. He and his collaborators spent the last five years on a new version that would rebalance the story’s East-meets-West theme, immerse viewers in the Sengoku period of 1600 and do justice to the complex narrative of the novel.


 
And to bring this back to Severance: I am 99.9% certain by now that we projected/imagined far bigger worth to it than what the creators had in mind. Which is why it will collapse in s2 :)
Like when people were freaking out over Lost. You'd think we would learn from our mistakes... :lol:
 
Ok. Started S3 of Star Trek Pickard. Without spoiling anything important,


How the fudge did anyone think that a pump action phaser shotgun made any damned sense whatsoever?
 
Did any Trek episode discuss at all how each time they are teleported, the original dies?
Star-lemmings ^^
There's been a couple episodes that explicitly say there's continuity of consciousness while in the transport buffer.

Though there are also episodes that kind of go contrary to that: the infamous Tuvix episode in Voyager begs the question of what happened to Tuvok and Neelix in the interim.
 
There's been a couple episodes that explicitly say there's continuity of consciousness while in the transport buffer.

Though there are also episodes that kind of go contrary to that: the infamous Tuvix episode in Voyager begs the question of what happened to Tuvok and Neelix in the interim.
And it is TV fiction. There is no need for realism or actual science. Asking about such things in ST is like asking about how a guy can turn into a bug over night. They are just made up stories and internal consistency is not required.
 
I've been watching this too. I haven't seen any of the previous seasons but my understanding each season is it's own self contained story so I just dove into the 4th season. Anyway, the first episode I thought set up a decent mystery but episodes 2-4 have been 'wheel-spinny' as you put it. Too much focus on each characters personal lives and not enough on progressing the actual case. Supposedly there's only two episodes left. I don't know how they're going to tie together all the loose ends of all the subplots other than 'evil spirits did it', or it was 'all just a dream', or something like that.
Well episode 5 was a little bit better. It did advance the main case which was what was keeping me watching. But I didn't like they way they ended it at all in the final episode. There's also weird continuity errors throughout the season. Like the the giant snowstorm in the final episode that magically turns into a clear nighttime sky after a minute.

Spoiler :
So it was really the cleaning ladies who did it. And all the supernatural spooky stuff is just...in peoples heads I guess? It seems like the writers wanted to pull a 'The Usual Suspects' twist where the culprit wasn't who you thought all along. Except in The Usual Suspects the culprit was central to the story whereas the cleaning ladies in True Detective, well I had forgotten all about them they were so superfluous. Not a satisfying twist at all. It might as well have been one of the extras in the laundromat, or the mine, or any other random place in the show.

Also, instead of dealing with the moral dilemma about what to do with with a group of killers who murdered another group of killers, the writers just skipped right over it preferring to pass it off as a girl boss moment because the lone shred of evidence they had wasn't enough for an arrest. So officially 'nobody' did it. Sigh.

Also also, the lone piece of evidence was a hand-print? You mean a group of women invade the research station, round up all the scientists at gunpoint, and that's all the evidence they leave? Come on. Not a whole lot of detecting going on in this True Detective show.
 
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